Terms of Engagement: The United States and the European Security Identity

Terms of Engagement: The United States and the European Security Identity

by Michael Brenner
     
 

Michael Brenner examines European efforts—and American responses—to reduced defense dependency in a post-Cold War world. Unresolved questions abound: institutional form, political direction, resources, and—above all—uncertainty about the place of the United States in security arrangements for and with a new Europe. As he makes clear, the

Overview

Michael Brenner examines European efforts—and American responses—to reduced defense dependency in a post-Cold War world. Unresolved questions abound: institutional form, political direction, resources, and—above all—uncertainty about the place of the United States in security arrangements for and with a new Europe. As he makes clear, the culture of transatlantic security dependency casts a shadow over the ongoing project of reequilibrating the Euro-American alliance. U.S. prestige and power weigh all the heavier because of American ambivalence in coming to terms with its allies' ambitions.

Agreeing on a conception of European Security and Defense Identity and measures to implement it has three requirements: clarifying a security agenda dominated by political goals; candid dialogue on the apprehensions the transatlantic partners have about each other; and dedication to perfecting multilateralism as the standard behavioral code for a more egalitarian alliance. Giving life to ESDI unavoidably will generate tensions and amplify a European voice that at times will grate on Washington's ears. However, as Brenner asserts, making multilateralism work is the best way to ensure that those negatives are outweighed by the value ESDI has for advancing U.S. as well as European interests. This is must reading for scholars, students, and policy makers involved with European security and international relations issues.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Brenner (international affairs, U. of Pittsburgh) describes European security and Defense Identity, the European pillar of NATO, as a search for self-actualization rather than for tangible results, and therefore difficult for all players to quantify. He finds that the initiative for strengthening it is bolstered by the end of Cold-War dependency on the US, but dampened somewhat by the lack of a significant security threat, a kaleidoscope of existing organizations, and ambiguous feelings on both sides of the Atlantic about the future role of the US. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780275964962
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/09/1998
Series:
Washington Papers Series
Pages:
142
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

Michael Brenner is Professor of International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of Defense and the Foreign Service Institute. Professor Brenner has written extensively on security and international affairs topics, his latest works are two edited collections, NATO and Collective Security (1997) and Multilateralism and Western Strategy (1995).

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >