The Aeneid

The Aeneid

4.2 197
by Virgil
     
 

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Follow Aeneid as he flees a burning Troy with his family and sets out on a dangerous journey to found what will one day become The Roman Empire. Thrill with him as he gets caught up in conflicts between the gods, all the while striving to complete his own grand destiny. Virgil intended this book to be a sequel to the Iliad and the Odyssey, and as such it takes up with…  See more details below

Overview

Follow Aeneid as he flees a burning Troy with his family and sets out on a dangerous journey to found what will one day become The Roman Empire. Thrill with him as he gets caught up in conflicts between the gods, all the while striving to complete his own grand destiny. Virgil intended this book to be a sequel to the Iliad and the Odyssey, and as such it takes up with events just after the finish of the Odyssey.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011853159
Publisher:
Carry Light Books
Publication date:
10/07/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
799,155
File size:
299 KB

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The Aeneid 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 197 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am rereading this edition after a lapse of 20 years since my first reading as a student of literature in college. I picked it up again out of curiosity, and found myself enthralled after a couple of pages. I didn't think I would want to keep this book, but it deserves a permanent place in my library. If you have any curiosity at all about The Aeneid, try this translation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I didn't quite understand this when I read it at 10 years old, but then I read it again at 14, and since then I've asked all of my friends to read it. Now I'm reading this great adventure to my kids, and they love every sentence. Read this, and the Odyssey.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This Dover Edition of -The Aeneid- by Publius Vergilius Maro (Virgil or Vergil) is a 1995 reprint of the English verse trans lation by Charles J. Billson, published in London in 1906. To try to render, or match, Virgil's Latin verse, into an English verse 'equivalent' is a tough job indeed. Though, there ARE several English verse translations available in paperback format. As one reviewer already noted, there are no notes or annotations for this 'thrift edition.' This poses problems for those who lack knowledge of Roman history, knowledge of Virgil and his times, and Roman/Greek mythology. On the other hand, it can be a refreshing 'break' for those who want to simply enjoy the work itself (though not in its original language and verse format) in a readable, if somewhat stilted English verse form. The original Latin (from the Loeb Classical Library, Vol. 63) begins: 'Arma virumque cano, Troiae qui primus ab oris/ Italiam fato profugus Lavinaque venit/ litora--' [the prose translation by H.R. Fairclough (Revised by G.P. Goold) renders this as: 'Arms and the man I sing, who first from the coasts of Troy, exiled by fate, came to Italy and Lavine shores--'.] This English verse translation by Billson presents this same opening as: 'Arms and the Man I sing, who first from Troy,/A Doom-led exile, on Lavinian shores/ Reached Italy; long tossed on sea and land/ By Heaven's rude arm--'. This particular verse rendering, I believe, rates 4 stars, while the epic itself rates 5 stars as one of the world's great works of creative art and literature. The poem also became the ancient Roman empire's national epic (celebrating Rome's legendary ancient ancestors and her 'destined' purpose) from the time of the 1st Emperor Augustus onward.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dover Thrift has long been a great resource for those of us who want to read the classics without breaking our budgets. For students like myself, it could even be referred to as a 'godsend.' Dover Thrift's version of Aeneid is a great copy to introduce one's self to the text with. It's poetic, but reasonably easy to follow. The downside is that there is no introductory commentary or footnote material, but it's still a great place to start your journey with Aeneas. The Aeneid itself is a seminal text. One way to think of it is as the text that linked together Homer and Dante: it utilizes epic conventions, but it also has an original narrative voice that would inspire Dante to follow Virgil--the character--through a fantastic, fictional hell, but also to follow Vergil--the writer's--literary example. A must-read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pretty good translation, not as good as some I've read. Wish it had reference numbers.
Log-IC More than 1 year ago
A translation on par with the best of Fagles and Kaufmann's works.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A classic in the utmost form of the Greek warriors who began Rome and the Roman Empire.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fitzgerald's translation captures what Virgil's vision must have been. Aeneas possesses all the qualities of a true hero. I wept when I read the king's prayer as his son left for battle with Aeneas. The love felt for this son was one of the most beautiful passages I've ever read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Aeneid by Virgil was excellently translated by Fitzgerald in this classic epic/adventure. I am a Latin student, and I have read the Latin version and Fitzgerald did an excellent job with this. If you like Latin/Roman culture, this is a MUST read. Its a classic, and one of the best books ever written. I don't think there has ever been another legendary epic as good as this!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fitzgerald's translation of The Aeneid is considered by experts to be the best English version of Virgil's timeless epic. This is a must read for ambitious students and literature buffs. Were it not for good, dependable translations of classical works, the modern reader who knows no Latin could not explore the ideas of antiquity through the writings of its participants.
Anonymous 11 days ago
Ran back into camp. He was carrying a rabbit, putting it in the freshkill pile
Anonymous 11 days ago
Is not in camp i'm bored
Anonymous 11 days ago
The cat in Starclan watched the clan carefully, before turning back into Starclan hunting grounds. (I wrote a warriors fanfic on paper, does anyone want me to type it?)
Anonymous 12 days ago
Pads in frightend a few burns on her paws she looks around for nightflower
Anonymous 12 days ago
Usually, she knew what to do, but now she felt a little unsure that she should be leader. If only Spiritstar was still around, she thought, looking around. She would know what to do. Think like Spiritstar. <p> "Okay. What caused the fire?" She thought aloud. "I better go scout to see what's going on, or send somebody." She begins to speak louder, addressing the Clan. "I will go see the fire, where it is, and if it is safe. While I am gone, since Aspen isn't on, I leave Iceheart in charge." With that, she dashes out, wondering if she was being a good leader.
Anonymous 12 days ago
"What happened? I smelled smoke by the camp and went to warn you, but nobody was there."
Anonymous 12 days ago
Curls up into a little ball and whimpers
Anonymous 13 days ago
Padded in with Doekit and put her down.
Anonymous 13 days ago
[Here?]
Anonymous 6 months ago
"Who are you?"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My issues were with the technical part of the book, mainly why I had to turn 8 pages in order for the page counter to change. For some reason, it made this very laborious to read. That said, if you're looking for an old epic different from the other old epics, this will be a good read for you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I want to take over all the camps and make one huge camp
Marktavius More than 1 year ago
I was really impressed with the fact that this was a translation of a Latin work, but the translators managed to maintain a rhyming structure. Not being fluent in ancient Latin, I can't speak to how well it captures the spirit and narrative of Virgil's original, but I found it to be an engrossing story, full of interesting events and characters. The accounts of the battles are engrossing and the machinations of the gods are told with fascinating verbal imagery.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Steped next to the barerier