×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Tender Buttons: Objects, Food, Rooms
     

Tender Buttons: Objects, Food, Rooms

2.9 11
by Gertrude Stein
 

See All Formats & Editions

Before becoming the patron of Lost Generation artists, Gertrude Stein established her reputation as an innovative author whose style was closer to painting than literature. Stein's strong influence on 20th-century literature is evident in this 1915 work of highly original prose rendered in thought-provoking experimental techniques.

Overview

Before becoming the patron of Lost Generation artists, Gertrude Stein established her reputation as an innovative author whose style was closer to painting than literature. Stein's strong influence on 20th-century literature is evident in this 1915 work of highly original prose rendered in thought-provoking experimental techniques.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Self-published in 1914, this is one of the volumes that solidified Stein's reputation. Dividing the book into three sections--Objects, Food, and Rooms--Stein attempts to form images using repetition and disjointed words. As the average person will find that it makes no sense at all, Stein's exercise in automatic writing remains in the realm of the literati.
Booknews
<:st> Reprint of the 1914 edition (cited in ) with a new note on the text. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780838300756
Publisher:
M. S. G. Haskell House
Publication date:
01/01/1970
Pages:
78

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Tender Buttons (Barnes and Noble Digital Library) 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you are a fan of language poetry, this is the book for you. Stein is the woman who virtually created "language poetry" as we know it. This collection of her poems focuses on everyday things. The first section is all about things that are in her home: A Vase, A Box, etc. The second section is about food and the third about rooms. Stein was one of the expatriates that were in Paris after WWI and were trying to find a new way of thinking about writing about the world. Stein famously wrote "Act so that there is no use in a center." Stein wrote without a center. She, along with many others, believed that life had no center, and if it did, its only center would be art. Stein had a personal art gallery that housed paintings by Picasso, C&#233;zanne, Gauguin, Matisse, and Renoir. She believed that art was the greatest medium and would collect that which she valued. In fact, many chose to visit Stein rather than go to the museums because Stein had "better" contemporary art than the museums did at the time. Many have compared Stein's writing to the Cubist movement. This certain helps one understand her writing style. The repetition, the use of color, and the way shapes and/or words can take on a new meaning when used in certain contexts. However, if you are expecting a linear thought process, traditional ("normal") writing style, or any kind of character or plot, this is not the collection for you. If you choose Stein's "Tender Buttons", please do so with the understanding that this is not even typical poetry. Please keep an open mind, and if it helps, do some research to help you understand the deeper meanings of poems such as "A Box."
otterly More than 1 year ago
This was quite a short book--supposedly being quite artistic. What came to my mind is that she was either influenced by Dt. Seuss, or he was influenced by her. It is different--a sort of cookie for the brain. Maybe a book group would like to dissect it. They would have plenty of time to eat refreshments and drink tea.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Even my attempt above to parody her style makes far more sense than anything in this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In order to read Tender Bottons you have to understand Stein. Without knowledhe of her love of the English language and playibg with it, you will be lost. The book was not written to have any kind of progression. It is meant to be read aloud and with many interpretations. If you read it in your head you will be lost. Stein is like a mad scientest. Many know hes brilliant but few can understand her enough to appreciate her and her work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was extremely hard to understand even though I was reading it for a class. Therefore, I would only recommend it to literary scholars who might understand it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Put Trustworthy down.