The Terrible Plop
  • The Terrible Plop
  • The Terrible Plop
  • The Terrible Plop
  • The Terrible Plop
<Previous >Next

The Terrible Plop

by Ursula Dubosarsky, Andrew Joyner
     
 

In this uproarious update of a favorite story, an unexplained noise leads to pandemonium among the animals. The fox, the elephant, even the big brown bear prove no match for the Terrible Plop. Only the littlest bunny learns not to panic when the sky--or something else up there--is falling.

Bright, energetic illustrations and a lively rhyming text combine to make

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

In this uproarious update of a favorite story, an unexplained noise leads to pandemonium among the animals. The fox, the elephant, even the big brown bear prove no match for the Terrible Plop. Only the littlest bunny learns not to panic when the sky--or something else up there--is falling.

Bright, energetic illustrations and a lively rhyming text combine to make this a perfect read-aloud story for little ones needing assurance that plops in the day or bumps in the night aren't as scary as they might seem.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When they hear a terrifying “PLOP!” six little rabbits that have been peacefully munching chocolate cake and carrots by the lake end up initiating animal mass hysteria à la Henny Penny. Newcomer Joyner's cartoonish illustrations are full of melodramatic action as the entire forest of panicked animals runs from a foe they've never seen. Dubosarsky's (Rex) reworking of a Tibetan story is full of sure-footed rhythm and rhymes that repeat words without becoming stale (“They do not stay./ They do not stop./ They run run run/ From the Terrible PLOP”). Even the biggest bear in the forest is eventually fooled—only the reader and “the littlest rabbit/ with the littlest hop” discover that the ominous sound is nothing but an apple falling from an overhanging tree into the lake. This talented Australian duo builds the suspense to just the right pitch, skillfully focusing the story on the smallest rabbit. Despite its fears, the rabbit ends up enjoying some more cake by the shore as it concludes that “All this running/ Should really stop.../ Who's afraid/ Of a silly old PLOP?” Ages 3–6. (Aug.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—In this Australian import, some things aren't as scary as they seem. The story is told in rhyme, with mixed-media cartoon illustrations. "Six little rabbits/Down by the lake/Munching on carrots/And chocolate cake" hear a mysterious, frightening "Plop" in the water. Five of them flee the forest, and are soon followed by an illogical assortment of animals, including a goose, antelope, leopard, moose, and pig. A big brown bear, infuriated at the thought of a creature more fearsome than he, bullies the littlest, stay-behind rabbit into showing him where this Terrible PLOP is. It proves to be only an apple falling into the lake from a nearby tree, yet the bear, too, unaccountably runs off in terror, and the rabbit happily returns to munching cake, carrots, and apples. Children would love the repetition of the word "PLOP," but the pedestrian story line, bland rhyming text, and mediocre artwork add up to a less-than-satisfying offering.—Kathleen Finn, St. Francis Xavier School, Winooski, VT
Kirkus Reviews
"Six little rabbits / Down by the lake / Munching on carrots / And chocolate cake"-until they hear a dreadful plop! And with that, the bunnies are off and running, and so is Dubosarsky's humorous tale. A cavalcade of creatures-from forest and jungle to grassland and farm-join the fear-mongering rabbits in trying to escape the plop. All flee, except the big brown bear. With his grizzly attitude, he coerces the littlest rabbit into taking him to see the monstrous thing. But when the plop reappears, the macho bear hightails it away, leaving the bunny-who discovers the plop's source-with the last laugh. Joyner, whose illustrations are reminiscent of '50s-style American animation, turns the story from playful to downright hilarious. Delectable pictures of cake are collaged into large swaths of color; mixed-media use of fur lends texture to the artwork, with all held together by crisp, fluid line work. Based on a cumulative folktale, this lively story reassures readers that things are not always as scary as they may seem-and is guaranteed to see many multiple readings. "Again!" (Picture book. 3-6)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374374280
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
08/18/2009
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
1,135,797
Product dimensions:
11.20(w) x 8.70(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >