The Adventures of Isabel (Includes Audio CD)
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The Adventures of Isabel (Includes Audio CD)

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by Ogden Nash, Bridget Taylor
     
 

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Meet Isabel, a remarkable girl (based on Ogden Nash's own daughter) who encounters four fearsome foes and doesn't worry, scream or scurry. Courage, spunk and a lot of humor help make Isabel's adventures something you'll share over and over again.

Beautiful watercolor paintings bring The Adventures of Isabel vividly to life, while the audio CD of Ogden Nash reading

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Overview

Meet Isabel, a remarkable girl (based on Ogden Nash's own daughter) who encounters four fearsome foes and doesn't worry, scream or scurry. Courage, spunk and a lot of humor help make Isabel's adventures something you'll share over and over again.

Beautiful watercolor paintings bring The Adventures of Isabel vividly to life, while the audio CD of Ogden Nash reading his classic poem will let everyone follow the amazing exploits of Isabel!

As a bonus on audio CD, Ogden Nash reads The Adventures of Isabel

Ogden Nash was born in New York in 1902 and wrote The Adventures of Isabel in the 1930s. He published hundreds of poems, many of them for his two daughters, Linell and Isabel. They occasionally appeared as characters in his poems, as Isabel does in The Adventures of Isabel. Nash died in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1971.

Bridget Starr Taylor and her husband have two sons, a daughter, and very recently twin grandchildren. She and her family live in New York and spend summers and weekends at her farm in Connecticut. Bridget rides a bike wherever she goes and plays tennis, most often in polka-dotted shorts!

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Adventuresome, fearless, and always clever...Isabel, Isabel is as hilarious as ever. " - The Bloomsbury Review
Publishers Weekly

Nash's (1902-1971) invincible heroine, memorably incarnated in James Marshall's 1991 picture book with the same title, kicks off the publisher's Poetry Telling Stories Collection. Isabel is a good candidate for showing kids the storytelling prowess of a poem: confronted with a child-eating bear, "Isabel, Isabel, didn't worry./ Isabel didn't scream or scurry./ She washed her hands and she straightened her hair up,/ Then Isabel quietly ate the bear up." (She dispenses similar treatment to a wicked witch and a "horrid" one-eyed giant.) Two elements stand out: this edition includes an audio CD of the poem as read by Nash, and it omits the moralizing stanzas that appeared in Marshall's book ("Don't scream when the bugaboo says, 'Boo!'/ Just look it in the eye and say, 'Boo to you!'A ") on the grounds that they were written decades later and are excluded from the official version by Nash's estate. Where Nash reads in an elegant deadpan style, Taylor's watercolors go for outsize gestures and a high-contrast palette. She throws in a visual story line to connect all of the "adventures"; children will enjoy finding the links, even though one simply vanishes at the end. The AMA might appreciate Taylor's sunny conclusion, too: instead of vanquishing a "troublesome" doctor, Isabel befriends him. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)

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Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The heroine of this jaunty poem is no stranger to adversity: she quickly and calmly dispatches a variety of threatening figures, to the strains of Nash's vivacious comic cadences. (``She washed her hands and she straightened her hair up. / Then Isabel quietly ate the bear up.'') As depicted by the ever-wacky Marshall, Isabel is rotund, bespectacled and absolutely unflappable, with a quiet grin of self-satisfaction. Her colorful wardrobe includes such incongruities as roller skates (lifted from an easily done-in witch) and Birkenstock sandals. The villains here are a hilariously horrible lot, from a toothy, neon-green witch to a hairy, one-eyed giant to a doctor whose every pore radiates untrustworthiness. Beneath its droll humor, this fine lark of a book contains a sound bit of advice for banishing terrors real and imagined: ``Don't scream when the bugaboo says `Boo!' / Just look it in the eye and say, `Boo to you!' '' Ages 4-8. (Sept.)
The Bloomsbury Review

Adventuresome, fearless, and always clever...Isabel, Isabel is as hilarious as ever.

School Library Journal

Gr 2-5- In this newly illustrated edition of the well-known poem, a young girl courageously faces a series of dangers. When threatened by a bear, "Isabel, Isabel didn't worry,/Isabel didn't scream or scurry"-instead, she eats the bear. She also consumes a witch, decapitates a giant, and defeats an evil doctor. This book lacks two stanzas that appear in the version illustrated by James Marshall (Little, Brown, 1991; o.p.), which suggest that the foes that Isabel faces are all in her dreams. There is no such consolation here. Isabel is so unflappable that readers are not sure which is more menacing, the girl or the monsters. Taylor's bright watercolor illustrations are well suited to the text. The protagonist, dressed in polka-dot shorts, sometimes looks innocent, but at other times impish. Each encounter with a formidable creature takes place in a different setting, and Isabel pilots herself around in a small airplane or a power boat, always accompanied by her dog. The illustrations are full of color and action. It's interesting to hear Nash's voice on the accompanying CD, but his reading lacks drama. The poem is likely to delight children who are comfortable with books that have a certain level of gruesome humor, such as Keith Graves's Frank Was a Monster Who Wanted to Dance (Chronicle, 1999).-Donna Cardon, Provo City Library, UT

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402210273
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
04/01/2008
Series:
Poetry Telling Stories Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Adventures of Isabel

Isabel met an enormous bear,
Isabel, Isabel, didn't care;
The bear was hungry, the bear was ravenous,
The bear's big mouth was cruel and cavernous.

The bear said, Isabel, glad to meet you,
How do, Isabel, now I'll eat you!
Isabel, Isabel, didn't worry,
Isabel didn't scream or scurry.
She washed her hands and she straightened her hair up,
Then Isabel quietly ate the bear up.

Once in a night as black as pitch
Isabel met a wicked old witch.
The witch's face was cross and wrinkled,
The witch's gums with teeth were sprinkled.

Meet the Author

Ogden Nash was born in New York in 1902. He published his first children's book, "The Cricket of Caradon" in 1925. He would publish 19 books of poetry, as well as being on the staff of New Yorker magazine. Nash died in Baltimore, Maryland in 1971.

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The Adventures of Isabel (Includes Audio CD) 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
The_Bedtime_Book_Review More than 1 year ago
The Adventures of Isabel is a whimsical story about a young girl that is fearless. When met with adversity, she devours it- quite literally! The story is simple and on the comprehension level of a mature toddler, but it is also peppered with larger words like "ravenous" and "cavernous" that not only add to the magical cadence when read aloud but also offer learning opportunities for older children. The illustrations are beautifully detailed and fascinating to look at. Every picture is filled with brilliant colors and texture. By including details not given in the story (like Isabel's canine companion, the jar of cookies she takes from the bear's house that remains with her in every scene thereafter, and the subtle background hints at the bear's aeronautical ties) artist Bridget Starr Taylor not only bolsters the storyline with her illustrations but also adds to the fun quirkiness that springs from every page in this book. First published in the 1930's, this poem is a classic example of Ogden Nash's magical verse that has been capturing the imagination of children and parents for generations. Though an additional stanza was written in the 60's, this edition was illustrated and published in 2008 with the poem preserved just as Nash had originally written it for his daughter Isabel almost eighty years ago. For an additional delight, listen to the story read by the author himself on the CD that comes with the book. I thoroughly enjoyed this book as did my three year old daughter. However, if your little one is squeamish when it comes to child-gobbling witches, bears and giants you may want to save The Adventures of Isabel for when they're a bit older. On the other hand, if danger and adventure keep your tot turning the pages, this book will never collect dust. For more reviews and recommended reading lists visit www.BedtimeBookReview.blogspot.com
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Isabel met a fellow called Nile. Isabel didn't like his talkative style. But Nile was rabbitty, Nile was chatty. Nile was know to be completely batty. Good Morning Isabel chatty Nile said. I'm going to talk till I explode your head Isabel, Isabel didn't worry. Isabel didn't scream or scurry. She brushed her teeth, looked North and South. Got a brick and blocked his mouth.