The Absent Man: The Narrative Craft of Charles W. Chesnutt

Overview


As the first African-American fiction writer to achieve a national reputation, Ohio native Charles W. Chesnutt (1858—1932) in many ways established the terms of the black literary tradition now exemplified by such writers as Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Charles Johnson.

Following the highly autobiographical nonfiction produced by Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and other slave narrative writers, Chesnutt's complex, multi-layered short fiction transformed the ...

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Overview


As the first African-American fiction writer to achieve a national reputation, Ohio native Charles W. Chesnutt (1858—1932) in many ways established the terms of the black literary tradition now exemplified by such writers as Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Charles Johnson.

Following the highly autobiographical nonfiction produced by Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and other slave narrative writers, Chesnutt's complex, multi-layered short fiction transformed the relationship between African-American writers and their readers. But despite generous praise from W. D. Howells and other important critics of his day, and from such prominent readers as William L. Andrews, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Eric Sundquist in ours, Chesnutt occupies a curiously ambiguous place in American literary history.

In The Absent Man, Charles Duncan demonstrates that Chesnutt's uneasy position in the American literary tradition can be traced to his remarkable narrative subtlety. Profoundly aware of the delicacy of his situation as a black intellectual at the turn of the century, Chesnutt infused his work with an intricate, enigmatic artistic vision that defies monolithic or unambiguously political interpretation, especially with regard to issues of race and identity that preoccupied him throughout his career.

In this first book-length study of the innovative short fiction, Duncan devotes particular attention to elucidating these sophisticated narrative strategies as the grounding for Chesnutt's inauguration of a tradition of African-American fiction.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Charles Duncan’s compelling and perceptive analysis of Chesnutt’s narrative genius will go a long way in resurrecting the reputation of a pioneering African-American writer whose work deserves more attention appreciate than it has received over the years.”

-- Robert C. Leitz, III, Literary Realism

“In this detailed and intelligent book, Charles Duncan maps out the ways in which Chesnutt expertly narrates his works to embrace a form of multiculturalism that explores the formation of identity and the preservation of genealogy and family structure. … Duncan demonstrates impressive detail in his research.”

-- Kaylen Tucker, Modern Fiction Studies

Booknews
Addressing the full range of Chesnutt's (1858-1932) short fiction, including the sixteen works collected in The Conjure Woman and The Wife of His Youth, Duncan (English, Peace College, Raleigh, North Carolina) addresses the relationship between Chesnutt's thematic designs and his sophisticated narrative presentations as well as the central role played by race in his short fiction. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780821412398
  • Publisher: Ohio University Press
  • Publication date: 1/28/1999
  • Pages: 214
  • Product dimensions: 5.81 (w) x 8.75 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author


An associate professor of English at Peace College, Raleigh, North Carolina, Charles Duncan is the author of The Absent Man: The Narrative Craft of Charles W. Chesnutt and numerous articles on American literature. He received the Charles Waddell Chesnutt Association’s Sylvia Lyons Render Award for his work in Chesnutt studies.
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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Chronology: Charles W. Chesnutt 1858-1932
1 Introduction 1
2 The White and the Black ... and the Limits of Authorship 27
3 "Through My Leafy Veil": Chesnutt's Narrative Witnesses 47
4 Negotiating Belief and Voicing Difference 77
5 Speaking For and Against Each Other: The Inside Narratives 107
6 Shortening His Weapons: The More Detached Voice of Realism 137
7 Conclusion: The Blackballing of Charles W. Chesnutt 166
Notes 177
Bibliography 197
Index 207
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