Textbook of Medical Physiology: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access / Edition 11

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Overview

Physiology's classic text continues to uphold its rich tradition—presenting key physiology concepts in a remarkably clear and engaging manner. Guyton & Hall's Textbook of Medical Physiology covers all of the major systems in the human body, while emphasizing system interaction, homeostasis, and pathophysiology. This very readable, easy-to-follow, and thoroughly updated, 11th Edition features a new full-color layout, short chapters, clinical vignettes, and shaded summary tables that allow for easy comprehension of the material.

The smart way to study!
Elsevier titles with STUDENT CONSULT will help you master difficult concepts and study more efficiently in print and online! Perform rapid searches. Integrate bonus content from other disciplines. Download text to your handheld device. And a lot more. Each STUDENT CONSULT title comes with full text online, a unique image library, case studies, USMLE style questions, and online note-taking to enhance your learning experience.

• Presents short, easy-to-read chapters in keeping with the Guyton and Hall tradition.

• Provides shaded summary tables for easy reference.

• Includes clinical vignettes, which allow readers to see core concepts applied to real-life situations.

• Offers specific discussions of pathophysiology in most clinical areas of medicine.

• Ensures a strong grasp of physiology concepts through well-illustrated discussions of the most essential principles.

• Now in full color!

• Offers access to the full text and other valuable features online via the STUDENT CONSULT website.

• Uses full-color illustrations throughout, including 486 figures, 277 charts and graphs, 100 brand-new line drawings, and 36 ECGs.

• Features a new full-color design that makes information more engaging and even easier to read.

• Updated throughout to reflect the latest knowledge in the field.

The book contains predominantly two-color illustrations, with some black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Robert W. Teel
This is the tenth revision of a comprehensive and thorough coverage of human physiology. The current edition has evolved over 50 years with only minor refinements appearing in the latest revision. The same number of units and chapters appear in this newest edition as in the previous one, and there are about 80 fewer pages, updated from 1996. This useful format provides an in-depth textbook in medical physiology for students. It can also serve as a useful reference source for teachers and practicing healthcare professionals. The text is appropriate for upper division majors in physiology but is of particular value to medical students and graduate students in physiology. Physiology of the major systems of the human body are covered, with a special emphasis on homeostasis and interaction of systems. Readability continues to be a strength. The index is thorough and very useful. The cardiovascular and renal sections are particularly well done. The section on aviation, space, and deep-sea physiology is a plus. This latest edition is not much different than the previous one. Print may be easier to read and red boxes around figure numbers focuses attention. I had difficulty noting any significant difference in material content; the differences seem mostly cosmetic. I actually prefer the format of the ninth edition. This text still lacks the strength of some other texts where more specialists have authored chapters specific to their areas of expertise. Figures lack the flair of other texts, but understand that this minimizes publication costs.
John G. Wood
This is the ninth edition of a highly successful textbook of medical physiology, in which physiological concepts are described in a comprehensive, organized manner from the cellular level to integrated systems. . According to the authors, the goals are to emphasize integrated physiology and homeostatic mechanisms and be as accurate as possible. These are clearly worthy objectives, and I believe this is a valuable resource for teaching medical physiology. In general, the book adequately fulfills the authors' objectives. The authors indicate that it is written primarily for medical students, and I agree. They are highly respected physiologists who have made many significant contributions to this field. I found very few (if any) new figures in the chapters on the gastrointestinal system, compared with the previous edition. The references have been updated in the gastrointestinal sections, but I found few changes in the text of this revision. Based upon close reading of the chapters of the gastrointestinal system, there appears to have been little revision of the text in this version. Recent references have been added to the chapters, yet I did not find this material to have been incorporated into the text. Although the book is overall of high quality, I did not see sufficient changes to justify the purchase of this revision.
From The Critics
Reviewer: John G. Wood, PhD (University of Kansas Medical Center)
Description: This is the ninth edition of a highly successful textbook of medical physiology, in which physiological concepts are described in a comprehensive, organized manner from the cellular level to integrated systems. .
Purpose: According to the authors, the goals are to emphasize integrated physiology and homeostatic mechanisms and be as accurate as possible. These are clearly worthy objectives, and I believe this is a valuable resource for teaching medical physiology. In general, the book adequately fulfills the authors' objectives.
Audience: The authors indicate that it is written primarily for medical students, and I agree. They are highly respected physiologists who have made many significant contributions to this field.
Features: I found very few (if any) new figures in the chapters on the gastrointestinal system, compared with the previous edition. The references have been updated in the gastrointestinal sections, but I found few changes in the text of this revision.
Assessment: Based upon close reading of the chapters of the gastrointestinal system, there appears to have been little revision of the text in this version. Recent references have been added to the chapters, yet I did not find this material to have been incorporated into the text. Although the book is overall of high quality, I did not see sufficient changes to justify the purchase of this revision.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780721602400
  • Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
  • Publication date: 6/30/2005
  • Series: Guyton Physiology Series
  • Edition description: With STUDENT CONSULT Access
  • Edition number: 11
  • Pages: 1152
  • Product dimensions: 8.76 (w) x 11.20 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

John E. Hall, Ph.D.
Arthur C. Guyton Professor and Chair
Department of Physiology & Biophysics
Associate Vice Chancellor for Research
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Jackson, MS 39216-4505
601-984-1801
jehall@umc.edu

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Table of Contents

UNIT I: Introduction to Physiology: The Cell and General Physiology

CHAPTER 1: Functional Organization of the Human Body, and Control of the "Internal Environment" Cells as the Living Units of the Body
CHAPTER 2: The Cell and Its Functions
CHAPTER 3: Genetic Control of Protein Synthesis, Cell Function, and Cell Reproduction

UNIT II: Membrane Physiology, Nerve, and Muscle

CHAPTER 4: Transport of Substances Through the Cell Membrane
CHAPTER 5: Membrane Potentials and Action Potentials
CHAPTER 6: Contraction of Skeletal Muscle
CHAPTER 7: Excitation of Skeletal Muscle: A. Neuromuscular Transmission and
B. Excitation-Contraction Coupling
CHAPTER 8: Contraction and Excitation of Smooth Muscle

UNIT III: The Heart

CHAPTER 9: Heart Muscle; The Heart as a Pump and Function of the Heart Valves
CHAPTER 10: Rhythmical Excitation of the Heart
CHAPTER 11: The Normal Electrocardiogram
CHAPTER 12: Electrocardiographic Interpretation of Cardiac Muscle and Coronary Blood Flow Abnormalities: Vectorial Analysis
CHAPTER 13: Cardiac Arrhythmias and Their Electrocardiographic Interpretation

UNIT IV: The Circulation

CHAPTER 14: Overview of the Circulation; Medical Physics of Pressure, Flow, and Resistance
CHAPTER 15: Vascular Distensibility, and Functions of the Arterial and Venous Systems
CHAPTER 16: The Microcirculation and the Lymphatic System: Capillary Fluid Exchange,
Interstitial Fluid, and Lymph Flow
CHAPTER 17: Local Control of Blood Flow by the Tissues; and Humoral Regulation
CHAPTER 18: Nervous Regulation of the Circulation, and Rapid Control of Arterial Pressure
CHAPTER 19: Dominant Role of the Kidney in Long-Term Regulation of Arterial Pressure and in Hypertension: The Integrated System for Pressure Control
CHAPTER 20: Cardiac Output, Venous Return, and Their Regulation
CHAPTER 21: Muscle Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Exercise; the Coronary
Circulation and Ischemic Heart Disease
CHAPTER 22: Cardiac Failure
CHAPTER 23: Heart Valves and Heart Sounds; Dynamics of Valvular and Congenital Heart Defects
CHAPTER 24: Circulatory Shock and Physiology of its Treatment

UNIT V: The Body Fluids and Kidneys

CHAPTER 25: The Body Fluid Compartments: Extracellular and Intracellular Fluids;
Interstitial Fluid and Edema
CHAPTER 26: Urine Formation by the Kidneys: I. Glomerular Filtration, Renal Blood Flow, and Their Control
CHAPTER 27: Urine Formation by the Kidneys: II. Tubular Processing of the Glomerular Filtrate
CHAPTER 28: Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Osmolarity and Sodium Concentration
CHAPTER 29: Renal Regulation of Potassium, Calcium, Phosphate, and Magnesium; Integration of
Renal Mechanisms for Control of Blood Volume and Extracellular Fluid Volume
CHAPTER 30: Regulation of Acid-Base Balance
CHAPTER 31: Kidney Diseases and Diuretics

UNIT VI: Blood Cells, Immunity, and Blood Clotting

CHAPTER 32: Red Blood Cells, Anemia, and Polycythemia
CHAPTER 33: Resistance of the Body to Infection: I. Leukocytes, Granulocytes, the Monocyte-Macrophage System, and Inflammation
CHAPTER 34: Resistance of the Body to Infection: II. Immunity and Allergy
CHAPTER 35: Blood Groups; Transfusion; Tissue and Organ Transplantation
CHAPTER 36: Hemostasis and Blood Coagulation

UNIT VII: Respiration

CHAPTER 37: Pulmonary Ventilation
CHAPTER 38: Pulmonary Circulation; Pulmonary Edema; Pleural Fluid
CHAPTER 39: Physical Principles of Gas Exchange; Diffusion of Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Through the Respiratory Membrane
CHAPTER 40: Transport of Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide in the Blood and Body Fluids
CHAPTER 41: Regulation of Respiration
CHAPTER 42: Respiratory Insufficiency—Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Oxygen Therapy

UNIT VIII: Aviation, Space, and Deep-Sea Diving Physiology

CHAPTER 43: Aviation, High-Altitude, and Space Physiology
CHAPTER 44: Physiology of Deep-Sea Diving and Other Hyperbaric Conditions

UNIT IX: The Nervous System: A. General Principles and Sensory Physiology

CHAPTER 45: Organization of the Nervous System; Basic Functions of Synapses; “Transmitter Substances”
CHAPTER 46: Sensory Receptors; Neuronal Circuits for Processing Information
CHAPTER 47: Somatic Sensations: I. General Organization; the Tactile and Position Senses
CHAPTER 48: Somatic Sensations: II. Pain, Headache, and Thermal Sensations

UNIT X: The Nervous System: B. The Special Senses

CHAPTER 49: The Eye: I. Optics of Vision
CHAPTER 50: The Eye II. Receptor and Neural Function of the Retina
CHAPTER 51: The Eye III. Central Neurophysiology of Vision
CHAPTER 52: The Sense of Hearing
CHAPTER 53: The Chemical Senses—Taste and Smell

UNIT XI: The Nervous System: C. Motor and Integrative Neurophysiology

CHAPTER 54: Motor Functions of the Spinal Cord; The Cord Reflexes
CHAPTER 55: Cortical and Brain Stem Control of Motor Function
CHAPTER 56: The Cerebellum, the Basal Ganglia, and Overall Motor Control
CHAPTER 57: The Cerebral Cortex; Intellectual Functions of the Brain; and Learning and Memory
CHAPTER 58: Behavioral and Motivational Mechanisms of the Brain—The Limbic System and the Hypothalamus
CHAPTER 59: States of Brain Activity—Sleep; Brain Waves; Epilepsy; Psychoses
CHAPTER 60: The Autonomic Nervous System; and the Adrenal Medulla
CHAPTER 61: Cerebral Blood Flow; the Cerebrospinal Fluid; and Brain Metabolism

UNIT XII: Gastrointestinal Physiology

CHAPTER 62: General Principles of Gastrointestinal Function—Motility, Nervous Control, and Blood Circulation
CHAPTER 63: Propulsion and Mixing of Food in the Alimentary Tract
CHAPTER 64: Secretory Functions of the Alimentary Tract
CHAPTER 65: Digestion and Absorption in the Gastrointestinal Tract
CHAPTER 66: Physiology of Gastrointestinal Disorders

UNIT XIII: Metabolism and Temperature Regulation
CHAPTER 67: Metabolism of Carbohydrates, and Formation of Adenosine Triphosphate

CHAPTER 68: Lipid Metabolism
CHAPTER 69: Protein Metabolism
CHAPTER 70: The Liver as an Organ
CHAPTER 71: Dietary Balances; Regulation of Feeding; Obesity and Starvation; Vitamins and Minerals
CHAPTER 72: Energetics and Metabolic Rate
CHAPTER 73: Body Temperature, Temperature Regulation, and Fever

UNIT XIV: Endocrinology and Reproduction

CHAPTER 74: Introduction to Endocrinology
CHAPTER 75: The Pituitary Hormones and Their Control by the Hypothalamus
CHAPTER 76: The Thyroid Metabolic Hormones
CHAPTER 77: The Adrenocortical Hormones
CHAPTER 78: Insulin, Glucagon, and Diabetes Mellitus
CHAPTER 79: Parathyroid Hormone, Calcitonin, Calcium and Phosphate Metabolism, Vitamin D, Bone, and Teeth
CHAPTER 80: Reproductive and Hormonal Functions of the Male (and Function of the Pineal Gland)
CHAPTER 81: Female Physiology Before Pregnancy; and the Female Hormones
CHAPTER 82: Pregnancy and Lactation
CHAPTER 83: Fetal and Neonatal Physiology
UNIT XV: Sports Physiology
CHAPTER 84: Sports Physiology

Index

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Preface

We come now to the tenth edition of the Textbook of Medical Physiology. Publication of this book has continued long beyond what we expected when its first edition was written almost 50 years ago. Yet, the project becomes more exciting each year, especially because our increasing knowledge of physiology unravels many new bodily mysteries.

Most important, many new techniques for learning about cellular and molecular physiology have been developed recently. Therefore, more and more can we present physiologic principles in the terminology of molecular and physical science rather than merely as a series of separate unexplained biological phenomena. This change we all welcome, but it also makes revision of almost every section of each chapter a necessity.

To help in this job of revision, Dr. John Hall joined as coauthor in preparing the ninth edition of the Textbook of Medical Physiology. In the tenth edition he has doubled the number of chapters for which he is primarily responsible.

The two of us, Drs. Guyton and Hall, have worked very closely together for more than 25 years, so it has been possible to maintain a unified organization of the text that is especially useful to students, yet at the same time keeps the book comprehensive enough that students will wish to use it in later life as a basis for professional careers. As can be expected, Dr. Hall has brought many new insights and new bodies of knowledge that have helped immensely in achieving these goals.

The beauty of studying human physiology is that it integrates the individual functions of all the body's different organs and cells into a functional whole, the human body. Indeed, life relies uponthis total function, not on function of individual body parts in isolation from the others.

This brings us to another subject: How are the separate organs and systems controlled so that no one overfunctions while others fail to do their share? Fortunately, our bodies are endowed with a vast network of feedback controls that achieve the necessary balances without which we would not be able to live. Physiologists call this high level of internal bodily control homeostasis. In disease states, functional balances are often seriously disturbed-that is, homeostasis becomes very poor. And, when even a single disturbance reaches a limit, the whole body can no longer live. Therefore, one of the principal goals of any medical physiology text is to emphasize the effectiveness and beauty of the body's homeostasis mechanisms as well as to present their abnormal function in disease.

Another goal of this text is to be as accurate as possible. Suggestions and critiques from many physiologists, students, and clinicians throughout the world have been sought and then used for checking factual accuracy as well as balance in the text. Even so, because of the likelihood of error in sorting through thousands of bits of information, we wish to issue still a further invitation-in fact, much more than merely an invitation, actually a request-to all readers to send along notations of error or inaccuracy. Indeed, physiologists perhaps as much as any other scholars understand how important feedback is to proper function of the human body; so, too, is feedback important for progressive development of a textbook of physiology. To those many persons who have already helped, we send our sincerest thanks.

A word of explanation is needed about two features of the text-first, the references, and second, the two print sizes. The sources referenced have been chosen primarily for their presentation of physiologic principles and for the quality of their own references. Use of these, as well as cross-references from them, can give the student almost complete coverage of the entire field of physiology.

The print is set in two sizes. The material in small print is of several different kinds: first, anatomical, chemical, and other information that is needed for immediate discussion but that most students will learn in more detail in other courses; second, physiologic information of special importance to certain fields of clinical medicine; and, third, information that will be of value to those students who may wish to study particular physiologic mechanisms more deeply.

In contrast, the material in large print constitutes the fundamental physiologic information that students will require in virtually all their medical activities and studies.

Again, we wish to express our deepest appreciation to many other persons who have helped in preparing this book. We are particularly grateful to Ivadelle Osberg Heidke, Gwendolyn Harris, and Gerry McAlpin for their excellent secretarial services; to Tomika Mita, Michael Schenk, Angela Gardner, and Myriam Kirkman for their superb work and helpfulness with the illustrations; and to the staff of W.B. Saunders Company for continued editorial and production excellence.

Arthus C. Guyton

John E. Hall

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2006

    A top-notch text and resource

    This textbook, though not the best literal reference, is incredibly informative and user-friendly. Although it is primarily intended for medical students, in the hands of an advanced and ambitious pre-med it would prove an invaluable resource in preparing for medical school. However, much of the more basic anatomy and physiology is assumed a priori knowledge, so if you are a pre-med keep your medical dictionary handy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2006

    i use it.isnt it enough for u to convince.

    its a good book.not a reference but a textbook 4 med students.some topics r less explained.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted August 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted January 12, 2009

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    Posted August 29, 2009

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    Posted August 10, 2009

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