The Addicted Brain: Why We Abuse Drugs, Alcohol, and Nicotine

The Addicted Brain: Why We Abuse Drugs, Alcohol, and Nicotine

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by Michael Kuhar
     
 

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Addiction destroys lives. In The Addicted Brain, leading neuroscientist Michael Kuhar, Ph.D., explains how and why this happens–and presents advances in drug addiction treatment and prevention. Using breathtaking brain imagery and other research, Kuhar shows the powerful, long-term brain changes that drugs can cause, revealing why it can be so

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Overview

Addiction destroys lives. In The Addicted Brain, leading neuroscientist Michael Kuhar, Ph.D., explains how and why this happens–and presents advances in drug addiction treatment and prevention. Using breathtaking brain imagery and other research, Kuhar shows the powerful, long-term brain changes that drugs can cause, revealing why it can be so difficult for addicts to escape their grip.

Discover why some people are far more susceptible to addiction than others as the author illuminates striking neural similarities between drugs and other pleasures potentially capable of causing abuse or addiction–including alcohol, gambling, sex, caffeine, and even Internet overuse. Kuhar concludes by outlining the 12 characteristics most often associated with successful drug addiction treatment.

 

Authoritative and easy to understand, The Addicted Brain offers today’s most up-to-date scientific explanation of addiction–and what addicts, their families, and society can do about it.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780132616966
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
10/31/2011
Series:
FT Press Science
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
1,211,123
File size:
4 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Michael Kuhar, Ph.D., is currently a professor at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Candler professor in the Emory University School of Medicine, and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. His general interests have been the structure and function of the brain, mental illness, and the drugs that affect the brain. Addiction has been his major focus for many years, and he is one of the most productive and highly cited scientists worldwide. He has trained a large cadre of students, fellows, and visitors, received a number of prestigious awards for his work, and remains involved in many aspects of addiction research and education. In June 2011, he received the Nathan B. Eddy lifetime achievement award from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence.

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The Addicted Brain: Why We Abuse Drugs, Alcohol, and Nicotine 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I didn't know much about how addiction works before I read this book. It was an eye opener. After reading this, I will never again think addiction and habit in the same breath. Although I knew it was more than simple will power that helped a person break an addiction, I had no idea just how much more. As a smoker who has abstained from smoking for several weeks, I now know that I will have to remain on my guard for life. For me, as an addict, there's no such thing as a little puff. I don't want to go thru this again, and that little puff might be all that it takes. For those who suffer more serious addictions, I understand you better than I did, and I wish you well. If you break the back of your addiction, don't ever listen to that voice that says just a little won't hurt you. It's a lie. This was a well written book, but it's the only one of its kind I have read. Because I liked it, I gave it 3 stars. Had I read others like it, I might have thought it deserved higher, simply because it might be the best of its kind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Basically a review of a college neuroscience class. Might be interesting if you are trying too learn more about neurotransmission, but I found it to be prosaic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
very intereting reading
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