That Old-Time Religion in Modern America: Evangelical Protestantism in the Twentieth Century

That Old-Time Religion in Modern America: Evangelical Protestantism in the Twentieth Century

by D. G. Hart
     
 
Although evangelicals entered the century as full partners in the Protestant denominations and agencies that molded American cultural and intellectual life, since the 1970s evangelical Protestantism has been perceived as alien to other Americans. Mr. Hart unpacks evangelicalism's current reputation by tracing its development over the course of the twentieth century.

Overview

Although evangelicals entered the century as full partners in the Protestant denominations and agencies that molded American cultural and intellectual life, since the 1970s evangelical Protestantism has been perceived as alien to other Americans. Mr. Hart unpacks evangelicalism's current reputation by tracing its development over the course of the twentieth century. An excellent interpretive synthesis. —Leo P. Ribuffo

Editorial Reviews

Journal of Presbyterian History
Hart delivers a wonderfully readable narrative of twentieth-century evangelicalism...a rich and thoughtful introduction to a fertile religious tradition.
The Washington Times - Terry Eastland
Not until the 1960s however, did evangelicals start to engage culture. They, did so D.G. Hart explains, in respons to well-known secularizing trends.
Leo Ribuffo
No one understand the history of evangelicalism better than D. G. Hart, and no one offers a more balanced analysis of the key issues.
Mark Noll
A mature historical account of a subject as rich as it is complex. The book is carefully learned, authoritatively balanced, and yet entirely accessible to a wide audience.
CHOICE - F. Arriola
Art has written a concise and insightful history of evangelicalism's rise, decline, and resurgence in the 20th century.
David E. Harrell
Compelling...sweeping in reach, erudite in research, and driven by an admirable appreciation for his subjects.
Anglican Theological Review - Gardiner H. Shattuck
…Both well written and intellectually substantial…. Hart has written a masterful account of modern evangelicalism.
Choice
Art has written a concise and insightful history of evangelicalism's rise, decline, and resurgence in the 20th century.
— F. Arriola
Chicago Sun-Times
Compact, instructive and well-argued.
Midwest Book Review
An excellent survey which provides much focus on 20th century evangelical effects on modern society.
Journal Of Presbyterian History
Hart delivers a wonderfully readable narrative of twentieth-century evangelicalism...a rich and thoughtful introduction to a fertile religious tradition.
New York Resident
Hart's text is wonderfully researched and historically illuminating in its blending of theological, social, and emotional experiences into a remarkable American odyssey. Even those who view Evangelicalism with skepticism or worse will find That Old-Time Religion a compelling journey to take.
Religious Studies Review
…A nice job of explaining evangelical political positions…. Suggests that the common understanding of evangelicalism...needs some revision.
Anglican Theological Review
…Both well written and intellectually substantial…. Hart has written a masterful account of modern evangelicalism.
— Gardiner H. Shattuck, Jr.
The Wall Street Journal
Well-informed, tightly written and provocative.
CHOICE
Art has written a concise and insightful history of evangelicalism's rise, decline, and resurgence in the 20th century.
— F. Arriola
The Weekly Standard
Fascinating...clearly coherent.... Hart's warnings...should be welcomed.
The Washington Times
Not until the 1960s however, did evangelicals start to engage culture. They, did so D.G. Hart explains, in respons to well-known secularizing trends.
— Terry Eastland
Washington Times
Not until the 1960s however, did evangelicals start to engage culture. They, did so D.G. Hart explains, in respons to well-known secularizing trends.
— Terry Eastland
Wall Street Journal
Well-informed, tightly written and provocative.
Weekly Standard
Fascinating...clearly coherent.... Hart's warnings...should be welcomed.
The Historian
…An excellent introduction to modern evangelicalism.
James P. Byrd
"A persuasive assessment of evangelicalism's traditionalist yet innovative presence in America."
Journal of American History
...A nice job of explaining evangelical political positions.... Suggests that the common understanding of evangelicalism...needs some revision.
MIDWEST BOOK REVIEW
An excellent survey which provides much focus on 20th century evangelical effects on modern society.
JOURNAL OF PRESBYTERIAN HISTORY
Hart delivers a wonderfully readable narrative of twentieth-century evangelicalism. A rich and thoughtful introduction to a fertile religious tradition.
JOURNAL OF AMERICAN HISTORY
...Its treatment of evangelicalism's engagement with popular culture is a timely addition to scholarship.... A persuasive assessment...
Library Journal
As demonstrated in this book by Hart (The University Gets Religion), in its great variety modern evangelicalism is beyond definition. This book presents a view of 20th-century evangelicals and how they have adapted to changes in American society. Hart's book "begins with the premise that evangelicalism is the most American version of Christianity." He shows how evangelicals, who were prominent in the formation of our early secular government, nearly vanished and became a Protestant fringe in the 1930s. Later, in the Forties, a subculture developed with a renewed evangelical worldview, which became a political force known as the religious Right. At the same time, however, evangelicals were still an awkward part of society. One evangelical element, the charismatics, succeeded in using the questionable idiom of rock music to enable them to fit into popular culture. Others adopted TV as a platform or established mega-churches and educational institutions, while some entered secular academia. Increasingly, Hart argues, evangelicals have been absorbed into society, but they find themselves uneasy in a society that has many other voices. The challenge is that America has changed, and no single religion can easily command special importance. Hart has given us a look at both the diversity and the challenges evangelicals are facing. Written for a general audience, this book is appropriate for large public libraries and for students of religion and sociology.-George Westerlund, formerly with Providence P.L. Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781566634601
Publisher:
Dee, Ivan R. Publisher
Publication date:
12/15/2002
Series:
American Ways Series
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.64(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.99(d)

What People are saying about this

Weekly Standard
Hart packs this standard outline with fascinating detail...[his] analysis is clearly coherent.
MARK NOLL
A mature historical account.... The book is carefully learned, authoritatively balanced, and yet entirely accessible to a wide audience.
DAVID E. HARRELL
Compelling...sweeping in reach, erudite in research, and driven by an admirable appreciation for his subjects.
AUBURN UNIVERSITY
Leo Ribuffo
No one understand the history of evangelicalism better than D. G. Hart, and no one offers a more balanced analysis of the key issues.
Mark Noll
A mature historical account of a subject as rich as it is complex. The book is carefully learned, authoritatively balanced, and yet entirely accessible to a wide audience.
LEO RIBUFFO
No one understands the history of evangelicalism better than D. G. Hart, and no one offers a more balanced analysis...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >