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The Aeneid (Fitzgerald translation) (Everyman's Library)
     

The Aeneid (Fitzgerald translation) (Everyman's Library)

4.2 206
by Virgil, Robert Fitzgerald (Translator), Philip Hardie (Introduction)
 

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In dramatic and narrative power, Virgil’s Aeneid is the equal of its great Homeric predecessors, The Iliad and The Odyssey. It surpasses them, however, in the intense sympathy it displays for its human actors–a sympathy that makes events such as Aeneas’s escape from Troy and search for a new homeland, the passion and the death

Overview

In dramatic and narrative power, Virgil’s Aeneid is the equal of its great Homeric predecessors, The Iliad and The Odyssey. It surpasses them, however, in the intense sympathy it displays for its human actors–a sympathy that makes events such as Aeneas’s escape from Troy and search for a new homeland, the passion and the death of Dido, the defeat of Turnus, and the founding of Rome among the most memorable in literature.

This celebrated translation by Robert Fitzgerald does full justice to the speed, clarity, and stately grandeur of the Roman Empire’s most magnificent literary work of art.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Fitzgerald’s is so decisively the best modern Aeneid that it is unthinkable anyone will want to use any other version for a long time to come.” –New York Review of Books

“A rendering that is both marvelously readable and scrupulously faithful . . . Fitzgerald has managed, by a sensitive use of faintly archaic vocabulary and a keen ear for sound and rhythm, to suggest the solemnity and the movement of Virgil’s poetry as no previous translator has done . . . This is a sustained achievement of beauty and power.” –Boston Globe

“In this Aeneid Fitzgerald is at the top of his form . . . [One would] be a very insensitive reader if, once launched on Aeneas’ fateful journey with Fitzgerald as guide, [one] does not follow it to the end.” –The New Republic

“This is translation as interpretation, Virgil filtered through one of the finest poetic sensibilities of our time . . . Fitzgerald hides his consummate artistry, effaces his own prodigious labor, until the text speaks to us directly, without foreignness of time or place.” –The Boston Review

With an Introduction by Philip Hardie

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679413356
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/28/1992
Series:
Everyman's Library
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
520
Sales rank:
273,246
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

Virgil (70 B.C-19 B.C) is regarded as the greatest Roman poet, known for his epic, The Aeneid (written about 29 B.C. unfinished). Virgil was born on October 15, 70 B.C., in a small village near Mantua in Northern Italy. He attended school at Cremona and Milan, and then went to Rome, where he studied mathematics, medicine and rhetoric, and completed his studies in Naples. Between 42 and 37 B.C. Virgil composed pastoral poems known as Ecologues, and spent years on the Georgics.At the urging of Augustus Caesar, Virgil began to write The Aeneid, a poem of the glory of Rome under Caesars rule. Virgil devoted the remaining time of his life, from 30 to 19 B.C., to the composition of The Aeneid, the national epic of Rome and to glory of the Empire. The poet died in 19 B.C of a fever he contracted on his visit to Greece with the Emperor. It is said that the poet had instructed his executor Varius to destroy The Aeneid, but Augustus ordered Varius to ignore this request, and the poem was published.

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The Aeneid 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 206 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am rereading this edition after a lapse of 20 years since my first reading as a student of literature in college. I picked it up again out of curiosity, and found myself enthralled after a couple of pages. I didn't think I would want to keep this book, but it deserves a permanent place in my library. If you have any curiosity at all about The Aeneid, try this translation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I didn't quite understand this when I read it at 10 years old, but then I read it again at 14, and since then I've asked all of my friends to read it. Now I'm reading this great adventure to my kids, and they love every sentence. Read this, and the Odyssey.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pretty good translation, not as good as some I've read. Wish it had reference numbers.
Log-IC More than 1 year ago
A translation on par with the best of Fagles and Kaufmann's works.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A classic in the utmost form of the Greek warriors who began Rome and the Roman Empire.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fitzgerald's translation captures what Virgil's vision must have been. Aeneas possesses all the qualities of a true hero. I wept when I read the king's prayer as his son left for battle with Aeneas. The love felt for this son was one of the most beautiful passages I've ever read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Aeneid by Virgil was excellently translated by Fitzgerald in this classic epic/adventure. I am a Latin student, and I have read the Latin version and Fitzgerald did an excellent job with this. If you like Latin/Roman culture, this is a MUST read. Its a classic, and one of the best books ever written. I don't think there has ever been another legendary epic as good as this!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fitzgerald's translation of The Aeneid is considered by experts to be the best English version of Virgil's timeless epic. This is a must read for ambitious students and literature buffs. Were it not for good, dependable translations of classical works, the modern reader who knows no Latin could not explore the ideas of antiquity through the writings of its participants.
Anonymous 7 months ago
She padded in sniffing the air
Anonymous 7 months ago
Umm.... hey.....? Im kinda new here..... mind showing me around?
Anonymous 7 months ago
The names are really hard to come up with. Like he one i have now so jold on a day or two for those
Anonymous 7 months ago
It let out a hoarse, forced mew before collasping from exhaustion. It's bloodied paws seemed oversized for it's body, it's grey fur matted and dirtied.
Anonymous 7 months ago
I will talk to ya and for when you rank up i got some good names for you to use or try. No one talks to me either. I have been in this clan for like two or three years.
Anonymous 7 months ago
Yawned
Anonymous 8 months ago
Are you bad?
Anonymous 8 months ago
"May i join?", she asked
Anonymous 8 months ago
A brown cat with green eyes and falcon wings padded in. He had a scar around his neck, and was wearing a pendant with a lightning bolt on it. He had a star on his cheek, representing the life that Seastar gave him, which had ressurected him from death. A tear slipped down his cheek. He recognized no one. "You!" He mews to the nearest cat. "Please tell me where Aslanstar is! Is she alive? I need to find my mother right away!"
Anonymous 8 months ago
What happened? Sorry for being inactive.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Sunstreak and Brownface sat huddled together, their heads down. Sunstreak seemed unharmed other than some singed fur, and a rattling cough shook him once in a while. Brownface's ear had an ugly red welt. Sparrowwing was nowhere to be found.
Anonymous 8 months ago
*bounds into the group looking around frantically*"has anyone seen yui? I cant find her!"
Anonymous 8 months ago
He limps in coughing and vomiting he collapses.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Padded into the shelter as she ran into bundle of wouned cat "May i help you?" She asks looking at the desprete cats
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Drakon padded in. "What first?" She asked.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He padded in. It was a large, abandoned camp. From BloodClan years ago. A temporary resting place for RockClan. He remembered stumbling upon it when he first joined CC as a kit all those many, many moons ago. He sat in the middle and faced his patrol now, his eyes sparkling.