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The Alamo Remembered: Tejano Accounts and Perspectives [NOOK Book]

Overview

As Mexican soldiers fought the mostly Anglo-American colonists and volunteers at the Alamo in 1836, San Antonio?s Tejano population was caught in the crossfire, both literally and symbolically. Though their origins were in Mexico, the Tejanos had put down lasting roots in Texas and did not automatically identify with the Mexican cause. Indeed, as the accounts in this new collection demonstrate, their strongest allegiance was to their fellow San Antonians, with whom they shared a common history and a common plight...
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The Alamo Remembered: Tejano Accounts and Perspectives

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Overview

As Mexican soldiers fought the mostly Anglo-American colonists and volunteers at the Alamo in 1836, San Antonio’s Tejano population was caught in the crossfire, both literally and symbolically. Though their origins were in Mexico, the Tejanos had put down lasting roots in Texas and did not automatically identify with the Mexican cause. Indeed, as the accounts in this new collection demonstrate, their strongest allegiance was to their fellow San Antonians, with whom they shared a common history and a common plight as war raged in their hometown. Timothy M. Matovina here gathers all known Tejano accounts of the Battle of the Alamo. These accounts consist of first reports of the battle, including Juan N. Seguín’s funeral oration at the interment ceremony of the Alamo defenders, conversations with local Tejanos, unpublished petitions and depositions, and published accounts from newspapers and other sources. This communal response to the legendary battle deepens our understanding of the formation of Mexican American consciousness and identity.
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Editorial Reviews

Review of Texas Books
The first full-scale collection offers a rich insight into the formation of Mexican American identity in San Antonio. . . . [The book] speaks eloquently to a general audience trying to gain a more balanced perspective of the storied conflict [at the Alamo].
Southwestern Historical Quarterly
Matovina's message is that historians who concentrate on the question of which side [Tejanos] joined or did not join miss the larger point: for the Tejanos themselves, the choice of sides during the revolt was not the overriding issue of their lives, nor was it the touchstone of their identity. What the Tejano accounts of the Alamo show, Matovina argues, is that the divisions engendered by the revolution failed to destroy what remained 'an amazingly cohesive community' in which families, friends, and neighbors split apart by the war reunited in harmony in its aftermath.
Journal of the American Studies Association of Texas
Matovina's collection of Tejano memories of the Alamo not only proves essential in shedding light on the battle and its aftermath but, more importantly, contributes to an understanding of an understudied culture and that culture's effect on the most romanticized story of Texas history.
Journal of the West
A valuable addition to the already abundant [Alamo] literature. . . . Ordinarily, the battle of the Alamo is considered in a traditional adversarial manner—Santa Anna and his troops against the band of defenders. But there were many other people in the area, primarily Tejano citizens of San Antonio. These accounts both directly and indirectly deal with what was inevitably an ambivalent and uncertain dilemma of these people who were caught in circumstances beyond their control. It is an aspect of the battle of the Alamo too long ignored.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780292759909
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • Publication date: 12/6/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 781,871
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Timothy Matovina is Professor of Theology and Executive Director of the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana.
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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction 1
1 Andres Barcena and Anselmo Bergara, Examination by Texas Military Officials, 11 March 1836 17
2 Andres Barcena and Anselmo Bergara, Letter of E. N. Gray, 11 March 1836 18
3 Juan N. Seguin, Letter to General Albert Sidney Johnston, 13 March 1837 19
4 Juan N. Seguin, Columbia (later Houston) Telegraph and Texas Register, 4 April 1837 20
5 Anonymous Local Tejanos, Diary of William Bollaert, 19-20 September 1843 25
6 Jose Antonio Navarro, Diary of Josiah Gregg, 23 September 1846 26
7 Antonio Cruz Arocha, Papers of Theodore Gentilz, no date 27
8 Gabriel Martinez, Petition, 1 January 1850 31
9 Damasio de los Reyes, Deposition, 4 September 1856 32
10 Juana Navarro Alsbury, Petition, 1 November 1857 32
11 Francisco Esparza, Deposition, 26 August 1859 33
12 Candelario Villanueva, Deposition, 26 August 1859 35
13 Brigidio Guerrero, Petition, 4 January 1861 36
14 Francisco Antonio Ruiz, Deposition, 16 April 1861 37
15 Juan N. Seguin, Personal Memoirs of John N. Seguin, 1858 41
16 Francisco Antonio Ruiz, The Texas Almanac for 1860 42
17 Juana Navarro Alsbury, John S. Ford Memoirs, c. 1880s 45
18 Juan N. Seguin, Clarksville Standard, 4 March 1887 48
19 Juan N. Seguin, Letter to William Winston Fontaine, 7 June 1890 50
20 Andrea Castanon Villanueva, San Antonio Express, 6 March 1892 51
21 Eulalia Yorbnna, San Antonio Express, 12 April 1896 53
22 Andrea Castanon Villanueva, San Antonio Light, 19 February 1899 57
23 Enrique Esparza, San Antonio Light, 10 November 1901 62
24 Enrique Esparza, San Antonio Express, 22 November 1902 66
25 Pablo Diaz, San Antonio Express, 1 July 1906 72
26 Enrique Esparza, San Antonio Express, 12, 19 May 1907 77
27 Maria de Jesus Delgado Buquor, San Antonio Express, 19 July 1907 89
28 Juan Diaz, San Antonio Light, 1 September 1907 92
29 Juan Antonio Chavez, San Antonio Express, 15, 22 December 1907 95
30 Pablo Diaz, San Antonio Light, 31 October 1909 96
31 Juan Vargas, San Antonio Light, 3 April 1910 99
32 Enrique Esparza, Pablo Diaz, and Juan Antonio Chavez, San Antonio Express, 26 March 1911 101
33 Juan Diaz, Enrique Esparza, and Juan Antonio Chavez, San Antonio Express, 27 August 1911 106
34 Trinidad Coy, As Recalled by His Son Andres Coy, San Antonio Light, 26 November 1911 107
35 Jose Maria Rodriguez, Rodriguez Memoirs of Early Texas, 1913 113
36 Juan Antonio Chavez, San Antonio Express, 19 April 1914 116
37 Antonio Menchaca, Memoirs, 1937 117
Tejano Alamo Accounts: Collective Legacy 121
Bibliography 127
Index 135
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