Overview

Text and Image in Modern European Culture is a collection of essays that are transnational and interdisciplinary in scope. Employing a range of innovative comparative approaches to reassess and undermine traditional boundaries between art forms and national cultures, the contributors shed new light on the relations between literature and the visual arts in Europe after 1850. Following tenets of comparative cultural studies, work presented in this volume explores international creative dialogues between writers ...
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Text and Image in Modern European Culture

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Overview

Text and Image in Modern European Culture is a collection of essays that are transnational and interdisciplinary in scope. Employing a range of innovative comparative approaches to reassess and undermine traditional boundaries between art forms and national cultures, the contributors shed new light on the relations between literature and the visual arts in Europe after 1850. Following tenets of comparative cultural studies, work presented in this volume explores international creative dialogues between writers and visual artists, ekphrasis in literature, literature and design (fashion, architecture), hybrid texts (visual poetry, surrealist pocket museums, poetic photo-texts), and text and image relations under the impact of modern technologies (avant-garde experiments, digital poetry). The discussion encompasses pivotal fin de siècle, modernist, and postmodernist works and movements in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Russia, and Spain. A selected bibliography of work published in the field is also included. The volume will appeal to scholars of comparative literature, art history, and visual studies, and it includes contributions appropriate for supplementary reading in senior undergraduate and graduate seminars.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781612492421
  • Publisher: Purdue University Press
  • Publication date: 10/18/2012
  • Series: Comparative Cultural Studies
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 225
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Natasha Grigorian is a Research Associate at the University of Vienna. She taught at the University of Cambridge as the Rutherford Research Fellow in Comparative Literature. In her research, Grigorian focuses on European Symbolism and its legacy. She is the author of numerous articles on fin de siècle literature and art, and her single-authored book European Symbolism: In Search of Myth (1860-1910) appeared in 2009.

Thomas Baldwin is Senior Lecturer in French and Co-Director of the Centre for Modern European Literature at the University of Kent. His publications include The Material Object in the Work of Marcel Proust (2005), The Flesh in the Text (co-edited with James Fowler and Shane Weller, 2007), and The Picture as Spectre in Diderot, Proust, and Deleuze (2011).

Margaret Rigaud-Drayton teaches French literature at Christ’s College, University of Cambridge. She is the author of Henri Michaux: Poetry, Painting, and the Universal Sign (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005), as well as related articles on Michaux and aspects of twentieth-century French and Belgian word and image texts. She is currently working on a study of hybrid verbal and visual self-portraits from Gauguin to Surrealism.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction to Text and Image in Modern European Culture Robert Lethbridge 1

Part 1 Cross-Cultural Networks

The Myth of Psyche in the Work of D'Annunzio and Burne-Jones Giuliana Pieri 15

The Symbolist Context of the Siren Motif in Moreau's Painting and Bryusov's Poetry Natasha Grigorian 32

Images of Paris in the Work of Brassaï and Miller Caroline Blinder 48

Part 2 Ekphrasis and Beyond

The Reciprocation of the Image in Two Poems by Rilke William Waters 63

Photography and Painting in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu Thomas Baldwin 76

Photography in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu Áine Larkin 88

Part 3 Text and Design

Text and Image in Fashion Periodicals of the Second French Empire Kate Nelson Best 101

Architecture and Utopia in Scheerbart's Rakkó der Billionär Christine Angela Knoop 115

Part 4 Hybrid Texts

Word and Image in Apollinaire's "Lettre-Océan" Margaret Rigaud-Drayton 133

Text-Image Relations in French and Spanish Surrealist Literary Reviews from the 1920s and 1930s Alicia Kent 143

How to Read a Poetic Photo-Text Joanna Madloch 157

Part 5 Multimedia Encounters

Constructivist and Futurist Multimedia Experiments in Russian Poetry Svetlana Nikitina 173

Science and Symptom from Mallarmé to the Digital Poet Emile Fromet de Rosnay 184

Part 6 Thematic Bibliography

Bibliography for the Study of Text and Image in Modern European Culture Natasha Grigorian 201

Index 213

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