×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Terry Riley: Autodreamographical Tales
     

Terry Riley: Autodreamographical Tales

4.0 1
by Terry Riley
 
Tzadik's Terry Riley: Autodreamographical Tales brings together two works, recorded 10 years apart: the title work, "Autodreamographical Tales" (1996) and "The Hook Lecture" (2006). On both pieces, Riley plays everything, making deft, hip use of digital sampling and audio collage in the first work and playing piano in the second. But what

Overview

Tzadik's Terry Riley: Autodreamographical Tales brings together two works, recorded 10 years apart: the title work, "Autodreamographical Tales" (1996) and "The Hook Lecture" (2006). On both pieces, Riley plays everything, making deft, hip use of digital sampling and audio collage in the first work and playing piano in the second. But what is unusual about this disc is that Riley also makes extensive use of his own voice, a surprising change for a performer who was noted for his silence on that front in concerts, speaking only at the beginning to explain that "there is nothing recorded on this tape machine that you see. It is used to create a delay and all of the music you will be hearing I will be playing live." Riley's "Autodreamographical Tales" derives from a dream diary Riley began to interact with musically, carrying the dream's content into a whirlwind of sampled sound beds and even singing a little. It takes a minute to get used to Riley's singing, but it has a lot of variety and interest in tonal color for a fellow who doesn't sing much; perhaps this shouldn't be too surprising given Riley's strong connection to legendary Indian vocalist Pandit Pran Nath, his settings of poetry by Michael McClure, and his "Uncle Jard," where the saxophone quartet is also required to sing a little bit. However, it is the speaking that communicates the most; the topics of his texts are very personal and his delivery quite personable, informal, and unselfconscious. Riley dreams about things you might expect him to dream about: milliseconds of delay time, concerts, the charisma of a conductor, musical intervals become like characters in the story. "The Hook Lecture" uses the commentary to link together several piano pieces that are alternately in the style of Bill Evans or more Riley's own minimalistic style; the suite concludes with an account of Evans' "We Will Meet Again." This is the most generous example of Riley's piano playing that we've had since New Albion's 1995 release Lisbon Concert, and in his electronic keyboard playing it's the nature of the beast that we can't really hear Riley's keyboard chops; here, Riley not only shows that he still has them, but also gives voice to his personal connection to Evans, who likewise influenced the British minimalists. Tzadik's Terry Riley: Autodreamographical Tales is a thoroughly entertaining and revelatory journey taken with one of American music's great visionaries. Moreover, this is one album of contemporary music that might be of appeal to the kids; both Riley's narration and music have the quality of the kindly, amusing uncle who's amazingly talented and knowledgeable, and children might find themselves captivated by it even if they don't understand everything he says.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/23/2010
Label:
Tzadik
UPC:
0702397807025
catalogNumber:
8070
Rank:
148241

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Terry Riley: Autodreamographical Tales 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Pseudonymise More than 1 year ago
I was expecting the precise technicality of A Rainbow In Curved Air, but instead was delighted with an organic spoken word poetry paired with brilliant compositions that evolve over the entire-course of the two part album into a overflowing crescendo of thought and emotion. Autodreamographical Tales sets the tone for the strikingly beautiful concepts that are embedded into The Hook Lecture. Part one of the album is structured as a sort of dream recollection hence the title; its sincerity and abstract surrealism are very appropriate. Part two The Hook Lecture invoked something very universal but nevertheless human and left a felling complacency. Terry Riley's musical virtuosity reverberates throughout The Hook Lecture and is tied together by brief consecutive narrative statements that are deeply intellectual while still being emotive.