The Almanac of American Politics, 2008

The Almanac of American Politics, 2008

5.0 1
by Michael Barone, Richard E. Cohen
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

How was the 1998 election different from all other elections? Not in party strength: Republicans and Democrats won almost exactly the same percentages of the vote and number of House seats as in 1996. Nor was there any great mandate for change: Only a handful of incumbents were defeated. Turnout was unchanged, too, staying for the most part within the same 36 percent…  See more details below

Overview

How was the 1998 election different from all other elections? Not in party strength: Republicans and Democrats won almost exactly the same percentages of the vote and number of House seats as in 1996. Nor was there any great mandate for change: Only a handful of incumbents were defeated. Turnout was unchanged, too, staying for the most part within the same 36 percent to 40 percent range of all off-year elections in the past quarter century.

The difference was a fundamental change in mood. In 1998, Americans voted against what a classic 1988 editorial in The Economist called "crunchiness" and for what the magazine called "sogginess." Crunchy choices are binary; the light switch is either off or on, with clearly distinct consequences. Soggy choices represent only a marginal, perhaps imperceptible change. In the prosperous, peaceful late 1990s, Americans were comfortable with the incorrigibly soggy Bill Clinton—and deeply uncomfortable with the aggressive crunchiness of the most visible congressional Republican, Newt Gingrich. The 1998 elections—and elections are always a crunchy process—saw no significantly different partisan balance. But they did produce very different outcomes for the two party leaders.

The Almanac of American Politics 2000, which very much tends to the crunchy side, is a vital tool in assessing today's increasingly soggy political scene. No other book offers so much information plus such a clear road map to our political present and future (be it crunchy or soggy). In addition to a provocative new Introduction by Michael Barone, this completely updated edition includes:

  • Insightful, colorful profiles and photographs of all 535 members of Congress and all 50 governors
  • Voting records on important legislation
  • Revealing descriptions of each state and congressional district with historical, economic, social, and political background information
  • Congressional ratings by National Journal and a dozen influential interest groups
  • Updated maps showing each congressional district, including recent redistricting changes
  • 1998 election results for each member of Congress and presidential results by congressional district
  • Exclusive election forecasts for every 2000 race from Washington's foremost political handicapper, Charlie Cook
  • Access to the Almanac Web Edition, providing up-to-date information on key votes of the 106th Congress, results from special and interim elections, and more

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Politico.com - Jonathan Martin

 “The indispensable resource for anybody who takes campaigns and elections seriously. Published since 1971, it offers richly detailed analysis on both national and state politics. Broken down by state and congressional district, it offers not just background on a given member or senator’s voting record, but expansive insight on the history, culture and demographics that shape a region’s voting patterns. It was founded by Michael Barone and is now produced by a trio that collectively know more about politics than anybody else in the hemisphere. . . . Whether you’re on the beach or at the lake, prop up your feet and dive into a random state or district. You’ll come away with an invaluable political education.”

Washington Post - Al Kamen

“Filled with enough facts to satisfy most any political junkie.”

washingtonpost.com - Chris Cillizza

 “The one book that EVERY political junkie should want under the tree this year. The Almanac of American Politics is—simply put—the book The Fix would bring with him if he was stranded on a desert island. Not only does it have detailed information about each member of Congress and his or her district, it’s filled with the sort of quirky facts and minutiae that make politics so great. . . . What else can we say? Go. Buy. This. Book.”

weeklystandard.com - Matthew Continetti

“Fascinating.”

realclearpolitics.com - Reid Wilson

“The Bible for political junkies. . . . The Almanac also sheds some light on the more fun side of Congress. . . . Don’t forget that Ohio Congressman Dennis Kucinich is the only member of Congress to list all the bowling allies in his district on his Congressional Web site.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780892341177
Publisher:
National Journal Group
Publication date:
10/29/2007
Series:
Almanac of American Politics (Paperback)
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
1850
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 2.10(d)

Meet the Author

Michael Barone is a senior writer at U.S. News and World Report and a Fox News Channel contributor. His most recent book is Hard America, Soft America.
 
Richard E. Cohen has thirty years of experience covering Capitol Hill as National Journal’s congressional correspondent. The author of a biography of former Representative Dan Rostenkowski, in 1990 he won the prestigious Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for distinguished reporting on Congress.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >