The Age of Miracles

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Overview

“It still amazes me how little we really knew. . . . Maybe everything that happened to me and my family had nothing at all to do with the slowing. It’s possible, I guess. But I doubt it. I doubt it very much.”

Luminous, haunting, unforgettable, The Age of Miracles is a stunning fiction debut by a superb new writer, a story about coming of age during extraordinary times, about people going on with their lives in an era of profound uncertainty.

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Overview

“It still amazes me how little we really knew. . . . Maybe everything that happened to me and my family had nothing at all to do with the slowing. It’s possible, I guess. But I doubt it. I doubt it very much.”

Luminous, haunting, unforgettable, The Age of Miracles is a stunning fiction debut by a superb new writer, a story about coming of age during extraordinary times, about people going on with their lives in an era of profound uncertainty.

On a seemingly ordinary Saturday in a California suburb, Julia and her family awake to discover, along with the rest of the world, that the rotation of the earth has suddenly begun to slow. The days and nights grow longer and longer, gravity is affected, the environment is thrown into disarray. Yet as she struggles to navigate an ever-shifting landscape, Julia is also coping with the normal disasters of everyday life—the fissures in her parents’ marriage, the loss of old friends, the hopeful anguish of first love, the bizarre behavior of her grandfather who, convinced of a government conspiracy, spends his days obsessively cataloging his possessions. As Julia adjusts to the new normal, the slowing inexorably continues.

With spare, graceful prose and the emotional wisdom of a born storyteller, Karen Thompson Walker has created a singular narrator in Julia, a resilient and insightful young girl, and a moving portrait of family life set against the backdrop of an utterly altered world.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this gripping debut, 11-year-old Julia wakes one day to the news that the earth’s rotation has started slowing. The immediate effects—no one at soccer practice; relentless broadcasts of the same bewildered scientists—soon feel banal compared to what unfolds. “The slowing” is growing slower still, and soon both day and night are more than twice as long as they once were. When governments decide to stick to the 24-hour schedule (ignoring circadian rhythms), a subversive movement erupts, “real-timers” who disregard the clock and appear to be weathering the slowing better than clock-timers—at first. Thompson’s Julia is the perfect narrator. On the brink of adolescence, she’s as concerned with buying her first bra as with the birds falling out of the sky. She wants to be popular as badly as she wants her world to remain familiar. While the apocalypse looms large—has in fact already arrived—the narrative remains fiercely grounded in the surreal and horrifying day-to-day and the personal decisions that persist even though no one knows what to do. A triumph of vision, language, and terrifying momentum, the story also feels eerily plausible, as if the problems we’ve been worrying about all along pale in comparison to what might actually bring our end. Agent: Eric Simonoff, WME Entertainment. (June)
Library Journal
Scary premise: the slowing of the earth's rotation causes large-scale devastation—and small but important troubles for a girl named Julia. This carefully researched debut novel by a former Simon & Schuster editor provoked an immediate frenzy, selling to 25 countries and earning a Wall Street Journal story highlighted its YA crossover appeal. With a 100,000-copy first printing and a seven-city tour; don't get caught without it.
Library Journal
This melancholy debut novel examines the impact of a global natural disaster on ordinary people. When the earth's rotation slows to a crawl, resulting in longer days, civilization begins to unravel. Eleven-year-old Julia documents society's steady decline while coping with the challenges of everyday life, such as friendship and first love. VERDICT Beautifully written and with great appeal for both teens and adults, this combination of an end-of-the-world story line with coming-of-age fiction equals a tour de force.
Kirkus Reviews
In Walker's stunning debut, a young California girl coming of age in a dystopian near future confronts the inevitability of change on the most personal level as life on earth withers. Sixth-grader Julia, whose mother is a slightly neurotic former actress and whose father is an obstetrician, is living an unremarkable American middle-class childhood. She rides the school bus and takes piano lessons; she has a mild crush on a boy named Seth whose mother has cancer; she enjoys sleepovers with her best friend Hanna, who happens to be a Mormon. Then one October morning there's a news report that scientists have discovered a slowing of the earth's rotation, adding minutes to each day and night. After initial panic, the human tendency to adapt sets in even as the extra minutes increase into hours. Most citizens go along when the government stays on a 24-hour clock, although an underground movement of those living by "real time" sprouts up. Gravity is affected; birds begin to die, and astronauts are stranded on their space station. By November, the "real time" of days has grown to 40 hours, and the actual periods of light and dark only get longer from that point. The world faces crises in communication, health, transportation and food supply. The changes in the planet are profound, but the daily changes in Julia's life, which she might be facing even in a normal day, are equally profound. Hanna's family moves to Utah, leaving Julia without a best friend to help defend against the bullies at the bus stop. She goes through the trials and joys of first love. She begins to see cracks in her parents' marriage and must navigate the currents of loyalty and moral uncertainty. She faces sickness and death of loved ones. But she also witnesses constancy and perseverance. Julia's life is shaped by what happens in the larger world, but it is the only life she knows, and Walker captures each moment, intimate and universal, with magical precision. Riveting, heartbreaking, profoundly moving.
The New York Times Book Review
Well written and engrossing, this is a tale in which the strangest thing isn't so much the 72-hour days as the odd mix of the commonplace and the catastrophic.
—Alison McCulloch
From the Publisher
Praise for The Age of Miracles
 
“[A] moving tale that mixes the real and surreal, the ordinary and the extraordinary with impressive fluency and flair … Ms. Walker has an instinctive feel for narrative architecture, creating a story, in lapidary prose, that moves ahead with a sense of both the inevitable and the unexpected … Ms. Walker maps [her characters’] inner lives with such sure-footedness that they become as recognizable to us as people we’ve grown up with or watched for years on television… [A] precocious debut…one of this summer’s hot literary reads.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“THE NEXT BIG FEMALE NOVELIST.” —Rolling Stone

THE SUMMER BOOK.” —Vanity Fair.com

“[AN] EARTHSHAKING DEBUT.” –Entertainment Weekly
 
“Part speculative fiction, part coming-of-age story…The Age of Miracles could turn Walker into American literature's next big thing.”—NPR
 
 “A tender coming-of-age novel.”—Maureen Dowd, The New York Times
 
“Walker creates lovely, low-key scenes to dramatize her premise…The spirit of Ray Bradbury hovers in the mixture of the portentous and quotidian.”The New Yorker

“[Walker] matches the fierce creativity of her imagination with a lyrical and portentous understanding of the present.”People (4 stars)

“This haunting and soul-stirring novel about the apocalypse is transformative and unforgettable.”Marie Claire

“Quietly explosive … Walker describes global shifts with a sense of utter realism, but she treats Julia’s personal adolescent upheaval with equal care, delicacy, and poignancy.”—O, The Oprah Magazine

“Haunting.”—Real Simple

“If you begin this book, you'll be loath to set it down until you've reached its end… The Age of Miracles reminds us that we never know when everything will change, when a single event will split our understanding of personal history and all history into a Before and an After.” –The San Francisco Chronicle

“The perfect combination of the intimate and the pandemic…Flawlessly written; it could be the most assured debut by an American writer since Jennifer Egan's ‘Emerald City.’”—Denver Post
 
“Touching, observant and poetic.”—The Columbus Dispatch
 
“Simply told, skillfully crafted and filled with metaphorical unities, this resonant first novel [rings] with difficult truths both large and small.”—Kansas City Star

"The Age of Miracles lingers, like a faded photo of a happy time. It is stunning.”–Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Both utterly realistic and fantastically dystopian…The big miracles, Walker seems to be saying, may doom the world at large, but the little ones keep life worth living.”—Minnesota Herald Tribune
 
“[An] elegiac, moving first novel.”—Newsday
 
“Arresting… This book cuts bone-deep.” —Austin Chronicle 
 
“Evocative and poetic...I loved this book from the first page.”—Huntington News
 
“Walker’s tone can be properly [Harper] Lee-esque; both Julia and Scout grapple with the standard childhood difficulties as their societies crumble around them. But life prevails, and the stunning Miracles subtly conveys that adapting.”—Time Out New York

“[A] gripping debut . . . Thompson’s Julia is the perfect narrator. . . . While the apocalypse looms large—has in fact already arrived—the narrative remains fiercely grounded in the surreal and horrifying day-to-day and the personal decisions that persist even though no one knows what to do. A triumph of vision, language, and terrifying momentum, the story also feels eerily plausible, as if the problems we’ve been worrying about all along pale in comparison to what might actually bring our end.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“In Walker’s stunning debut, a young California girl coming of age in a dystopian near future confronts the inevitability of change on the most personal level as life on earth withers … She goes through the trials and joys of first love. She begins to see cracks in her parents’ marriage and must navigate the currents of loyalty and moral uncertainty. She faces sickness and death of loved ones. ... Julia’s life is shaped by what happens in the larger world, but it is the only life she knows, and Walker captures each moment, intimate and universal, with magical precision. Riveting, heartbreaking, profoundly moving.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“What a remarkable and beautifully wrought novel. In its depiction of a world at once utterly like and unlike our own, The Age of Miracles is so convincingly unsettling that it just might make you stockpile emergency supplies of batteries and bottled water. It also—thank goodness—provides great solace with its wisdom, its compassion, and the elegance of its storytelling.”—Curtis Sittenfeld, author of Prep

“‘Miracles’ indeed. Karen Thompson Walker’s debut novel is a stunner from the first page—an end-of-the-world, coming-of-age tale of quiet majesty. I loved this novel and can’t wait to see what this remarkable writer will do next.”—Justin Cronin, author of The Passage

“Is the end near? In Karen Thompson Walker’s beautiful and frightening debut, sunsets are becoming rarities, “real-timers” live in daylight colonies while mainstream America continues to operate on the moribund system of “Clock Time,” and environmentalists rail against global dependence on crops that guzzle light. Against this apocalyptic backdrop, Walker sets the coming-of-age story of brave, bewildered Julia, who wonders at the “malleable rhythms” of the increasingly erratic adults around her. Like master fabulists Steven Millhauser and Kevin Brockmeier, Karen Thompson Walker takes a fantastic premise and makes it feel thrillingly real. In precise, poetic language, she floods the California suburbs with shadows and a doomsday glow, and in this altered light shows us amazing things about how one family responds to a stunningly imagined global crisis.”—Karen Russell, author of Swamplandia!

“This is what imagination is. In The Age of Miracles, the earth’s rotation slows, gravity alters, days are stretched out to fifty hours of sunlight. In the midst of this, a young girl falls in loves, sees things she shouldn't and suffers heartbreak of the most ordinary kind. Karen Thompson Walker has managed to combine fiction of the dystopian future with an incisive and powerful portrait of our personal present.”—Amy Bloom, author of Away
 
The Age of Miracles is pure magnificence. Deeply moving and beautifully executed, Karen Thompson Walker has written the perfect novel for the global-warming age.”—Nathan Englander, author of For the Relief of Unbearable Urges

“Reading The Age of Miracles is like gazing into a sky of constellations and being mesmerized by the the strange yet familiar sensation of infinity. Beautifully written, the novel lets the readers see the world within us and the world without with an unforgettable freshness.”—Yiyun Li, author of Gold Boy, Emerald Girl

The Age of Miracles spins its glowing magic through incredibly lucid and honest prose, giving equal care and dignity to the small spheres and the large. It is at once a love letter to the world as we know it and an elegy.”—Aimee Bender, author of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake
 
“Gripping from first page to last, The Age of Miracles is itself a small, perfectly formed miracle: Written with the cadence and pitch of poetry, this gem of a novel is a wrenching and all-too-believable parable for our times, and one of the most original coming-of-age stories I have ever read. Karen Thompson Walker is the real deal.”—Dani Shapiro, author of Devotion

The Age of Miracles is harrowing and beautiful on the ways in which those catastrophes already hidden about us in plain sight, once ratcheted up just a bit, provide us with a glimpse of the end of our species’ run on earth: the uncanny distress of hundreds of beached whales, or the surreal unease of waves rolling across the rooftops of beachfront houses. And as it does it reminds us of all of the miracles of human regard that will have taken place before then: the way compassion will retain its resilience, and the way, for those of us in love, a string of afternoons will be as good as a year.”—Jim Shepard, author of Like You’d Understand, Anyway (National Book Award finalist)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780812992977
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/26/2012
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 530,698
  • Product dimensions: 1.30 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Karen Thompson Walker is a graduate of UCLA and the Columbia MFA program and a recipient of the 2011 Sirenland Fellowship as well as a Bomb magazine fiction prize. A former editor at Simon & Schuster, she wrote The Age of Miracles in the mornings before work. Born and raised in San Diego, she now lives in Brooklyn with her husband. The Age of Miracles is her first book.

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Read an Excerpt

1.

We didn’t notice right away. We couldn’t feel it.

We did not sense, at first, the extra time, bulging from the smooth edge of each day like a tumor blooming beneath skin.

We were distracted, back then, by weather and war. We had no interest in the turning of the earth. Bombs continued to explode on the streets of distant countries. Hurricanes came and went. Summer ended. A new school year began. The clocks ticked as usual. Seconds beaded into minutes. Minutes grew into hours. And there was nothing to suggest that those hours too weren’t still pooling into days, each the same, fixed length known to every human being.

But there were those who would later claim to have recognized the disaster before the rest of us did. These were the night workers, the graveyard shifters, the stockers of shelves, and the loaders of ships, the drivers of big-rig trucks, or else they were the bearers of different burdens: the sleepless and the troubled and the sick. These people were accustomed to waiting out the night. Through bloodshot eyes, a few did detect a certain persistence of darkness on the mornings leading up to the news, but each mistook it for the private misperception of a lonely, rattled mind.

On the sixth of October, the experts went public. This, of course, is the day we all remember. There’d been a change, they said, a slowing, and that’s what we called it from then on: the slowing.

“We have no way of knowing if this trend will continue,” said a shy bearded scientist at a hastily arranged press conference, now infamous. He cleared his throat and swallowed. Cameras flashed in his eyes. Then came the moment, replayed so often afterward that the particular cadences of that scientist’s speech—the dips and the pauses and that slight Midwestern slant—would be forever married to the news itself. He went on: “But we suspect that it will continue.”

Our days had grown by fifty-six minutes in the night.

At the beginning, people stood on street corners and shouted about the end of the world. Counselors came to talk to us at school. I remember watching Mr. Valencia next door fill up his garage with stacks of canned food and bottled water, as if preparing, it now seems to me, for a disaster much more minor.

The grocery stores were soon empty, the shelves sucked clean like chicken bones.

The freeways clogged immediately. People heard the news and they wanted to move. Families piled into minivans and crossed state lines. They scurried in every direction like small animals caught suddenly under a light.

But, of course, there was nowhere on earth to go.

2.

The news broke on a Saturday.

In our house, at least, the change had gone unnoticed. We were still asleep when the sun came up that morning, and so we sensed nothing unusual in the timing of its rise. Those last few hours before we learned of the slowing remain preserved in my memory—even all these years later—as if trapped behind glass.

My friend Hanna had slept over the night before, and we’d camped out in sleeping bags on the living room floor, where we’d slept side by side on a hundred other nights. We woke to the purring of lawn mower motors and the barking of dogs, to the soft squeak of a trampoline as the twins jumped next door. In an hour we’d both be dressed in blue soccer uniforms—hair pulled back, sunscreen applied, cleats clicking on tile.

“I had the weirdest dream last night,” said Hanna. She lay on her stomach, her head propped up on one elbow, her long blonde hair hanging tangled behind her ears. She had a certain skinny beauty that I wished I had too.

“You always have weird dreams,” I said.

She unzipped her sleeping bag and sat up, pressed her knees to her chest. From her slim wrist there jingled a charm bracelet crowded with charms. Among them: one half of a small brass heart, the other half of which belonged to me.

“In the dream, I was at my house, but it wasn’t my house,” she went on. “I was with my mom, but she wasn’t my mom. My sisters weren’t my sisters.”

“I hardly ever remember my dreams,” I said, and then I got up to let the cats out of the garage.

My parents were spending that morning the way I remember them spending every morning, reading the newspaper at the dining room table. I can still see them sitting there: my mother in her green bathrobe, her hair wet, skimming quickly through the pages, while my father sat in silence, fully dressed, reading every story in the order it appeared, each one reflected in the thick lenses of his glasses.

My father would save that day’s paper for a long time afterward—packed away like an heirloom, folded neatly beside the newspaper from the day I was born. The pages of that Saturday’s paper, printed before the news was out, report a rise in the city’s real estate prices, the further erosion of several area beaches, and plans for a new freeway overpass. That week, a local surfer had been attacked by a great white shark; border patrol agents discovered a three-mile long drug-running tunnel six feet beneath the U.S./Mexico border; and the body of a young girl, long missing, was found buried under a pile of white rocks in the wide, empty desert out east. The times of that day’s sunrise and sunset appear in a chart on the back page, predictions that did not, of course, come to pass.

Half an hour before we heard the news, my mother went out for bagels.

I think the cats sensed the change before we did. They were both Siamese, but different breeds. Chloe was sleepy and feathery and sweet. Tony was her opposite: an old and anxious creature, possibly mentally ill, a cat who tore out his own fur in snatches and left it in piles around the house, tiny tumbleweeds set adrift on the carpet.

In those last few minutes, as I ladled dry food into their bowls, the ears of both cats began to swivel wildly toward the front yard. Maybe they felt it, somehow, a shift in the air. They both knew the sound of my mother’s Volvo pulling into the driveway, but I wondered later if they recognized also the unusually quick spin of the wheels as she rushed to park the car, or the panic in the sharp crack of the parking brake as she yanked it into place.

Soon, even I could detect the pitch of my mother’s mood from the stomps of her feet on the porch, the disorganized rattle of her keys against the door—she had heard those earliest news reports, now notorious, on the car radio between the bagel shop and home.

“Turn on the TV right now,” she said. She was breathless and sweaty. She left her keys in the teeth of the lock, where they would dangle all day. “Something God awful is happening.”

We were used to my mother’s rhetoric. She talked big. She blustered. She overstated and oversold. God awful might have meant anything. It was a wide net of a phrase that scooped up a thousand possibilities, most of them benign: hot days and traffic jams, leaking pipes and long lines. Even cigarette smoke, if it wafted too close, could be really and truly God awful.

We were slow to react. My father, in his thinning yellow Padres t-shirt, stayed right where he was at the table, one palm on his coffee cup, the other resting on the back of his neck, as he finished an article in the business section. I went ahead and opened the bag of bagels, letting the paper crinkle beneath my fingers. Even Hanna knew my mother well enough to go right on with what she was doing—hunting for the cream cheese on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.

“Are you watching this?” my mother said. We were not.

My mother had been an actress once. Her old commercials—mostly hair care and kitchen products—lay entombed together in a short stack of dusty black videotapes that stood beside the television. People were always telling me how beautiful she was when she was young, and I could still find it in the fair skin of her face and the high structure of her cheekbones, but she’d gained weight in middle age. Now she taught one period of drama at the high school and four periods of history. We lived 95 miles from Hollywood.

She was standing on our sleeping bags, two feet from the television screen. When I think of it now, I imagine her cupping one hand over her mouth the way she always did when she worried, but at the time, I just felt embarrassed by the way the black waffle soles of her running shoes were twisting Hanna’s sleeping bag, hers the dainty cotton kind, pink and polka-dotted and designed not for the hazards of campsites but exclusively for the plush carpets of heated homes.

“Did you hear me?” said my mother, swinging round to look at us. My mouth was full of bagel and cream cheese. A sesame seed had lodged itself between my two front teeth. “Joel!” she shouted at my father. “I’m serious. This is hellacious.”

My father looked up from the paper then, but still he kept his index finger pressed firmly to the page to mark his place. How could we have known that the workings of the universe had finally made appropriate the fire of my mother’s words?

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Interviews & Essays

A Conversation with Karen Thompson Walker
What inspired you to write a story about the earth's rotation slowing?
I got the idea from a newspaper article. Shortly after the 2004 Indonesian earthquake, I read that the earthquake had affected the rotation of the earth, shortening the length of our 24-hour day. Even though the change was extremely slight—only a few microseconds—I found the idea incredibly haunting. It was unsettling to discover that something we take for granted—the daily rising and the setting of our sun—was actually in flux. I couldn't help wondering what would have happened if the change had been larger. That's when I began to write this story.
How does the slowing and the events that happen during it affect the main character, 12-year-old Julia?
?For Julia, the slowing and its consequences complicate and magnify all the small-scale disasters of growing up. Julia loses her best friend when her friend's family joins extended relatives in Utah to wait for what they think will be the end of the world. Julia's mother begins to suffer from a mysterious illness known as gravity syndrome, and her father becomes increasingly withdrawn. But the looming threat of the slowing also intensifies Julia's small joys, especially when she begins to form a close bond with a boy who is as isolated as she is. As I wrote this book, I discovered that one of the hidden pleasures of apocalyptic stories is the surprising way they focus attention on ordinary life. When everyday life is in peril, everyday life begins to seem especially meaningful.
Why did you decide to title the book The Age of Miracles?
?I chose The Age of Miracles as a title because the book is about a time when events that previously seemed impossible suddenly become possible. I wanted the title to refer to not only the strange era of "the slowing," but also to another extraordinary era: adolescence. For Julia, both of these ages are unfolding at once, one every bit as astonishing as the other.
You were working as an editor at a publishing house while you wrote this book. How did you find the time to write?
It was definitely a challenge. I wrote this book in the mornings before I went to work. I tried to write for about an hour each day, but there were plenty of mornings when I slept late or when I had to be at work early. Some days I wrote only one sentence, just in my head, as I walked from my apartment to the subway. Sometimes I felt my progress was frustratingly slow, but working as an editor also made me a better writer, so I'm very grateful for that.
Who have you discovered lately?
?As an editor, I read Charlotte Rogan's amazing debut novel, The Lifeboat, [Also a Summer 2012 Discover selection. -Ed.] when it was still in manuscript. I read it in one night, and I really wanted my company to publish it, but we lost it to another house. It's such a wonderful combination of beautiful writing and suspenseful storytelling.
Some of my other recent favorites are Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro [Whose third novel, The Remains of the Day, was a discover selection in 1990. -Ed.], In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick and The Vagrants by Yiyun Li.

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Reading Group Guide

1. As readers, why do you think we’re  drawn to stories  about the  end of the world? What special pleasures  do these  kinds of narratives offer? And how do you think this element works in The Age of Miracles?

2. Julia is an only child.  How  does this fact affect who she is and how  she  sees the world? How would her experience  of the slowing  be different  if she  had  a sibling? How would her experience of middle  school be different?

3. How much do you think  the slowing alters Julia’s experience of adolescence? If the slowing  had never happened, in what ways would her childhood  have been different?  In what ways would  it have been the same?

4.  Julia’s parents’ marriage becomes increasingly  strained  over the course of the book. Why do you think they stay together? Do you think it’s the right choice? How much do you think Julia’s mother does or does not know about Sylvia?

5. Julia’s father tells several crucial lies. Discuss  these lies and consider which ones, if any, are justified and which  ones are not.  Is lying  ever the right  thing  to do? If so, when?

6. How  would  the  book change if it were  narrated by Julia’s mother? What if it were narrated by Julia’s father? Or her grandfather?

7. Why do you think Julia is so drawn to Seth? Why do you think he is drawn to her?

8. Did you identify more with the clock-timers or with the real-timers? Which would you be and why?

9. The slowing affects the whole planet, but the book is set in southern  California.  How  does the setting  affect the book? How important is it that  the story  takes place in California?

10. How  do you feel about the way the book ends? What  do you think lies ahead for  Julia,  for  her  parents,  and for  the world?

11. The slowing throws the natural world into disarray. Plants and animals   die  and there  are changes in the  weather. Did this book make you think about the threats that face our own natural world? Do you think the book has something  to say about climate change?

12. If you woke up tomorrow  to the news that the rotation  of the earth had significantly  slowed, how do you think you would respond? What is the first thing  you would do?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 287 )
Rating Distribution

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4 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 287 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 27, 2012

    I loved the voice the author gave to Julia throughout the book.

    I loved the voice the author gave to Julia throughout the book. I found all of the characters relatable and full of depth. The story wows you as it weaves it's depictions of the huge catastrophe happening outside into the every day mundane. I found myself looking at my world a little differently as I read. I would definitely recommend!
    My only critique is the ending. I was left wanting a more concrete answer, but as the good books often do, I found myself having to guess at what the future for these characters would hold.

    31 out of 34 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 30, 2012

    One of the most engrossing books I've read in years, The Age of

    One of the most engrossing books I've read in years, The Age of Miracles tells the story of the end of the innocence and blind faith of childhood against the background of our world on the edge of extinction. As the world begins to crumble and deteriorate around us, so does Julia's childhood, and a haunting story of the inevitability of loss unfolds. This is a a fabulous display from a prmising new author.

    30 out of 32 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 28, 2012

    loved, loved this book. Could not put it down - finished it in

    loved, loved this book. Could not put it down - finished it in a day. I look forward to more from this author

    18 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 28, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    fantastic book. makes you see the world in a new way. highly r

    fantastic book. makes you see the world in a new way. highly recommended.

    17 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2012

    Fantastic Page-Turner

    An extremely well-written piece. Mrs. Walker was able to make Julia into someone I cared about on the rare level of greats like Stephen King. All of Julia's hopes, triumphs, and heartbreaks resonate from the pages, culminating in the most distinct message we all hope to leave when we are in that same point in our lives, and beyond. The book ended quickly, but appropriately, and I was so engrossed in the story that I didn't realize I was near the end until a mere ten or so pages from it.

    An excellent debut novel, I look forward to more releases from Mrs. Walker.

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2012

    Awesome!

    I love, love, love this book and all the characters! I finished it in 2 days! It's so full of suspense, I couldn't put it down.

    11 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 1, 2012

    Is That All There Is?

    The story was an engrossing one but it ended with a disappointing fizzle. It left me crying for at least some kind of explanation or denouement. Perhaps a sequel is in the works.

    9 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2012

    dont Don't bother

    Easy read but boring,no depth to characters, just a dull narrative

    8 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 27, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Very good book. Full of suspense. Was sorry to see it end

    Very good book. Full of suspense. Was sorry to see it end

    8 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 6, 2012

    This book lured me in from start to finish.  It's one of those b

    This book lured me in from start to finish.  It's one of those books that takes you to another place, and you feel like you actually live in its setting and know its characters on a personal level.  I also enjoyed this new idea of the end of the world -- the slowing of its rotation.  It engrossed me simply because it's a fresh idea that hasn't been over-done by other means of media and entertainment.  The only problem I had with the book was its ending -- to me, it didn't feel resolved.   But, I didn't dwell on that too much because regardless of its ending, it was such a powerful book that had me in its grip all the way through.  Read it!  You won't be sorry.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2012

    Good Summer Read

    Really goid read fir the summer not so much about tge end of the world and more about the end of innocence of childhiod

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2012

    Intriguing

    This book was a quick read from an intriguing point of view. I enjoyed it very much & would read more from this author in the future!

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2012

    Great read!

    I loved this book. Read it in a day. Can't stop thinking about it.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2012

    Beautiful.

    I read a review that said this book is "science fiction, but not" and that really sums it up well. I loved it, though the ending seemed a bit tacked on and rushed..still, it's a small quibble and doesn't at all detract from the rest of the novel.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2012

    Worth a read!

    What would happen if the earth's rotation progressively slowed? As seen through the eyes of a lonely 12 year old who watches as things fall apart both on the outside and at home. At 225 pages a brisk, engaging read which makes the unimageable quite real.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2012

    Loved it!

    Definitely a good read. Finished it in two days!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2012

    Loved it

    What would happen if the world slowed down its rotation? How would that impact our everyday life? The story of first love makes the loss and sadness even more real. A wonderful summer book. Very thought-provoking and touching.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 26, 2012

    Spectacular Debut Novel!!

    Told from the view of an 11 year old girl going through the aches and pains of puberty, greatly compliments the changing of the planet. This book is scientifically well founded and you can tell if you watch as much Science Channel as I do. This is a great book club book! Please read it and help support this author!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 24, 2012

    Thought provoking good read

    I found the book very engrossing if somewhat disturbing. While the reason for the planet's demise was left unanswered it painted a haunting picture of what could happen to our planet if we continue to treat it poorly. Really liked the characters. I felt the end came a little abruptly but not jarringly so.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2012

    Interesting concept, but falls flat

    Most of this book was well written and provided an interesting concept. However, it felt as if the author ran out of ideas. I was very disappointed with the ending. It probably ended too soon.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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