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Thank You for Being Such a Pain: Spiritual Guidance for Dealing with Difficult People
     

Thank You for Being Such a Pain: Spiritual Guidance for Dealing with Difficult People

by Mark Rosen
 

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With wisdom and humor, Thank You for Being Such a Pain offers gentle and compassionate guidance for understanding and healing relationships with difficult people. By embracing four fundamental premises and putting into practice the author's many helpful and practical suggestions, you'll acquire the skills and insights necessary for turning around even the most

Overview

With wisdom and humor, Thank You for Being Such a Pain offers gentle and compassionate guidance for understanding and healing relationships with difficult people. By embracing four fundamental premises and putting into practice the author's many helpful and practical suggestions, you'll acquire the skills and insights necessary for turning around even the most troublesome relationship. What you need to keep in mind is that: (1) nothing in your life happens randomly and your difficulties have a deeper purpose; (2) frustration and even emotional pain are as necessary for your personal and spiritual growth as love and joy; (3) transforming enmity and completing unfinished business may be the most important skills you can learn in life; and (4) when you make an effort to work on your inner self, your outer relationships will be transformed.
        
This groundbreaking book draws upon state-of-the-art psychological principles and timeless spiritual practices from all traditions. Filled with enlightening exercises and entertaining stories, Thank You for Being Such a Pain will forever change the way you see the difficult people in your life . . . as well as the way you see yourself.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This book will change your life. Rosen shows you how to perform a miracle and live so that difficult people stop weakening you and start making you stronger, better, and happier."
--Charles Foster, Ph.D., Psychotherapist and Author of There's Something I Have to Tell You
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
It may seem impossible, or even undesirable, to generate a feeling of gratitude toward the people who make our lives miserable, but management consultant Rosen makes a convincing case for using the difficulties they engender as "one of our most important life lessons." He draws on Eastern and Jewish mystical doctrines that teach that "life is like a school" and "conflicts that seem to be chance occurrences are actually orchestrated for our spiritual development." Difficult individuals, whether they be relatives, bosses, co-workers, neighbors or clerks, can be seen as "teachers" delivering "a divine kick in the spiritual butt." What's more, Rosen states, "the Universe delivers unto us the ideal foe, a person whose characteristics exactly correspond to the places within us that need learning and healing." If we don't learn the lessons they bring, similar problems will perpetually resurface until we do. In a clear, conversational tone, Rosen covers seemingly every possible reason, response, interpretation and lesson that can be attached to unpleasant relationships. They can serve as mirrors, wake-up calls or chances to stand up for ourselves or to become more forgiving. They can help us develop "latent qualities," rectify the past or prepare for the future. With quotes, summaries and exercises throughout this thoughtful book, Rosen thoroughly explores new ways to view personal conflicts and to use them for healing. (Mar.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780609804148
Publisher:
Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony
Publication date:
04/28/1999
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
632,807
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Mark I. Rosen, Ph.D., has been a teacher, management consultant, and workshop leader since 1980. He currently specializes in interpersonal conflict and communication. Rosen received his Ph.D. in industrial relations from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is an adjunct professor at Bentley College in the Boston area. Recently, he has been studying Jewish approaches to healing and served as the program director for the Jewish Healing Center of New England.

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