Thanks to the Animals

Thanks to the Animals

5.0 2
by Allen Sockabasin, Rebekah Raye
     
 

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Little Zoo Sap and his family are moving from their summer home on the coast to the deep woods for the winter, traveling on a big bobsled pulled by big horses. When Zoo Sap falls off of the sled unnoticed, the forest animals hear his cries and come to shelter him-everyone from the tiny mouse to the giant moose to the great bald eagle-keeping him warm and safe until…  See more details below

Overview

Little Zoo Sap and his family are moving from their summer home on the coast to the deep woods for the winter, traveling on a big bobsled pulled by big horses. When Zoo Sap falls off of the sled unnoticed, the forest animals hear his cries and come to shelter him-everyone from the tiny mouse to the giant moose to the great bald eagle-keeping him warm and safe until his father comes back to find him.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
What would it take for a young child to survive for one day in the winter world of the Maine woods? This title answers this question in a heartwarming tale of Zoo Sap, a lost baby who is warmed and protected by woodland animals until his father returns to find him. Joo Tum prepares to move his family to their winter home by loading them onto a huge sled used to transport all they own. His youngest child, Zoo Sap, is tucked into a place on the sled but falls off into the snow as they travel without his family realizing he is gone. All alone in the snow, Zoo Sap gets cold and begins to cry. Woodland animals, such as the moose and muskrat, hear Zoo Sap's cries and come to curl around him to keep him warm. More animals arrive and surround Zoo Sap, keeping him warm and snug until his father returns in the evening to rescue him. Joo Tum thanks the animals and takes Zoo Sap home. The story is beautiful but abrupt language and lack of description makes it difficult to understand. The author often uses short sentences, such as "Everyone helped" or "Zoo Sap stayed warm," which disrupt the otherwise soothing rhythm and gentle flow of the story. Descriptions such as how the eagle spreads his wings over the pile of animals are excellent, but it does not go into detail about how the animals keep the child warm or how they work together to make sure Zoo Sap survives. It does not mention anything about whether or not the animals feed Zoo Sap or provide him any other comfort. Surprisingly, it takes the full day for Joo Tum to realize his son is missing. This is a pleasant narrative that with slightly more depth and detail would make a wonderful children's tale on a snowy winter night. It is a warm storyfilled with descriptions and colorful paintings that being the adventures of a lost Passamoquody baby to life. 2005, Tilbury House, Ages 3 up.
—Caitlyn Payne
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-As the cold weather sets in, Joo Tum and his family dismantle their log house, load their bobsled, and prepare to move north "to their winter home in the deep woods." Squirrels, birds, and rabbits look on benevolently. When all is ready, the family nestles into a heap of sealskin coats and blankets, and they set off. While the other children sleep, baby Zoo Sap falls off the sled and is left behind. His frantic cries soon alert the animals of the forest, who gather around him in a warm, loving nest of fur and feathers. Before long, Joo Tum notices that the baby is missing, and walks all night to retrieve his son. Sockabasin weaves a powerful story of paternal love while simultaneously expressing the mutual respect between his Passamaquoddy culture and the natural world. His spare, straightforward prose calls to mind the gentle rhythm of a well-worn family bedtime story. Raye's luminous watercolor-and-ink paintings evoke the wintry majesty of rural Maine. Facial expressions are captured with warmth and subtlety as the family members experience excitement, fear, relief, and joy. In addition to being a lovely story, Thanks to the Animals gives a fascinating glimpse into a culture not often seen in picture books. An author's note provides further information about the Passamaquoddy tribe, including the names for the animals introduced in the book.-Rachael Vilmar, Atlanta Fulton Public Library, GA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Joseph Bruchac
“This delightful story is wonderful example of both the subtle directness and the deep awareness of our relation to the natural world that characterizes the very best American Indian traditional storytelling. Allen’s voice is both gentle and strong. I can’t think of a book I could recommend more highly for anyone who wants to give a young reader a true picture of the
Native way of seeing, teaching, and understanding.”
Multicultural Review
“…a perfect bedtime story.”
Native Peoples
“Sockabasin’s tale is richly delineated by Raye’s evocative images. A tale for the seasons!”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780884482703
Publisher:
Tilbury House Publishers
Publication date:
07/28/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD700L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 Years

What People are saying about this

Charlotte Agell
This book is a joy to read-a hymn to the wild world, sung in warm illustrations, told in the most reassuring of words.
—(Charlotte Agell, author of Dancing Feet)
Joseph Bruchac
Allen's voice is both gentle and strong. I can't think of a book I could recommend more highly for anyone who wants to give a young reader a true picture of the Native way of seeing, teaching, and understanding.
—(Joseph Bruchac, author of Jim Thorpe's Bright Path)

Meet the Author

Allen Sockabasin is a Passamaquoddy who devotes much of his time to teaching and preserving the Passamaquoddy language. A master musician, he has written, performed,
and recorded Passamaquoddy stories and songs.
He has been a tribal governor, a member of the tribal council, director of child welfare for his tribe, and a health educator. In 2010, he received the Sampson Center
Catalyst for Change Award, which recognizes those who work for human and civil rights in Maine. His is the father of five grown children and a young son named
Zoo Sap.

Rebekah Raye is an artist beloved for her bird and animal paintings and sculpture,
derived from her affinity with the natural world around her studio in East Blue
Hill, Maine. In Rebekah’s words, “My early interest in animals of all kinds continues to be the focus of

my painting and sculpture. Our pet chickens, geese, and cats—as well as the wild fox, bobcat,

crows, and deer—are my inspiration. The more I learn about the animals I
paint, the more I understand how we are all related.” Rebekah’s award-winning children’s books include The Very Best
Bed, Bear-ly There, The Secret Pool, and Swimming Home, all published by Tilbury House.

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