Ten Worlds: Everything that Orbits the Sun

Ten Worlds: Everything that Orbits the Sun

by Ken Croswell
     
 

Revised to Expand on the Pluto Controversy. To give young readers the science behind the headlines, astronomer Ken Croswell has expanded on his acclaimed Ten Worlds—a Society of School Librarians International Honor Book and the most substantial and beautiful children\u2019s book about the solar system.

Overview


Revised to Expand on the Pluto Controversy. To give young readers the science behind the headlines, astronomer Ken Croswell has expanded on his acclaimed Ten Worlds—a Society of School Librarians International Honor Book and the most substantial and beautiful children\u2019s book about the solar system.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
On the basis of its striking design and photographs, this handsome, large-format volume is well worthy of praise. And astronomer Crosswell's (See the Stars) concise yet conversational, information-packed text wins it sky-high accolades in the narrative sphere as well. As the author takes readers on an elucidating tour of the solar system-traveling outwards from the sun-brilliantly colored photos of each planet and of their moons (mostly NASA shots) pop dramatically from a black background, while the text appears against pastel-toned panels. Croswell authoritatively explains the physical characteristics, temperature and atmospheric makeup of the planets; tells how they were named; examines comets, meteors and asteroids; and details the knowledge gleaned from spacecrafts' photographs and specific astronomers' discoveries. He confidently puts forth his own theories (he believes in the theory that an asteroid killed off the dinosaurs and allowed other forms of life to evolve, including humans). Timely references to recently launched spacecraft and their missions, and an intriguing look at "the tenth planet" (discovered in 2005, the planet takes 559 years to orbit the sun), attest to the book's relevance. Colorful, accessible analogies abound: remarking that stars shine during the day as well as the night, yet are washed out by sunlight, Croswell notes, "In the same way, you can't hear a soft flute when a loud car goes by." Concluding with charts that handily round up statistics about the planets and their moons, this eye-opening book will feed kids' curiosity about the worlds beyond earth. Ages 6-up. (May) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Which planet is the hottest? Which planet formed from rocks crashing? What year will the spacecraft reach Pluto since its departure in 2006? These questions plus a lot more are answered in astronomer Croswell's vibrant, oversized book about all ten planets. That is right! You did not know there was a tenth planet discovered in 2005 much farther away than Pluto? Croswell even discusses comets, asteroids, and meteors. He discusses the entire solar system—the Sun and the planets and their moons. All scientific terms are explained for clear understanding. The pictures are descriptive and glossy, sure to capture your attention. The pages are black and the text is highlighted with vibrant colors. Each part of the solar system comes to life with the use of color and detail. The details are extraordinary, and there are some extras included such as a trivia list, graphs, and an index. There is a great deal to be learned here, and it is written in a language suitable for kids at a young age. 2006, Boyds Mills Press, Ages 8 up.
—Kelly Grebinoski
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-This oversize book has beautiful, full-color photographs of the planets, moons, and sun in our solar system. Each planet's origin, geography, and history are discussed. The photographs, many of them encompassing an entire page, are of superior quality and set against a black backdrop. The text, done in a fairly large font set against color backgrounds, is easy to read. Students with little to no background in the subject will find this book enjoyable and easy to understand. This slim, authoritative volume has plenty of information for reports and may spark an interest in finding additional resources.-Linda Wadleigh, Haymon-Morris Middle School, Winder, GA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
With breathtaking, beautifully reproduced images from NASA, astronomer Croswell introduces the newest version of our solar system. Double-page spreads, or more, are devoted to the general solar system, the sun, each of the ten planets, comets, meteors and the system's birth. The tone is informal, but the text includes a wealth of information, appropriate comparisons and good transitions; many words are defined in context. The backmatter includes charts comparing the ten planets, seven big moons and first four asteroids, a list of planetary extremes and an index but no glossary. Science writing for young readers often involves presenting generally accepted information as facts, but Croswell has taken some chances here. For instance, the International Astronomical Union will not even decide if 2003 UB313 is a planet until this summer. He does mention the controversy, but, except for the careful book title, treats its acceptance as established fact. Hindsight will show whether this and other choices were right or wrong. For now, teachers and middle-grade readers will welcome this informative visual feast. (Nonfiction. 8-14)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590785317
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
02/01/2007
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
56
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 12.20(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
6 - 18 Years

Meet the Author


Ken Croswell earned a PhD in astronomy at Harvard University and wrote several critically acclaimed books. He has written for Star Date radio program, the New York Times, Astronomy, Sky & Telescope, and New Scientist. He lives in Berkeley, California.

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