Overview

Gertrude Stein is remembered as a Parisian mentor to Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Matisse, Picasso, and other members of the Lost Generation. But she was also an author and poet, known for experimental works that ignored traditional narrative forms and linear convention. This is one of her little-known works, a paean to food, objects, and rooms.
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Tender Buttons

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Overview

Gertrude Stein is remembered as a Parisian mentor to Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Matisse, Picasso, and other members of the Lost Generation. But she was also an author and poet, known for experimental works that ignored traditional narrative forms and linear convention. This is one of her little-known works, a paean to food, objects, and rooms.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016052205
  • Publisher: The New Atlantian Library
  • Publication date: 1/22/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 142 KB

Meet the Author

Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was a writer, patron, and art collector. An American living in Paris, she wrote experimental novels, poetry, and plays that eschewed narrative and linear conventions. For some forty years, Stein’s Parisian home was a gathering place for expatriate American artists and writers, as well as others in the world of arts and letters. Among them were Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Joyce, Picasso, and Matisse.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2009

    Language Poetry

    If you are a fan of language poetry, this is the book for you. Stein is the woman who virtually created "language poetry" as we know it. This collection of her poems focuses on everyday things. The first section is all about things that are in her home: A Vase, A Box, etc. The second section is about food and the third about rooms.

    Stein was one of the expatriates that were in Paris after WWI and were trying to find a new way of thinking about writing about the world. Stein famously wrote "Act so that there is no use in a center." Stein wrote without a center. She, along with many others, believed that life had no center, and if it did, its only center would be art.

    Stein had a personal art gallery that housed paintings by Picasso, Cézanne, Gauguin, Matisse, and Renoir. She believed that art was the greatest medium and would collect that which she valued. In fact, many chose to visit Stein rather than go to the museums because Stein had "better" contemporary art than the museums did at the time.

    Many have compared Stein's writing to the Cubist movement. This certain helps one understand her writing style. The repetition, the use of color, and the way shapes and/or words can take on a new meaning when used in certain contexts.

    However, if you are expecting a linear thought process, traditional ("normal") writing style, or any kind of character or plot, this is not the collection for you. If you choose Stein's "Tender Buttons", please do so with the understanding that this is not even typical poetry. Please keep an open mind, and if it helps, do some research to help you understand the deeper meanings of poems such as "A Box."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2013

    A must read with an open mind

    In order to read Tender Bottons you have to understand Stein. Without knowledhe of her love of the English language and playibg with it, you will be lost. The book was not written to have any kind of progression. It is meant to be read aloud and with many interpretations. If you read it in your head you will be lost. Stein is like a mad scientest. Many know hes brilliant but few can understand her enough to appreciate her and her work.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2012

    Hard to Understand

    This book was extremely hard to understand even though I was reading it for a class. Therefore, I would only recommend it to literary scholars who might understand it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2011

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    Posted May 13, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2009

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