The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

4.0 328
by Mark Twain

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About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, or Mark Twain, as he was better known was born on November 30, 1835 in Florida, Missouri, the sixth child of John Marshall and Jane Lampton Clemens. His father ran a dry goods and grocery store, practiced law and involved himself in local politics after the family's move to Hannibal, Missouri, when Sam was four…  See more details below


About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, or Mark Twain, as he was better known was born on November 30, 1835 in Florida, Missouri, the sixth child of John Marshall and Jane Lampton Clemens. His father ran a dry goods and grocery store, practiced law and involved himself in local politics after the family's move to Hannibal, Missouri, when Sam was four years old.

Hannibal seems to have been a good place for a boy to grow up. Sam was entranced by the Mississippi River and enjoyed both the barges and the people who traveled on them. When Sam was just eleven his father died and Sam went to work for his brother at the Hannibal Journal first as a printer's apprentice and later a compositor. While still in his teens Sam went on the road as an itinerant printer. In 1857 he conceived a plan to seek his fortune in South America but on the way he met a steamboat captain, Horace Bixby who took him on as a cub riverboat pilot and taught him until he acquired his own license.

This enjoyable style of life, which Twain always spoke of later with special warmth was ended by the Civil War. Twain went west with his brother Orion to prospect in Nevada but in 1862 joined the staff of the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, a paper to which he had already begun submitting his work. Later Twain went to California and submitted "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" to the New York Saturday Press.

By 1871 Twain had published Innocents Abroad and had married Olivia Langdon, the sister of a friend from a socially prominent New York City family. He and his wife moved to Hartford, Connecticut, where they made their family home for thenext 20 years.

Books that he wrote in Hartford confirmed his popular reputation but despite their success Twain found himself in financial difficulty primarily because of his investments in the Paige typesetting business as well as his own publishing company. Eventually Twain was forced to declare bankruptcy.

Twain's last major books were successful commercially but they also reflect his increasing pessimism. His satire becomes at times more biting and mean-spirited than it is humorous. Despite the downturn in Twain's outlook in later life and despite the unevenness of much of his work, he remains one of the major writers of the American nineteenth century, and one who has been enormously influential on subsequent writers.

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Editorial Reviews

Ernest Hemingway
All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.
Children's Literature
What does a young boy do when he witnesses a murder but is terrified the murderer will come after him and kill him if he tells anyone what he saw? This terrible quandary is just one of the trials young Tom Sawyer and his friend Huckleberry Finn face after they see a man killed. On top of this worry about being attacked by the murderer, Tom has to deal with a meddlesome aunt, an ornery teacher, and a pretty girl who does not respond to his schoolboy affection. Quite an adventure for a boy who started his summer trying to get out of having to whitewash a picket fence! Fans of adventure stories, mystery buffs, or readers who enjoyed getting into scrapes with Tom years ago will enjoy this tale of a mischievous boy and his assorted pranks, trials, and intrigues. The book is funny, interesting, and thought provoking. Readers may be put off by archaic language and slang, but once you get beyond the printed words, Tom Sawyer is a wonderful book about a loveable boy who could not stay out of trouble. Part of the "Adventure Classics" series. 2005 (orig. 1876), HarperCollins, Ages 8 to 12.
—Caitlyn Payne
Children's Literature - Kathie M. Josephs
What a classic story. The book about Tom Sawyer is in the elite class of novels that will never fade away. Mr. Hall has taken the original story and condensed it into a graphic novel so that it can be enjoyed by a wider level and range of readers. Because this book is written in graphic form, it opens the door to reading for ESL students and reluctant readers, and provides high interest at a lower level. Young adults who want to read anything they can get their hands on will also enjoy the graphic format and fast paced text. The author includes a box on most pages that includes narration giving extra information to the reader to help with comprehension. Also helpful are the first two pages that introduce the characters by names and pictures. This is definitely an outstanding tool for helping the reader to follow the story. When Huck and Tom are hunting for a treasure and discussing what each would do with the money, Tom's friend Huck says he would buy a pie every day. I bet a lot of boys would agree with him. Included at the end of the book is further information about Tom Sawyer, "Discussion Questions," and "Writing Prompts," other books in the "Graphic Library Series," and step-by-step directions about how to use the Fact Hound web site. This web site is particularly beneficial because it is set up to allow the user to select the grade level of information they want. Every boy should read this story at least once in his life. It is also a wonderful book for a father to read with a son.
From the Publisher
"Although he does an expert job with the entire cast, [narrator William] Dufris's delivery of Jim's dialogue is his crowning achievement.…Jim's mind and heart come shining through." ---Publishers Weekly Audio Review
Forrest Robinson University of California
"Broadview's new Adventures of Huckleberry Finn answers the need for an edition of America's most popular canonical novel that provides readers—and most especially student readers at all levels—with the critical tools essential to serious inquiry. The text is reliable and beautifully produced; Stephen Railton's introduction is copious, well informed, and critically suggestive; and the several appendices, featuring a wide selection of contextual materials, nicely anticipate readers' needs.”
Eric J. Sundquist Johns Hopkins University
"This welcome new edition brings beautifully to life Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as Mark Twain conceived it. Along with the excellent critical introduction and notes, the abundant contextual materials offer a superb recreation of the historical and cultural context in which the novel was written and read.”

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Product Details

Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
Enriched Classics Series
Edition description:
Enriched Classic
Sales rank:
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 1.00(h) x 6.70(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Read an Excerpt


I Discover Moses and the Bulrushers

YOU DON'T KNOW about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly - Tom's Aunt Polly, she is - and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before.

Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece all gold. It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year round - more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer I lit out. I got into my old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So I went back.

The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and felt all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them - that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in dead people.

Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.

Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a spelling book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say, "Don't put your feet up there, Huckleberry"; and "Don't scrunch up like that, Huckleberry - set up straight"; and pretty soon she would say, "Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry - why don't you try to behave?" Then she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad then, but I didn't mean no harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn't say it for the whole world; she was going to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it would only make trouble, and wouldn't do no good.

Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn't think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.

Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. By and by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of candle, and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn't no use. I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something that's on its mind and can't make itself understood, and so can't rest easy in its grave, and has to go about that way every night grieving. I got so downhearted and scared I did wish I had some company. Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it was all shriveled up. I didn't need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me. I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn't no confidence. You do that when you've lost a horseshoe that you've found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but I hadn't ever heard anybody say it was any way to keep off bad luck when you'd killed a spider.

I set down again, a-shaking all over, and got out my pipe for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death now, and so the widow wouldn't know. Well, after a long time I heard the clock away off in the town go boom - boom - boom - twelve licks; and all still again - stiller than ever. Pretty soon I heard a twig snap down in the dark amongst the trees - something was a-stirring. I set still and listened. Directly I could just barely hear a "me-yow! me-yow!" down there. That was good! Says I, "me-yow! me-yow!" as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window on to the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in among the trees, and, sure enough, there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me.

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What People are saying about this

Ernest Hemingway
All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.
From the Publisher
"Although he does an expert job with the entire cast, [narrator William] Dufris's delivery of Jim's dialogue is his crowning achievement. . . . Jim's mind and heart come shining through." —-Publishers Weekly Audio Review
T. S. Eliot
...We come to see Huck... as one of the permanent symbolic figures of fiction; not unworthy to tak e a place with Ulysses, Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Hamlet, and other great discoveries that man has made about himself.
Lionel Trilling
One can read it at ten and then annually ever after, and each year find that it is as fresh as the year before...

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 4 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 328 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This classic of American literature is perhaps the most misunderstood and maligned book since the Bible. Nobody who has ever actually read the book could ever call it racist. True, it is filled with the 'N' word that decent people find offensive, but it was necessary in the context. This wonderful book is just as powerfully anti-slavery as 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' by Harriett Beecher Stowe, but while her book is still praised, Mark Twain's book is being banned from high school libraries. I first read this book at age 12, and have re-read it at least every two years ever since. I'm in my 40's now, but Huck and Jim take me right back to 12 every time I see them again.
3GildeRJ More than 1 year ago
"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," by Mark Twain, is a book about Huckleberry Finn, the namesake of the book. Continuing the events of the last book "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," Huck is living with widow Douglas, who has adopted him. Huck gets bored of the widow trying to civilize him, he runs out and his abusive father finds him. His father takes him in, and Huck tries to get out. He finds an old saw and cuts his way out of the house and fakes his own death. He catches a canoe and hides out on Jackson's island, Huck finds the widow's slave, Jim, who is also hiding out. Tom and Jim build a raft, and escape down the river.

During their trip, Huck and Jim meet a few colorful characters, including two feuding families, and two cons who claim to be a king and a duke. Huck may not seem so, but he is very clever, and able to see through the king and dukes' antics, which makes him sick to his stomach. Huck is always trying to do good, and sometimes has a conflict with himself in deciding exactly what is good. One night, he even thinks about turning Jim in, because he feels bad for helping the widow's slave escape. He tells two white men in a canoe to check the raft, claiming his sick uncle to be on it. He ends up convincing them that his uncle has smallpox, so they give him 40 dollars and leave him alone.

I think that this book is great. One of the best I've ever read. This book's plot may be a little over-used, a boy helping a slave escape from his master, but you never really know what's going to happen. Mark Twain is one of the best authors from whom I've ever read. This book easily makes me want to read some other books of his. There are twists, turns, and, like a punch to the face in a dark room, you never see them coming. If your okay with a few politically incorrect words (The book was written in the 1800s, when slavery was legal) and you love adventure, I definitley recommend this book to you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Even though I'm sure a lot of people hear this is a classic and think it's just some old book, I have to say I love The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The characters are incredible. The dialogue is often hilarious and tragic. It's just an all-around incredible novel.
Raccoon More than 1 year ago
The audiobook assisted with the understanding of the dialects of the characters, similar to a play but with the images in your mind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book is awesome but the free version has too many flaws and is not enjoyable to read. Pay the 99 cents and get to reading the actual literature. Google did a poor job on transcription!
apin More than 1 year ago
Why can't the flaw be fixed? Why couldn't this be properly transcribed? How about other public domain books. Almost makes me want to return my Nook Tablet.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Huckleberry Finn is a WONDERFUL book!! It is very FUNNY!!! It sould be rated 5 out of 5 stars!!! I had the adapted version read to me .The comprehensive edition I read to myself.The story is about freedom and friendship. Mark Twain did an outstanding job of talking the way people did back then. Anyone will enjoy it. FIVE STARS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Cougar_H More than 1 year ago
Although Huck Finn is a classic book and loved by many, I found it hard to read. It was written in many different Southern dialects, and it had sentences like, "How you gwyne git'm? You can't slip up on um en grab um; en how's a body gwyne to hit um wid a rock?" Reading conversation after conversation like this gets old fast. Overall, it was a great story, and the major theme of "looking for freedom" was pretty cool. If it was easier to read, I would have LOVED this book, and I would recommend it to anyone who can stomach weird dialects and old fashioned writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As you can see its title, the story is about adventures.But I think it is beyond adventures. After I read the second chapter, I couldn't understand the people who joined 'Tom Sawyer's Gang. The rule of the band doesn't make sense to me.The rule is saying that everyone wants to join the band has to write his name in blood and kill the families of the boys who told the secrets of them. I think Huckleberry Finn and I are really different people in characteristics.I don't like adventures but there would be no Huckleberry Finn without adventures. I don't like the character but it was good experience that made me to think about the people that are totally different from me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Overall, I found this book to be great. Twain's characters were lively and energetic. His use of the southern dialect in Huck's narrative and in the dialog between characters added a certain depth to the novel. It made the characters seem more realistic because the story was set in Missouri along the Mississippi River, and for them to have been speaking proper English would have been hard to swallow. Twain's characters were interestingly crafted as well. Huck and Jim were both amusingly superstitious, the King and the Duke were brilliant and stupid at the same time, and the contrast between the Widow Douglas and her sister on their views on Christianity was very striking indeed. The only negative thing that I found in the book was the use of derogatory names for the slaves. Of course, these names are expected to appear in the novel due to its setting in time. Other than that, the book was great. It was full of adventure, cultural color, and vivid imagery. I'd recommend it to anyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was a very southern style book.I have to say Iactually did like the book pretty good.It was a very adventourous book with Huck and Jim headed north up the Mississippi River. The story gave a pretty great picture of the way the south is and that might be my favorite part about the book. It also reminded me of the kinds of books my elementary school teachers would read to my class.It is aanother good adventure book that needs to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this was an ok book. I wished it had more action in it. Huck Finn to me is a little boy that is interested in what the world has to offer and he finds out when he goes through the adventures he encounters. I would recommed this book because it makes you think alot about salvery and what it must've been like for Jim and put yourself in Jim shoes, its just something to think about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mark Twain has created a world of adventure and curiosity. For Huckleberry Finn his new life of wealth and civilization is more than he can stand. All he can do is wait for an adventure that will free him of his boredom. When his Pap comes back to town, Huck must go and live with him. Pap is an abusive alcoholic. Huckleberry can't wait to get away. After feigning his own death, Huck takes off down the Mississippi in a canoe. He runs across Jim, Miss Watson's runaway slave. Together they sail down the river on a raft, encountering many different people. The scheming Duke and King, the violent Grangerfords who are feuding with the Sheperdsons, and even Tom Sawyer's Aunt Sally gets pulled into Huck's journey. Huck's good luck and sharp wit saves the two friends from peril on more than one occasion. Mark Twain has done a wonderful job of showing life on the Mississippi River. The language used is what one would expect to hear people from 19th century Missouri using. Twain's atmosphere absorbs the reader into Huck's world of mischief and mayhem.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN¿ The book of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn takes place in the Mississippi River. Huck is a boy that likes to be traveling around the world; he doesn¿t like to stay in one single place. He started to get out of the town because he had a father (Pap). He threated him so badly that he was living with two ladies the Widow Douglas and Miss Watson. They tryed to civilized him, but he didn't like that way of living that he ran away from them that was when he started his adventures. We witness the critique, presentation, themes, realistic, entertaining of Huckleberry Finn book. This all started when Huck ran away from his house, and he found a slave named Jim he was Miss Watson¿s slave. He didn¿t like to be a slave, so he ran away too. He was going to look for his family. They got into many adventures together. With these I learned that there are people who don¿t like slavery in the year that this story happened. The true thing about slavery and friendship is that when you don¿t have a true friend, but when we find one, we try to be trustful with it. It showed a good way to know about the adventures of one or more persons. It showed also good numbers of settings. Well all of these things look and tell what we can live today in these days when you run away from home to get some joy in the world with adventures. This book was really good because it had good setting . They show us the importance of friendship. In this movie, we saw child abuse and alcoholics and other things. When the main character showed what was his ideas, it got my whole attention because he was so smart to do all of those things to help Jim, his true friend. This book didn¿t affect my thinkings because it helped me to appreciate all of my friends for what they are and what they have inside, not what they can do for me or what is my convenience with them. It tells me many things about friendship of how important it is for all of us, and when to know if a person is your friend or not.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is absolutely a tremendous classic novel. The book is good and lively, all the way through. Not the least of its qualities is the fidelity with which it paints the characters and the scenes with which the story deals. Twain paints living pictures, and he makes his young rebel hero a character that the reader is bound to like, in spite of himself. The story begins as Huck Finn, a 14 year old houligan, growing up on the banks of the Mississippi River, runs away from his abusive, alcoholic father. The story progresses quite a bit from there. Huck meets up with Jim, a free slave, who also wants to get away from everything. The two venture down the Mississippi and get into all sorts of crazy predicaments. They then meet up with Tom Sawyer. His presence only adds to the duo¿s hi-jinx. The story then takes a surprising turn and ends with a - Bang. So if you can't wait any longer to find out what happens, pick up a copy now!
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the book 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' by Mark Twain, a boy and a runaway slave try to get away from life by evacuating their own town and making their way down along the Mississippi River. Huck Finn who is 14 years old is a boy whose dad is an abusive alcoholic arranges his fake death to get away. Huck is a trouble seeking young boy, but he does mean good. Huck is also the narrator in this novel. He meets up with Jim a little ways down the river. Jim a very soft hearted caring slave. They meet two men who a con artists who pretend to be the King and the Duke. They cause Huck and Jim a ton of trouble. Then they meet up with Tom Sawyer, Tom is adventure seeker and will go out of his way for a little fun. As Huck and Jim make their way down the River Huck accepts Jim as a friend not as a slave. Their struggle is trying to make their way down the Mississippi through all the mishaps that happen along the way. Huck was very confused about whether he should turn Jim in or not. For readers who like suspense and adventure I recommend The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is just an awesome book. When assigned this book to read, one browses through to see how long it is. In this case, it was 42 chapters long. At first I was a little uneasy but once I got into it I couldn't get out. This book was full of adventures and eye opening moments. Reading this book, makes one wish they went out into the Mississippi and lived their life one day at a time. Whatever comes and happens just comes and happens.That's why I like it, it tells one that it is ok to be and feel free every once in awhile. A great piece of work, it has been for years and will continue to be.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's the best book I've ever read, it caught my attention since the first time I read it. I'm a black boy and this story means a lot to me because I could see how my people were treated and I also saw that there were some white people that helped us to become free, i liked this story a lot, it was so good.
Guest More than 1 year ago
in my LA class we read this and i loved it its a must read, for me i never read i hate books but i loved this one!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is without a doubt the better of the two between Tom Sawyer and itself. The ending is great, it has good description, and so on. But it's just on the thin line between Near Classic Novel and Classic Novel. You have to love Mark Twain's anitcs in writing in numerous astrics to show the usage of slang in the book. This shouldn't falter your steady reading pace unless, you are a young adult. The only reason for earning a 4 star and not 5 star is that this book really dosen't CATCH! your attention. I had difficulty becoming engrossed in this book opposed to other classic novels. But don't get me wrong it's a wonderful book. Just don't become aghast when you find yourself uninterested like so many other people that have read the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book used numerous dialects and had plenty of action to keep me entertained throughout the book
Anonymous 4 months ago
Walks in wearing a grey and black suit. She looks around and straightens her cuffs. She has a pixie cut so anyone could mistake her for a guy. Especially with her mask.
Anonymous 4 months ago
I walk in wearing a white rabbit mask and see you." DRAKE?! IS THAT YOU?!" I run up to you and hug you.
Anonymous 4 months ago
*walks in*
Anonymous 4 months ago
She sits alone.