The 40-Year-Old Version

The 40-Year-Old Version

4.0 1
by Joel Schwartzberg
     
 
A comic look at how divorce reinvents relationships with kids and one's own evolving sense of Dadhood.

Joel Schwartzberg is an award-winning essayist and screenwriter, national champion public speaker and speech coach, law school drop-out, horror fan, divorced father, and former Wheel of Fortune contestant. He was Nickelodeon Online's Head Writer in 1998 and

Overview

A comic look at how divorce reinvents relationships with kids and one's own evolving sense of Dadhood.

Joel Schwartzberg is an award-winning essayist and screenwriter, national champion public speaker and speech coach, law school drop-out, horror fan, divorced father, and former Wheel of Fortune contestant. He was Nickelodeon Online's Head Writer in 1998 and founded the TIME For Kids website in 2000. Currently, he is the senior new media producer for a PBS broadcast news magazine.

Joel's essays on parenting and other spontaneous phenomena have been published in The New York Times Magazine, New Jersey Monthly, The Star-Ledger, The New York Daily News, Chicken Soup for the Divorced Soul, Babble.com, and regional parenting magazines around the U.S. and Canada. From 2005-2006, he wrote the "Grain of Salt" column for the News-Record of Maplewood and South Orange.

Joel writes exclusively during his daily train commute from New Jersey to New York City, unless he can't find a seat. At those times, he sways from side to side and reads romance novels over other peoples' shoulders.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781932279986
Publisher:
Wyatt-MacKenzie Publishing
Publication date:
06/01/2009
Pages:
156
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.33(d)

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The 40-Year-Old Version 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Clark_Kents_Lunchbox More than 1 year ago
Through his collection of short essays, Joel recreates the exhilaration, confusion, awkwardness, satisfaction, insight, and quirk in being a divorced father. Stories like "Lazy Dadurday" offer a glimpse into those special moments and new routines with dad after a split, while others ("Beige Food" and "Sponge Bob Wins") are humorous commentary on the world in which his children live. Though the main theme of the book centers around fatherhood, there are several chapters that would make anyone smile, not just parents. I mean who hasn't taken their mother to the Oscars, blown off law school or been on the Wheel of Fortune? And Joel's tongue-in-cheek rants against things like the greeting card industry and parking lot etiquette are the stuff of an endearing curmudgeon in the making. But for all the fun, Humoirs is not just a bowl for sugary cereal for readers to smile over after every bite-sized chapter. Joel balances sweetness with seriousness opening up about male post-partum depression and his son's Chiari malformation diagnosis. His honesty on such weighty topics gives the book a depth that readers can sympathize with without having to give into pity. Flipping through the pages brought on an eerie familiarity, like Joel had actually been chronicling my own experiences as a newly divorced father. "It took a divorce to make me a better father," Joel states in describing how he found his "inner parent." This is the exact thought I have when spending time with my children, and it gives me a sense of comfort knowing I am well beyond the beginner level of parenting. Humoirs is not just a great read; it also gives a voice to divorced dads working without fanfare to stay involved in their children's lives. The entire review can be read at Clark Kent's Lunchbox (http://clarkkentslunchbox.blogspot.com/2009/06/humoirs-of-divorced-dad.html)