That New Animal

That New Animal

4.0 1
by Emily Jenkins, Pierre Pratt
     
 

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A new baby changes everything . . . for two dogs

FudgeFudge does not like that new animal. Marshmallow does not like it either. Not even a little bit. So begins this forthright, hilarious, and boldly illustrated story about two dogs that see the arrival of a new baby as a huge problem. They don't like the way that new animal smells or the way the people

Overview

A new baby changes everything . . . for two dogs

FudgeFudge does not like that new animal. Marshmallow does not like it either. Not even a little bit. So begins this forthright, hilarious, and boldly illustrated story about two dogs that see the arrival of a new baby as a huge problem. They don't like the way that new animal smells or the way the people just sit and stare at it, forgetting all about FudgeFudge and Marshmallow. They have to do something about it, but what? Then one morning a stranger named Grandpa arrives, and he wants to hold that new animal. Instantly FudgeFudge and Marshmallow know they can't allow that. Why? they ask each other. Because, by now, that new animal has become their new animal.

A picture book that speaks with wise and knowing humor to every parent and child who has welcomed or resisted an addition to the family.

That New Animal is a 2005 Boston Globe - Horn Book Award Honor Book for Picture Books.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Pratt quirkily illustrates the droll canine point of view with thickly colored, soft-edged brush strokes. Spare facial lines comically express canine and baby reactions. These two will fetch delight in Jenkins's clever take on new arrivals.” —Starred, Kirkus Reviews

“Jenkins...is quietly making a career...as one of the freshest, most evocative, and most accessible picture-book writers of family life. Pratt's paintings are suffused with warm tones and furry-textured brush strokes that comfort even during the dogs' anxious moments. The book's unerring identification of the sore spots of dethronement...will definitely strike chords of recognition in young audiences.” —Starred, The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

“Jenkins's funny and well-paced text flows smoothly.” —Starred, The Horn Book

“This delightful twist on the frequently explored topic of pets displaced by infants will tickle children's funny bones. Both the author and illustrator demonstrate wonderful insight into pet psychology and family dynamics, and the elongated style of the vibrantly colored artwork strikes just the right note of humor and whimsy.” —Starred, School Library Journal

“Jenkins's gift for melding irony with empathy results in the kind of resonant and quotable text that youngsters will demand to hear again and again. Pratt's wry paintings are in perfect sync. Will strike a chord with any child who's ever wondered how soon that new baby can go back to the hospital.” —Starred, Publishers Weekly

School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-This delightful twist on the frequently explored topic of pets displaced by infants will tickle children's funny bones. The story is told from the points of view of the descriptively named Marshmallow and FudgeFudge. This doggie duo dislikes the intruder in their home, whom they refer to as "that new animal." While their people once used to dote on them, they now devote precious play and belly-scratching time to that funny-smelling newborn. When their humans even dare to scold the two for whining and barking, FudgeFudge comes up with a number of solutions to get rid of the newcomer. She suggests eating it, burying it with their bones, and lying on top of it, but settles for chewing up a few books and dolls. Tired of being the pair's more mature voice of reason, Marshmallow expresses his displeasure by peeing on the carpet. A visit from Grandpa puts matters in a new light as the suddenly protective dogs reason that "It is our new animal to hate as much as we want to," but Grandpa better not try to pick up the baby. Both the author and illustrator demonstrate wonderful insight into pet psychology and family dynamics, and the elongated style of the vibrantly colored artwork strikes just the right note of humor and whimsy.-Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Fudge Fudge and Marshmallow do not like the new animal, not one bit. Their people stop throwing sticks and tossing balls to the two dogs just so they can sit and look at the new animal, even kissing "it" when it cries. The dogs consider eating it, burying it, and sleeping on top of it in the cradle; then, someone else arrives, called Grandpa. Just like the new animal, he smells differently from dogs, but when he tries to pick "it" up, the dogs bark loudly; after all, it's not his new animal, it's theirs, "to hate as much as want to." As the new animal (a baby, of course) crawls its way into the dogs' hearts, they realize they can like "it" just a bit after all. Jenkins quirkily illustrates the droll canine point of view with thickly colored, soft-edged broad strokes. The elongated humans reflect canine perspective and doughish-shaped heads while spare facial lines comically express canine and baby reactions. These two will fetch delight in Jenkins's clever take on new arrivals. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374374433
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux (Byr)
Publication date:
03/10/2005
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,146,358
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 11.30(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Emily Jenkins is the author of several picture books, including Daffodil and Five Creatures, an ALA Notable Book. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Pierre Pratt haswritten and/or illustrated many books for children. He lives in Montreal, Canada.

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That New Animal 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
FudgeFudge and Marshmallow ruled the roost, more or less. They received a great deal of attention from the man and woman to whom they belonged, so basically they were two happy dogs. That is until a new animal came to live at their house. They do not like this intruder one bit. For starters, he didn't smell at all like a dog, and people didn't play with them any more - no sticks to chase or tossed balls to run after. People just sat and looked at the new animal. The intruder took FudgeFudge's spot on the couch, and no one even noticed that Marshmallow was showing his tummy, ready to be scratched. To add insult to injury, when Marshmallow whines, someone tells him to be quiet. And, when FudgeFudge barks, he's sent to the corner. But, when the new animal cries it is cuddled and kissed. How ridiculous! Of course, the new animal is a baby. The two dogs simply do not know how to deal with this member of the family. It takes a visit from Grandpa to straighten things out. Youngsters will laugh at the dogs' reaction to the baby, and many will probably relate to the changes that occur when a new person joins the family. - Gail Cooke