The Age of Sacred Terror: Radical Islam's War Against America

The Age of Sacred Terror: Radical Islam's War Against America

by Daniel K. Benjamin, Steven Simon, Jonathan Marosz
     
 

Two of the country's leading anti-terrorism experts probe to the heart of 9/11, examining the plots and conspiracies that led up to that dread day, and showing us the need for continued vigilance against future threats. For those of us who believe that the current danger comes only from Osama Bin Laden and Al-Quaeda, Benjamin and Simon show that they are only part

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Overview

Two of the country's leading anti-terrorism experts probe to the heart of 9/11, examining the plots and conspiracies that led up to that dread day, and showing us the need for continued vigilance against future threats. For those of us who believe that the current danger comes only from Osama Bin Laden and Al-Quaeda, Benjamin and Simon show that they are only part of a larger and more durable phenomenon. By going over the course of events beginning with the 1993 attack on the World Trade Center, and revealing the details of many hitherto secret foiled attempts at terror, they show a consistent plan on the part of the Islamic jihadists which America slept through during the 1990s. This is an alarming but necessary book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780736688307
Publisher:
Books on Tape, Inc.
Publication date:
02/01/2002

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CHAPTER 1 DAYBREAK

The first killing of the Terror was carried out by an Egyptian in Manhattan. The weapon was not a Boeing 767 but a chrome-plated .357 Magnum, and the attack happened in the conference room of a midtown hotel. One man was killed; two others were injured. Years would pass before anyone realized that the event was more than the solitary act of a deranged man.

On November 5, 1990, El-Sayyid Nosair rushed toward the podium in the Morgan D Room of the Marriott East Side Hotel. Just to the side of the microphone, Meir Kahane was signing books and greeting members of the audience for the speech he had just finished. As he neared the front of the room, Nosair aimed his gun and fired. The bullet tore into Kahane's neck and exited through his cheek. As blood poured from his mouth, Kahane raised his hands to his head and fell backward. The shooter spun and ran toward the exit, but just before the door, he was grabbed by a seventy-three-year-old man named Irving Franklin. Nosair kept moving and dragged Franklin a couple of yards before shooting him in the leg to get free. He sprinted from the hotel and jumped in a cab, thinking it was the getaway car he had arranged. It wasn't. Nosair jammed the gun into the back of the cabbie's head and screamed at him to drive. But traffic was moving slowly, and when a student who had been at Kahane's lecture and chased after Nosair jumped in front of the cab, the driver slid out the door and took off. Nosair abandoned the car, too, but he ran into the path of a Postal Service policeman. Nosair shot and wounded the officer, who returned fire, dropping the Egyptian with a neck wound.

As he lay bleeding on the sidewalk,El-Sayyid Nosair was sure he had changed the course of history.

He believed this because of his bizarre reading of Israeli politics. Kahane was a Brooklyn rabbi who founded the Jewish Defense League and then immigrated to Israel and established the Kach party, which was banned from his country's parliament in 1988 because of its blatant racism-the group advocated, for example, the expulsion of Arabs from Israel and the Occupied Territories. Yet Nosair was convinced that Kahane was destined to be the leader of the Jewish state and a force in global affairs: "They were preparing him to dominate, to be the prime minister someday," he would later say. "They were preparing him despite their assertion that they reject his agenda and that he is a racist."

A thirty-four-year-old from the northeastern Egyptian city of Port Said, Nosair had moved to the United States in 1981 with a university degree in engineering in hand. He was not a happy immigrant. His sister in Egypt later related that he disliked America, saying, "He didn't like the morality there."1 Nonetheless, he stayed, married an American woman, and moved to New Jersey, bouncing from job to job and winding up as a heating and air-conditioning repairman for the City of New York.

To investigators, he seemed mentally disturbed, and a police official described him as depressed. A month after the shooting, a federal investigator said, "Either the man is a lone nut, or he's a lone nut and someone whispered something in his ear knowing he'd do it. Or there's an enormous international conspiracy."2 Authorities quickly settled on the first hypothesis. Their belief that there was nothing more to the case-and, perhaps, the refusal of Kahane's Orthodox family to allow a full autopsy-helps explain the shoddiness of the case prosecutors put together. At...

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