Texas Snakes: Identification, Distribution, and Natural History

Texas Snakes: Identification, Distribution, and Natural History

by John E. Werler, Regina Levoy
     
 

From the legendary, fear-inspiring Western Diamondback rattlesnake to the tiny, harmless Plains blind snake, Texas has a greater diversity of snake species than any other state in the country. Recognizing the public's need for a complete guide to identifying and understanding Texas' snakes, two of the state's most respected herpetologists have joined forces to

Overview

From the legendary, fear-inspiring Western Diamondback rattlesnake to the tiny, harmless Plains blind snake, Texas has a greater diversity of snake species than any other state in the country. Recognizing the public's need for a complete guide to identifying and understanding Texas' snakes, two of the state's most respected herpetologists have joined forces to create this definitive reference to all 109 species and sub-species of Texas snakes.

Well-written species accounts describe each snake's appearance, lookalikes, size, habitat, behavior, feeding, and reproduction. The authors also include color photos and finely detailed line drawings to aid field identification, along with accurate range maps, a checklist of Texas snakes, a key to the species, and a brief discussion of classification and taxonomy. The authors round out this volume with essays on snake myths and misinformation, snakebite and its prevention, conservation, Texas biotic provinces, and a brief history of Texas herpetology.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780292791305
Publisher:
University of Texas Press
Publication date:
01/28/2000
Pages:
519
Sales rank:
1,235,043
Product dimensions:
7.36(w) x 10.24(h) x 1.79(d)

Related Subjects

What People are saying about this

Jonathan A. Campbell
I can't think of two better persons to take on the daunting task of preparing a book on the snakes of Texas. . . . This book was obviously a labor of love and the culmination of many years of effort by both authors.
Jonathan A. Campbell, Professor of Biology, University of Texas at Arlington

Meet the Author

John E. Werler retired in 1992 from the Houston Zoological Gardens, where he served for thirty-six years, first as general curator and later as general manager.

James R. Dixon is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >