The Aeneid [NOOK Book]

Overview

Arms, and the man I sing, who, forc'd by fate,
And haughty Juno's unrelenting hate,
Expell'd and ...
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The Aeneid

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Overview

Arms, and the man I sing, who, forc'd by fate,
And haughty Juno's unrelenting hate,
Expell'd and exil'd, left the Trojan shore.
Long labors, both by sea and land, he bore,
And in the doubtful war, before he won
The Latian realm, and built the destin'd town;
His banish'd gods restor'd to rites divine,
And settled sure succession in his line,
From whence the race of Alban fathers come,
And the long glories of majestic Rome.
O Muse! the causes and the crimes relate;
What goddess was provok'd, and whence her hate;
For what offense the Queen of Heav'n began
To persecute so brave, so just a man;
Involv'd his anxious life in endless cares,
Expos'd to wants, and hurried into wars!
Can heav'nly minds such high resentment show,
Or exercise their spite in human woe?
Against the Tiber's mouth, but far away,
An ancient town was seated on the sea;
A Tyrian colony; the people made
Stout for the war, and studious of their trade:
Carthage the name; belov'd by Juno more
Than her own Argos, or the Samian shore.
Here stood her chariot; here, if Heav'n were kind,
The seat of awful empire she design'd.
Yet she had heard an ancient rumor fly,
(Long cited by the people of the sky,)
That times to come should see the Trojan race
Her Carthage ruin, and her tow'rs deface;
Nor thus confin'd, the yoke of sov'reign sway
Should on the necks of all the nations lay.
She ponder'd this, and fear'd it was in fate;
Nor could forget the war she wag'd of late
For conqu'ring Greece against the Trojan state.
Besides, long causes working in her mind,
And secret seeds of envy, lay behind;
Deep graven in her heart the doom remain'd
Of partial Paris, and her form disdain'd;
The grace bestow'd on ravish'd Ganymed,
Electra's glories, and her injur'd bed.
Each was a cause alone; and all combin'd
To kindle vengeance in her haughty mind.
For this, far distant from the Latian coast
She drove the remnants of the Trojan host;
And sev'n long years th' unhappy wand'ring train
Were toss'd by storms, and scatter'd thro' the main.
Such time, such toil, requir'd the Roman name,
Such length of labor for so vast a frame.
Now scarce the Trojan fleet, with sails and oars,
Had left behind the fair Sicilian shores,
Ent'ring with cheerful shouts the wat'ry reign,
And plowing frothy furrows in the main;
When, lab'ring still with endless discontent,
The Queen of Heav'n did thus her fury vent:
"Then am I vanquish'd? must I yield?" said she,
"And must the Trojans reign in Italy?
So Fate will have it, and Jove adds his force;
Nor can my pow'r divert their happy course.
Could angry Pallas, with revengeful spleen,
The Grecian navy burn, and drown the men?
She, for the fault of one offending foe,
The bolts of Jove himself presum'd to throw:
With whirlwinds from beneath she toss'd the ship,
And bare expos'd the bosom of the deep;
Then, as an eagle gripes the trembling game,
The wretch, yet hissing with her father's flame,
She strongly seiz'd, and with a burning wound
Transfix'd, and naked, on a rock she bound.
But I, who walk in awful state above,
The majesty of heav'n, the sister wife of Jove,
For length of years my fruitless force employ
Against the thin remains of ruin'd Troy!
What nations now to Juno's pow'r will pray,
Or off'rings on my slighted altars lay?"
Thus rag'd the goddess; and, with fury fraught.
The restless regions of the storms she sought,
Where, in a spacious cave of living stone,
The tyrant Aeolus, from his airy throne,
With pow'r imperial curbs the struggling winds,
And sounding tempests in dark prisons binds.
This way and that th' impatient captives tend,
And, pressing for release, the mountains rend.
High in his hall th' undaunted monarch stands,
And shakes his scepter, and their rage commands;
Which did he not, their unresisted sway
Would sweep the world before them in their way;
Earth, air, and seas thro' empty space would roll,
And heav'n would fly before the driving soul.
In fear of this, the Father of the Gods
Confin'd their fury to those dark abodes,
And lock'd 'em safe within, oppress'd with mountain loads;
Impos'd a king, with arbitrary sway,
To loose their fetters, or their force allay.
To whom the suppliant queen her pray'rs address'd,
And thus the tenor of her suit express'd:
"O Aeolus! for to thee the King of Heav'n
The pow'r of tempests and of winds has giv'n;
Thy force alone their fury can restrain,
And smooth the waves, or swell the troubled main-
A race of wand'ring slaves, abhorr'd by me,
With prosp'rous passage cut the Tuscan sea;
To fruitful Italy their course they steer,
And for their vanquish'd gods design new temples there.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940149593163
  • Publisher: Lost Leaf Publications
  • Publication date: 3/6/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 418 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 714 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(468)

4 Star

(92)

3 Star

(51)

2 Star

(52)

1 Star

(51)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 714 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2006

    Don't be intimidated...

    I am rereading this edition after a lapse of 20 years since my first reading as a student of literature in college. I picked it up again out of curiosity, and found myself enthralled after a couple of pages. I didn't think I would want to keep this book, but it deserves a permanent place in my library. If you have any curiosity at all about The Aeneid, try this translation.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2004

    'I ask no crown/ Unpledged by Fate...'

    This Dover Edition of -The Aeneid- by Publius Vergilius Maro (Virgil or Vergil) is a 1995 reprint of the English verse trans lation by Charles J. Billson, published in London in 1906. To try to render, or match, Virgil's Latin verse, into an English verse 'equivalent' is a tough job indeed. Though, there ARE several English verse translations available in paperback format. As one reviewer already noted, there are no notes or annotations for this 'thrift edition.' This poses problems for those who lack knowledge of Roman history, knowledge of Virgil and his times, and Roman/Greek mythology. On the other hand, it can be a refreshing 'break' for those who want to simply enjoy the work itself (though not in its original language and verse format) in a readable, if somewhat stilted English verse form. The original Latin (from the Loeb Classical Library, Vol. 63) begins: 'Arma virumque cano, Troiae qui primus ab oris/ Italiam fato profugus Lavinaque venit/ litora--' [the prose translation by H.R. Fairclough (Revised by G.P. Goold) renders this as: 'Arms and the man I sing, who first from the coasts of Troy, exiled by fate, came to Italy and Lavine shores--'.] This English verse translation by Billson presents this same opening as: 'Arms and the Man I sing, who first from Troy,/A Doom-led exile, on Lavinian shores/ Reached Italy; long tossed on sea and land/ By Heaven's rude arm--'. This particular verse rendering, I believe, rates 4 stars, while the epic itself rates 5 stars as one of the world's great works of creative art and literature. The poem also became the ancient Roman empire's national epic (celebrating Rome's legendary ancient ancestors and her 'destined' purpose) from the time of the 1st Emperor Augustus onward.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2008

    A classic for children and all

    I didn't quite understand this when I read it at 10 years old, but then I read it again at 14, and since then I've asked all of my friends to read it. Now I'm reading this great adventure to my kids, and they love every sentence. Read this, and the Odyssey.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2004

    Cheap, but Fantastic

    Dover Thrift has long been a great resource for those of us who want to read the classics without breaking our budgets. For students like myself, it could even be referred to as a 'godsend.' Dover Thrift's version of Aeneid is a great copy to introduce one's self to the text with. It's poetic, but reasonably easy to follow. The downside is that there is no introductory commentary or footnote material, but it's still a great place to start your journey with Aeneas. The Aeneid itself is a seminal text. One way to think of it is as the text that linked together Homer and Dante: it utilizes epic conventions, but it also has an original narrative voice that would inspire Dante to follow Virgil--the character--through a fantastic, fictional hell, but also to follow Vergil--the writer's--literary example. A must-read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2003

    Wonderful Epic

    Fitzgerald's translation captures what Virgil's vision must have been. Aeneas possesses all the qualities of a true hero. I wept when I read the king's prayer as his son left for battle with Aeneas. The love felt for this son was one of the most beautiful passages I've ever read.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 23, 2014

    Prism~Song

    Last Resort by Papa Roach

    Cut my life in

    Prism~Song<p>

    Last Resort by Papa Roach</p>
    <p>

    Cut my life into pieces<br />
    This is my last resort<br />
    Suffocation, no, no breathing<br />
    Don't give a f.uck<br />
    If I cut my arm bleeding<br />
    This is my last resort</p>
    <p>

    Cut my life into pieces<br />
    I've reached my last resort<br />
    Suffocation, no breathing<br />
    Don't give a f.uck<br />
    If I cut my arm bleeding<br />
    Do you even care if I die bleeding?</p>
    <p>

    Would it be wrong or<br />
    Would it be right<br />
    If I took my life tonight<br />
    Chances are that I might<br />
    Mutilation out of sight<br />
    And I'm contemplating suicide</p>
    <p>

    'Cause I'm losing my sight, losing my mind<br />
    Wish somebody would tell me I'm fine<br />
    Losing my sight, losing my mind<br />
    Wish somebody would tell me I'm fine</p>
    <p>

    I never realized, I was spread too thin<br />
    Till it was too late and I was empty within<br />
    Hungry feeding on chaos and living in sin<br />
    Downward spiral, where do I begin</p>
    <p>

    It all started when I lost my mother<br />
    No love for myself and no love for another<br />
    Searching to find a love upon a higher level<br />
    Finding nothing but questions and devils</p>
    <p>

    'Cause I'm losing my sight, losing my mind<br />
    Wish somebody would tell me I'm fine<br />
    Losing my sight, losing my mind<br />
    Wish somebody would tell me I'm fine</p>
    <p>

    Nothing's alright, nothing is fine<br />
    I'm running and I'm crying<br />
    I'm crying, I'm crying, I'm crying I'm crying<br />
    I can't go on living this way</p>
    <p>

    Cut my life into pieces<br />
    This is my last resort<br />
    Suffocation, no breathing<br />
    Don't give a f.uck<br />
    If I cut my arm bleeding<br />

    Would it be wrong<br />
    Would it be right?<br />
    If I took my life tonight<br />
    Chances are that I might<br />
    Mutilation out of sight<br />
    And I'm contemplating suicide</p>
    <p>

    'Cause I'm losing my sight, losing my mind<br />
    Wish somebody would tell me I'm fine<br />
    Losing my sight, losing my mind<br />
    Wish somebody would tell me I'm fine</p>
    <p>

    Nothing's alright, nothing is fine<br />
    I'm running and I'm crying<br />
    I can't go on living this way<br />
    Can't go on, living this way<br />
    Nothing's all right</p>
    <p>Here y'alls go. One of my favouritest songs ever. I'll probably be posting several more over the next several minutes.</p>

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2012

    Fagles is the best translation

    All the others tend to warp the language to fit English rhymes, or to show how clever they are. Fagles keeps a nice epic rhythm but in plain English word order (no talking like Yoda just to make it rhyme, like Dryden). You get the story and the feel of it, but in modern English.

    FAGLES or none, I say.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 11, 2009

    Grand Slam

    A translation on par with the best of Fagles and Kaufmann's works.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2007

    The beginning of Rome

    A classic in the utmost form of the Greek warriors who began Rome and the Roman Empire.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2002

    A Must Read

    The Aeneid by Virgil was excellently translated by Fitzgerald in this classic epic/adventure. I am a Latin student, and I have read the Latin version and Fitzgerald did an excellent job with this. If you like Latin/Roman culture, this is a MUST read. Its a classic, and one of the best books ever written. I don't think there has ever been another legendary epic as good as this!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 1999

    For those who don't read Latin...

    Fitzgerald's translation of The Aeneid is considered by experts to be the best English version of Virgil's timeless epic. This is a must read for ambitious students and literature buffs. Were it not for good, dependable translations of classical works, the modern reader who knows no Latin could not explore the ideas of antiquity through the writings of its participants.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2015

    Xtoski

    The arrow barely penetrated a single scale due to his sheer size, and thus wasn't noticef.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2015

    To xstosi

    If you want to live get more followers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2015

    Shadow angel

    Attacks xtoski.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2015

    Xtoski

    (You are a nub.)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2015

    To Xtoski

    Hi bunny bunny bunny c.r.a.p!!!!!!!!! ~Artep

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2015

    Shadow ang

    Black arrows hurt dragons duh. Read the hobbit. Also i am an angel. The only way you can control me is by mind control. Oops.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2015

    Eragon 2 to all

    Dont worry. I dulled the knife. So it wint even hurt zach

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2015

    Zoey

    Takes a knife and stabs herself

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2015

    Dawn

    Nodded in agreement and flew off with Vivvian.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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