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The Ten-Year Century: Explaining the First Decade of the New Millennium
     

The Ten-Year Century: Explaining the First Decade of the New Millennium

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by James B. Sutherland
 

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Remember worrying about the Y2K bug in 1999? Or life before Twitter? Ten years ago, September 11 was just another day, Facebook didn't exist, and Barack Obama was a little-known state senator. Some have called the jam-packed first decade of the new millennium the "ten-year century" for all of the history-making, life-changing developments it's contained.

Now, James

Overview

Remember worrying about the Y2K bug in 1999? Or life before Twitter? Ten years ago, September 11 was just another day, Facebook didn't exist, and Barack Obama was a little-known state senator. Some have called the jam-packed first decade of the new millennium the "ten-year century" for all of the history-making, life-changing developments it's contained.

Now, James Sutherland explores these influential years for the audience that's grown up in it, putting history in context and explaining how the world is smaller, faster, and more connected than it's ever been--and why it matters.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This overview of the first 10 years of the new millennium focuses on significant developments that have shaped life in the United States today. Former political reporter Sutherland (Up Close: Ronald Reagan) begins each section with a synopsis of trends in popular culture and newsworthy events (such as the creation of Facebook and destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia in 2003), before discussing specific topics, which range from the voter recount during the 2000 election to September 11, the war in Iraq, and Hurricane Katrina. After addressing the prevailing pessimism as a result of the current economy, Sutherland ends on a hopeful note, suggesting that solutions come from "learning about the world and always trying to understand the times we live in." The lucid, balanced narration results in a nuanced representation of a rapidly changing era. Ages 12–up. (Oct.)
VOYA - Paula Brehm-Heeger
This serviceable volume highlights the memorable, and not-so-memorable, moments of the past decade (2000 through 2009), from 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and the invention of facemash.com (the precursor to Facebook) to Columbia Recordings' signing of the Jonas Brothers and Puff Daddy's breakup with Jennifer Lopez. Arranged chronologically, with each year as a separate chapter, the table of contents is not further subdivided, and this lack of detail makes it a bit challenging to locate information about individual events. General source notes are included, but references in the text to specific data and statistics are not footnoted. Black-and-white photos are sprinkled throughout, but the quality is poor. Blocks of highlighted text explaining noteworthy happenings are interspersed with the information about each year. However, some of these sections feature cryptic labels, such as "the Bear and the Dragon" and "The Russian Bear vs. the Holy Warrior," that seem to confuse more than clarify. Sections bearing straightforward labels are more helpful and enlightening, including an excellent section called "Learning Counterterrorism," which succinctly explains the role of the FBI, CIA, and NSA. Overall, there is little new or compelling information about this summary of the decade, and Sutherland's functional overview is unlikely to convince teens that the past ten years have had an earth-shattering impact on the course of the world or their lives. Reviewer: Paula Brehm-Heeger
Children's Literature - Denise Lockett
This text ably covers the breadth of the first decade of the twenty-first century, and the scope includes both political and social developments on a global scale. The volume is focused on the first ten years of the millennium from an American perspective, and the events of 9/11 and its military aftermath are central. The volume, while slim, is packed with succinctly-worded yet comprehensive overviews of each year. The structure offers a prologue, a chapter per year, and an epilogue, plus source notes, a bibliography and a comprehensive index. The evenly-paced, engaging text provides helpful transitions between each year's major themes: "Dot-Com Bust," "We Got Him" (the capture of Saddam Hussein), "Truthiness" (alluding to the Daily Show, describing our changing media and our bent toward the biased selection of information) and "When the Levees Break" about the flood in New Orleans are some examples of the catchy captions used to segue from one topic to another. Another useful feature of this volume's presentation is the occasional insertion of in-depth discussions of selected themes that are presented in grayed-out boxes to emphasize their special topic quality. These are like expanded footnotes that dovetail with one of the general topics addressed in the main text, such as "Learning Counterterrorism," which explores the role of the various U.S. intelligence agencies and their failure to coordinate efforts to prevent terrorism on U.S. soil. Additionally, the text is punctuated by pertinent photographs which are inserted at relevant intervals and which skillfully illustrate the text. From a discussion of the fears we faced of Y2K computer crashes at its onset, through the Red/Blue divisions in United States' "values"-based voting patterns, on to 9/11 and counterterrorism, Iraq, Iran, and Afghanistan, climate change and global struggle over the accord, and Beijing Olympics and giving insights into China's rise as an economic powerhouse as the United States struggled with rising unemployment, and the election of Barak Obama and his inherited economic and political challenges. The brilliant writing provides a balanced and yet highly descriptive lens on the cultural and political changes affecting the United States. All-in-all, this volume presents a politically balanced, U.S.-focused perspective on the first nine years of the twenty-first century. Reviewer: Denise Lockett
School Library Journal
Gr 7–10—Sutherland's focus is clearly on politics, providing in-depth descriptions of the various campaigns and elections that have occurred over the last 10 years, including the Gore vs. Bush election and the wrangling that followed in Florida, ending with the Supreme Court decision. Details about September 11th, the wars that followed, and important players of the decade are all included. References to pop culture or social phenomena are mostly in passing. Lengthy descriptions are sometimes repetitive. However, the writing is accessible and readers will detect no real bias or agenda. The captioned stock photographs do little to enhance the text. Detailed source notes and a lengthy bibliography are included. While not providing any new information, this volume could be a solid choice for libraries looking to have some of recent history available to students.—Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA
Kirkus Reviews
There was great anticipation for the arrival of the 21st century, but few could have predicted the rapid change the first ten years would bring. Stories of a contested election decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, the 9/11 attacks, two wars, natural disasters, the near collapse of the financial system and the election of the nation's first African-American president are woven with those of the dot.com bust, the rise of social networking, the explosion of new communication tools and the splintering of information media. Following an introduction and prologue that nicely set the stage, each year gets its own chapter, and events with the greatest impact are discussed in a lively manner. Sutherland tries to be evenhanded, although some might take issue with his positioning PBS's News Hour as liberal opposite conservative Fox News. The author provides the often-missing context for dramatic headlines. However, the unexciting format will do little to attract readers to these stories. There are a few familiar photographs but little else to grab readers who could be enriched by this perspective. Source notes and bibliography are included, as is an index (not seen). (Nonfiction. 12 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101457276
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
10/14/2010
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
165
Lexile:
1140L (what's this?)
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author

James Sutherland is a freelance writer. He lives with his wife and son in Brooklyn, New York.

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The Ten-Year Century: Explaining the First Decade of the New Millennium 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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