The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

5.0 6
by Anne Bronte, Herbert Rosengarten, Margaret Smith
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0198125968

ISBN-13: 9780198125969

Pub. Date: 12/28/1996

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Anne, like her sisters Emily and Charlotte, published under a male pseudonym, Acton Bell, yet still this novel was scorned by many for its exposure of the abusive male chauvinism concealed, like all things sexual, during the Victorian Era. Just as she had to use a male pseudonym in order to be free to publish, as women authors were not yet deemed acceptable or

Overview

Anne, like her sisters Emily and Charlotte, published under a male pseudonym, Acton Bell, yet still this novel was scorned by many for its exposure of the abusive male chauvinism concealed, like all things sexual, during the Victorian Era. Just as she had to use a male pseudonym in order to be free to publish, as women authors were not yet deemed acceptable or bankable, Helen Graham, the novel's protagonist and a battered wife, assumes an alias in order to gain freedom from her suffering and take up residence in Wildfell Hall, "the wildest and the loftiest eminence in our neighborhood," according to the tale's narrator. Like her sisters, Anne employs the atmosphere of the bleak Yorkshire moors and the presence of an old mansion to set the stage for a tragedy that reveals the secret violence in a society considered well-mannered, echoing the rough, cold, rugged gloom of the fictional Wildfell Hall and her family's own remote parsonage; narrating a story that Brontë scholar Margeret Lane remarked, "is so close to one of the tragedies in the sisters' own lives, that no perceptive reader can be indifferent to it."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198125969
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
12/28/1996
Series:
Clarendon Edition of the Novels of the Brontes Series
Pages:
574
Product dimensions:
5.75(w) x 8.81(h) x 1.46(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Introduction
Anne Brontë: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

Appendix A: Other Writings by Anne and Charlotte Brontë

  1. Anne Brontë, Letter to the Reverend David Thom (30 December 1848)
  2. Anne Brontë, “To Cowper” (1846)
  3. Anne Brontë, “A Word to the ‘Elect’” (1846)
  4. From Charlotte Brontë, “Biographical Notice of Ellis and Acton Bell” (1850)
  5. Charlotte Brontë, Introduction to “Poems by Acton Bell” (1850)

Appendix B: Contemporary Reviews

  1. Athenaeum (8 July 1848)
  2. The Examiner (29 July 1848)
  3. Fraser’s Magazine (April 1849)
  4. The Literary World (12 August 1848)
  5. North American Review (October 1848)
  6. Rambler (September 1848)
  7. Sharpe’s London Magazine (August 1848)
  8. The Spectator (8 July 1848)

Appendix C: Women’s Education

  1. From Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792)
  2. From Hannah More, Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education (1799)
  3. From Sarah Lewis, Woman’s Mission (1840)
  4. John Cowie, “Noble Sentiments on the Influence of Women,” Howitt’s Journal (March 1847)

Appendix D: Wives

  1. From Hannah More, Coelebs in Search of a Wife (1808)
  2. From Caroline Norton, A Letter to the Queen on Lord Chancellor Cranworth’s Marriage and Divorce Bill (1855)

Appendix E: Childrearing

  1. From Hannah More, Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education (1799)
  2. From John S.C. Abbott, The Mother at Home (1833)
  3. From John S.C. Abbott, The Child at Home (1834)
  4. From Sarah Lewis, Woman’s Mission (1840)
  5. From Berthold Auerbach, “Every–day Wisdom, Plucked from the Garden of Childhood,” Howitt’s Journal (January 1848)
  6. From Anonymous, “The Moral Discipline of Children,” British Quarterly Review (April 1858)

Appendix F: Temperance

  1. From Joseph Entwisle, “On Drinking Spirits,” The Methodist Magazine (July 1804)
  2. J.P. Parker, Lecture on Temperance and Slavery, Howitt’s Journal (24 April 1847)
  3. From Anonymous, “Temperance and Teetotal Societies,” Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (April 1853)
  4. Thomas Buchanan Read, “What a Word May Do” (1868)

Appendix G: Women and Art

  1. Anonymous, “Let Us Join the Ladies,” Punch (July 1857)
  2. From Ellen C. Clayton, English Female Artists (1876)

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The Tenant of Wildfell Hall 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having thoroughly read the works of both Charlotte and Emily Bronte; I have to say I don't understand the tendency to shun the works of Anne. Anne's novel shares many characteristics of her exaulted siblings. Anyone who likes the Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights should enjoy this novel as well! I truly hope that Anne begins to regain her rightful place in the literary canon.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Anne Bronte has given the reader a view of her life. I watched the BBC Production of this novel on Masterpiece Theatre. Everyone should read the novel and see the movie!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was an excellent one. Having never attempted to read classic literature, I was caught by this book. The story was written as if Anne Bronte were writing the story about her own life, she demonstrates the hardships women in her time went through. The language is simple and the story not at all difficult to follow. Written to be clever instead of witty, the story comes to life in the diaries of the two main characters. A wonderful book!!!
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