The Almond Tree

( 34 )

Overview

Gifted with a mind that continues to impress the elders in his village, Ichmad Hamid struggles with knowing that he can do nothing to save his friends and family. Living on occupied land, his entire village operates in fear of losing their homes, jobs, and belongings. But more importantly, they fear losing each other.

On Ichmad’s twelfth birthday, that fear becomes reality.

With his father imprisoned, his family’s home and possessions ...

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Overview

Gifted with a mind that continues to impress the elders in his village, Ichmad Hamid struggles with knowing that he can do nothing to save his friends and family. Living on occupied land, his entire village operates in fear of losing their homes, jobs, and belongings. But more importantly, they fear losing each other.

On Ichmad’s twelfth birthday, that fear becomes reality.

With his father imprisoned, his family’s home and possessions confiscated, and his siblings quickly succumbing to hatred in the face of conflict, Ichmad begins an inspiring journey using his intellect to save his poor and dying family. In doing so he reclaims a love for others that was lost through a childhood rife with violence and loss, and discovers a new hope for the future.

‘Let’s make this the next Kite Runner!’ Ricciarda Barbieri, Feltrinelli
‘Last night I could hardly sleep. I am excited. From the first 50 pages I knew that I wanted to publish the novel in our Amsterdam imprint. (...) I really loved it, it had me gripped, it made me cry (more than laugh), it made me think and, in a way, it transformed me, which is what I ask most of in a book. Yes, yes, yes, we want to publish it!’
Izaskun Arretxe, editor and director, Ara Llibres
‘It has been a long time since a book struck me so hard. (…) It is an honest novel. There is no death or tragedy in it that leaves you indifferent or that comes across as sensationalist. (…) I felt captured from the first moment by her voice and her style. It is an honest story, exciting, with touching moments… It addresses a subject which is always present. A novel that shows pain, but also hope.’
Carol París, foreign fiction editor, Ediciones B
‘We have read The Almond Tree, and we simply love it! It’s such a beautiful and strong story – and it made me cry several times. We will do our best to make sure that this beautiful novel gets all the readers it deserves.’
Inger Marit Hansen, editor, Schibsted Forlag
THE ALMOND TREE offers that rare combination of emotion and meaningfulness. The very complex situation in Palestine territories and Israel is dealt with in a very clever way that provides both humanizing insight and a perspective not often seen.
THE ALMOND TREE is an accessible commercial novel with a literary appeal. The characters are engaging and believable, and we sympathize deeply with them. The novel's perspective and the fact that the core of the story is a personal journey (against many odds) makes it enormously captivating. What really got me however –other than the simply gripping storytelling- is that this is a book which will make us think, it offers themes and points of view you want to discuss, and I can see reading groups are just waiting for a book like this. (...) To bring such a complex and sensitive subject down to a pure human story is a great achievement, and - next to the great reading experience this book provides - I also feel it's message of perseverance, unity and humanity is important and should be spread. THE ALMOND TREE is part a sad and poignant story that reflects the inherent absurdity of the situation Ichmad's family is in, and possibly of any family during war times. But more than that, this is a moving story of family love, hope and the power of dreams.’
Sander Knol, publisher, Xander Uitgevers

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
So how will Americans be able to put on those shoes and see through those eyes? By engaging in loud debate? Vociferous argument? Lengthy lectures? Probably not. Sometimes it takes a small thing, something unforeseen, to open eyes and galvanize opinion. How about a good story?

Yes, a good story. Here's one: a novel entitled The Almond Tree. The first novel of a Jewish New Yorker, Michelle Cohen Corasanti, an epic drama of the proportions of The Kite Runner, but set in Palestine. A story that grabs you from the first page and makes your heart go out to the Palestinians without pointing fingers at anyone. An adventure that brings you into the magical world that travelers once crossed on horseback or camel towards Beirut, Amman or Cairo. A land where for centuries Christians, Muslims and Jews shared their traditions. Where the children inherited the land, generation after generation, and the clans stayed together. Where courage was not the absence of fear, but the absence of selfishness. Where children learned a fundamental principle of life: decency.

Spanning six turbulent decades, The Almond Tree follows Ichmad, a gifted Palestinian boy from a small rural village, on a journey of painful enlightenment as he seeks to keep his family together while trying to make sense of the violent conflict that surrounds him. When he encounters hardships and obstacles, Ichamd must learn to respond without hatred and understand that soldiers are only human beings and that war is merely politics. This novel is not a political lecture, but a gripping and compassionate work of fiction that puts the reader in those shoes that Obama spoke of.

If Americans can find the time to read this novel, I believe they will be inspired to ask questions and do research. The next time they watch CBS, FOX, NBC or CNN, instead of anonymous refugees or 'terrorists,' they will see the faces of mothers with children, grandparents with grandchildren, parents with brothers. People going to work, returning from school, shopping in the market. People who can't pick the oranges from their own trees because the Israeli military have blocked them off. Students who can't accept their scholarships to Harvard or Yale because Israeli authorities don't allow them to leave Gaza. And then, those same Americans who have been silent and unaware will demand justice and peace. Because this wonderful story is not about being anti-Israel, but about helping Israel to live in peace with its Palestinians brothers and sisters. Through The Almond Tree we can step into the shoes of the Palestinians. Then, we will begin to see, with our own eyes, a glimmer of hope in solving a conflict that weighs so much on us all.

With the onset of adulthood, one already must cope with so much. The Almond Tree follows the struggles of young Ichmad Hamid as his family is lose to strife, imprisonment, and everything they hold dear. The twelve year old learns it may be on him to use his limited talents to help his family and bring back something of a life. The Almond Tree is a strong addition to coming of age fiction collections, highly recommended.

Corasanti’s accomplished debut novel offers a humanistic look into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict…Sensitive, moving and competently written, a complex novel as necessary as ever.

The Almond Tree by Michelle Cohen Corasanti is not the definitive Palestinian narrative, rather, it is the story of one Palestinian and his family. It is a work of fiction, but many of the incidents are based on things that really happened to the residents of Israeli Arab villages and the Gaza Strip. This is Ichmad’s story, told in a manner that strongly resembles the voice and narrative used by Khaled Hosseini in his popular novel, The Kite Runner.

This will not be easy reading for Israelis and Jews elsewhere, but it should be required reading. The pain and suffering described are that of the Palestinian protagonist. The victims of Palestinian terrorism are not mentioned because they play no role in Ichmad’s life. The narrative is clearly one-sided, but it is a side that is unknown to the Israeli public. Any chances of reconciliation and peaceful relations between Israelis and Palestinians depend on hearing and understanding what has taken place on the other side, and this is true in both directions.

"…Michelle Corasanti's profound and finely crafted debut novel tells the story of one man, Ichmad Hamid, from his humble beginnings as a scared and helpless child in an occupied village through to his inspirational rise to power and influence. This intimate tale of love and loss and awareness shines a greater understanding of the personal toll of the ongoing Israeli–Palestinian conflict."

"…beautifully written and exhibits an inherent knowledge of life in theOccupied Palestinian Territories and Gaza. Corasanti's elaboration of history and fiction has created a touching narration which ensnares the reader fromthe first chapter."

"The Almond Tree, intelligent, never over stated and written with love, informs and educates – it reminds us that there could be a better way to share this land and that if you allow intellect to blossom only good will come from it."

"Michelle has captured the pain, the sense of betrayal, the daily life, and the spirit of triumph that is ultimately an accurate portrayal of the Palestinians. Her instrument is fiction but her powerful prose and compelling characters raises The Almond Tree to the status of epic – the heroic story of a people just like us."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781859643297
  • Publisher: Garnet Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/30/2012
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 163,369
  • Product dimensions: 8.30 (w) x 5.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

MICHELLE COHEN CORASANTI has a BA from Hebrew University in Jerusalem and a MA from Harvard University, both in Middle Eastern Studies. She also holds a law degree. A Jewish American, she has lived in France, Spain, Egypt, and England, and spent seven years living in Israel. She currently lives in New York with her family. The Almond Tree is her first novel.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2013

    ¿The Almond Tree,¿ is one of the most moving and powerful novels

    “The Almond Tree,” is one of the most moving and powerful novels I’ve read. It’s the kind of book that takes the reader into another world, a world of poverty and war, brutality, sorrow and love. And in the process we become aware of ourselves as human beings; the beauty and the horror we create.

    What a ride. Man’s inhumanity to his fellow creatures is appalling, countered only by a deep sense of justice, compassion and a love for the truth whatever it is.

    Corasanti shines the light of awareness into the shadows of our ignorance and draws our attention to a deep injustice knowing that awareness gives rise to understanding and understanding to change. This conflict, this oppression, will not be able to continue in the light of awareness. We’ve not been outraged before because we didn’t know what was happening. Now that we know I hope we’re outraged enough to make our voices heard.

    Obama recently spoke to Jewish students. He said, “Put yourself in their shoes — look at the world through their eyes. It is not fair that a Palestinian child cannot grow up in a state of her own, and lives with the presence of a foreign army that controls the movements of her parents, every single day.”

    Awareness.

    So little of the history and ongoing events is known by Westerners. We’re ignorant and can’t afford to be! We have great wealth and power at the moment but it cannot last when we don’t give to others what we want for ourselves.

    And what do we want? Is it not to live at peace with our neighbors, to make a living, to care for our families and raise our children with a roof over our heads, clean water. food, fairness and justice?

    Life has its own way, and if we refuse to share what we have with others we won’t have it either.

    Corasanti’s story will move you, it will present you with a dilemma. No longer will you live in ignorance of the ongoing Palestinian/Israeli conflict and it is that shared and growing awareness that will in the end halt the destruction of the Palestinian people and restore compassion and justice to the Israeli soul.

    Colin Mallard,
    Comox, BC Canada.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2013

    If you are interested in the Middle East, you need to read this

    If you are interested in the Middle East, you need to read this book. The Almond Tree by Michelle Cohen Corasanti is a book that she felt had to write. She worked for five years to complete this story. It is fiction but it felt true. In fact, I found it very difficult to lay it down. I know so much more after reading this book than I did before. This is a serious book but also a hopeful one.

    Ichmad Hamid is unusually bright boy in mathematics and science. He learned to follow Einstein’s advice and do problems in his head to calm himself during crisis. He lived in a small village of Palestinian people with his parents and siblings. His father is a talented artist and extremely wise about people, war and forgiveness.

    If you had looked around the inside of his home at the beginning of this story, you would have seen many portraits and pictures done by his father of his family and different times in their lives.

    Amal, his younger sister innocently walked out the door of their house, into a field and was blown up by a landmine. They cannot bury her. Permits are needed by the Israelis to marry, to travel, to work, to build a home, to go to school to bury, to even buy fruit from was formerly their own trees. There is no freedom in occupied land.

    When Ichmad was only twelve, his father was imprisoned for a crime that he did not commit. His family was tear gassed out of their home by soldiers who said that they were terrorists. Sarah, one of his sisters tripped and hurt her forehead. Ichmad tried to breathe air into her but she died. The soldiers shot up the house with Uzis and then dynamited the remains.

    Everything was gone except for a lone almond tree that Ichmad had named Shahida or witness. His father was in the desert in a horrible prison. His mother was still like a child, not educated, bossy and very dependent. His brothers and sisters were all younger than him. How was this boy going to provide enough food to keep his family from starving? How was he going to protect them from the storms of nature and even worse the whims of the soldiers? How was he going to keep his promise to his father make something of himself?

    I wish everyone single would read this amazing book to be able to understand what it is really like to live in an occupied land. This book is one of hope, resilience and resourcefulness.

    I received this book from the Library Thing’s Member Giveaway but that in no way influenced my thoughts in this review.



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    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2012

    After being persecuted for decades, even centuries, how would a

    After being persecuted for decades, even centuries, how would a victimized culture finally handle being in control? I don’t know, and this is not the book of explanations. This is the story of those held back by the persecuted that have now become as hardened, paranoid and militarized as any group that ever mistreated them. This is the Palestinian point of view. One which I have only ever thought of as pitching rocks against machine guns. It is painful in its honesty, but still offers hope that we all might one day see the irrational attitudes that make it necessary to hold one group down in order to raise another. I put the book down wanting to know more about this constant struggle – but also touched by the characters that rose from the page and carefully explained their hopes and fears, dreams and disasters and made me believe that there is always something any one of us can do to make this world a better place. It is a fascinating story, with captivating people living through a history that can easily be believed to be hell on earth, just needing a little help to survive, much less overcome burdens no one should be forced to shoulder. Michelle Cohen Corasanti offers a chance to see families and not monsters caught in the cross-fire of modern politics.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 15, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The Almond Tree by Michelle Cohen Corasanti is a beautifully wri

    The Almond Tree by Michelle Cohen Corasanti is a beautifully written story told from the point of view of Ichmad Hamid. Told in four parts (and spanning decades) it begins with a seven-year old Ichmad making us painfully aware of real horrors and what loss really means. From the first page the reader is fully aware it's not a story for the light-hearted. 




    Living as a Palestinian in an Jewish Israeli controlled village, we start off in the 1950's, with Ichmad describing the horrofic circumstances and achingly real terror he feels living with soldiers that could destroy him and everything he loves at any given moment. 




    Through the decades he grows and struggles with his emotions and assumptions of others. He has spent his life being threatened, hurt and watching all he loves being taken by Israeli Jews that he can't trust them and deeply fears them. As he learns more of the world with time, he begins to accept that not all Israelis are as he perceived them. However, his family is firmly agains the idea and Ichmad is so bound by obligation and duty to his family, so driven by it, that they motivate his every action. Fear confines him, but passion for his work and love drive him forward. He must come to terms and fully understand his hatred for a race with which the only contact he ever had was controlling, aggressive and cruel. The people who continuously robbed him of everything he had.




    Ichmad has a unique gift. He is a mathematical genius and devotes his life to his cause, to his desire to learn, but he struggles to educate his family, to support them, especially his brother Abbas, whose hatred for Israelis Ichmad can never manage to overcome. His world is at war, Israel is in ruins and people are forced to live in wreckage and poverty. Living in a time when Palestinians hate the Jewish and Jewish Israelis hate the Palestinian Arabs, his life is constantly in turmoil. His younger self never feels safe, never has enough to eat and can only watch as his family suffers.




    A beautiful, heart-wrenching story. An educational and painfully real look into the life of a Palestinian boy living under an Israeli regime in the 50's, still trying to break free decades later. He inspires us all. Rising out of the ashes to find his passion and save his family, constantly hitting walls and having to rebuild from scratch, always returning to his symbol of hope- the constant presence of an almond tree by his childhood home. Haunting and not to be missed.




    Disclaimer: I received this book from the author. This is not a sponsored review. All opinions are 100% my own.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    A very powerfull human story about the struggle of a Palestinian

    A very powerfull human story about the struggle of a Palestinian boy under the occupation. It ia a story of struggle and hope at the same time. Highly recomend.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 19, 2012

    The general overtone of The Almond Tree is the plight of the Pal

    The general overtone of The Almond Tree is the plight of the Palestinians living under Israeli occupation. While The Almond Tree is a work of fiction, the writer lived in Israel for numerous years and her observations and experiences are the basis for many of the scenarios that play out on its pages. She does an excellent job of bringing the day to day misery of a people living under occupation for an entire generation. Yet, the book offers a glimmer of hope. A flickering of light in the darkness. It starts with forgiveness, the ability to accept past transgressions, no matter how horrific they may have been and move forward. It takes strength and perseverance. The heroes in the book all show these attributes as they stand up not only to their enemies, but to their family and friends, all of whom seem determined to foster the hatred. It is heartwarming to watch as they work tirelessly to tear down the walls and clear a path to a better life.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2012

    _The Almond Tree_, by Michelle Cohen Corasanti, is a powerful, b

    _The Almond Tree_, by Michelle Cohen Corasanti, is a powerful, beautifully visual, compelling and human story of the struggle for peace within, peace among people, and ultimately a goal for peace among nations. You will devour this provocative tale of haunting anguish, and triumph through empathy and education. You will come to know and appreciate the vibrant characters, for their frailty, humility, compassion, respect, self-respect and wisdom. For anyone who has ever cherished a child, _The Almond Tree_ is a must read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 27, 2013

    The Almond Tree is more than a beautiful compelling story. It is

    The Almond Tree is more than a beautiful compelling story. It is also very sad. Imagine the outcry if a 3 year old Canadian girl died because she chased a butterfly into a field next to her home. And unknown to her had entered a mine field, deliberately put there to kill whoever entered it.
    This is the story of a Palestinian family whose only crime was to live on a farm Israeli settlers wanted.
    The family, forced into a hovel and then a tent is pushed to the brink of extinction. The two oldest sons seek ways to save their family and their people. One confronts and returns the hatred and violence directed at him and his people. The other son, a gifted mathematician is provided with an education. Highly prized for his intelligence is able to escape the horrors his family must continue living with. He has to work with a Jewish professor, who despises and fears him. This difficult and frightening relationship leads eventually to an understanding that hatred and violence only make things worse and they eventually become friends.
    Both brothers act out of love for their family and for their people and yet both are powerless to change things.
    In reading The Almond Tree, and others such as, "Stillpoint" by Colin Mallard, we are confronted with the extent to which propaganda has blinded us to what is happening in Israel.
    The United States and Canada have by and large provided physical and moral support for the Israeli government and Israelis in general. In doing so they and their people have turned a blind eye to a great injustice on the scale of the holocaust:the slow steady destruction of the Palestinian people.
    No wonder we are the target of hated caused by the clash of fundamental Islam with fundamental, Christianity, and fundamental Judaism
    We live in a democracy and when enough people become aware of what is happening it can be halted before it's too late. If we want a world that is fair and safe for us we must ensure it for everyone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 29, 2013

    I received this in a giveaway drawing on another website.  I

    I received this in a giveaway drawing on another website. 



    I don't pay as much attention to the political conflicts in the world as I probably should, but I knew a little bit about the Palestinian situation from some research I had done in college. The thing this book did is put a face on the terrible consequences of what's happening there and what's happened in the past. This book allows you to see the history of the struggle between Israel and Palestine over the last 60 years or so. Through Ichmad Hamid and his family you get to see the conflict from different angles; from the side trying to make peace as well as the more militant side that refuses to give up the fight. Ichmad is a true genius, and his intelligence will take him far in the world. He attempts to straddle the line of taking care of his family while at the same time furthering his education. It's not an easy task. Ichmad's journey is filled with hope and horror in almost equal measure, and the way he handles what life throws at him makes for a highly uplifting read. Reading this book gave me a lot to think about, and I don't know what the answer is for Palestine. I'm not sure there is a truly good answer, but I do know that much of what has happened was wrong on both sides. I hope many people will read this book. It just might change the way people look at those who are different from themselves. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 12, 2013

    Book source: received for review via LibraryThing The Almond

    Book source: received for review via LibraryThing




    The Almond Tree tells the story of a young boy, Ichmad Hamid, who manages to succeed in life only thanks to his intelligence and good will. Caught in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Ichmad's family is left with no home or possesions, so he has to struggle to earn money and survive. Thanks to his natural talent in Sciences, Ichmad receives a scholarship to study in Israel (the country of the soldiers who killed two of his sisters and imprisoned his father), and later moves to America, from where he is able to help his family back home.




    By becoming a successful researcher, Ichmad manages to draw worldwide attention to the situation in Palestine, and to raise funds in order to help his compatriots. However, the story of the Palestinian Arabs has not yet come to an end, and we are witnessing the history being written from suffering and oppression.




    Although it saddened me a lot, I really enjoyed reading this book. There were many emotional, heart-warming moments, and the end was bright and motivational. It kept me captivated from the first page straight to the last, and even though I was relieved by the (almost) happy end, I still wanted more. There are so many things to be said about the conflict between the Istraeli and the Palestinians!




    The characters were well-described and I was able to put myself in the place of any of them. Each of the characters, either Arab or Israeli, faces great pain at some point. The book made me cry a lot and suffer along with the characters.




    Another aspect that I liked was that I got to learn many fascinating things about the Arabic culture, and I also had fun trying to solve Ichmad's Physics and Math problem. The readers who are interested in History, Sciences or Arts will surely enjoy this book.




    It is such a shame that all we do is to sit comfortably in front of our TV's, unaware of what is happening around us. It would not be bad to learn more about this subject and help, even just by spreading the alarm signal. The Almond Tree got me totally unprepared. I barely had an idea of what is happening in the Middle East, and I'm glad this book opened my eyes. I got captivated by the subject of this book and I will certainly read more of this kind.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2013

    An amazing read and although fiction, I know the events to be un

    An amazing read and although fiction, I know the events to be unfortunately based on reality. I highly recommend this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2013

    The opening scene for The Almond Tree pretty much sets the tone

    The opening scene for The Almond Tree pretty much sets the tone for the rest of the book and the story telling pace never really slows. It jumps from scene to scene without taking as much as a break. About half way through the book, I wanted one but it never came. I wondered whether the story would have benefited from a slower pace, a chance to get to know more than just the main character, Ichmad Hamid. The story is told through first person POV. There were so many others that drew my attention away from him: Baba, Abbas, Professor Sharon. But Ichmad was so likeable, so compelling, it was easy to forget about the others as his story progressed.
    Towards the end of the book, I asked myself the same question: would the book have benefited from a slower pace? I couldn’t answer for one simple reason. There is more than just a fictional story going on here. The author’s frenzied pace tells me I need to know something. She wants me to understand. When finished, I understood that with a story like this, I have no right to dictate how it should be written.
    By the author’s own admission, the story is fictional, but the events as a whole are not. They are things that the author has seen with her own eyes or heard about through others. Perhaps there is a little of the author’s own story mixed in. I don’t know. What I do know is that this book demands to be read. I have a clearer understanding of the Israeli/Palestinian struggles now. I’m not going to use this review to discuss politics – I’ll leave it up to you to take what you want from the book.
    Regardless of your own beliefs or opinions on the matter, you should not let this book pass you by.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 3, 2013

    This is one of those books that is difficult to put down. The ch

    This is one of those books that is difficult to put down. The characters face gargantuan (but very believable) challenges that push you out of your comfort zone and make you think twice about your blessings and your role as a human being.

    Best of all, while you experience the heartbreaks and joys of the main character, you lean a great deal about Israel and its situation in the Middle East--a situation largely possible due to US support. If "Gaza" and "West Bank" are just words you hear on the news, "The Almond Tree" will fill you in, making you a far more worldly and informed individual. You can even learn a little physics and math if you're up to it. (I was not--I enjoyed reading the short bits on those subjects, but I fear they did not make a dent in my brain.)

    If you love vivid characters, if you devour gripping drama, if you enjoy a peek at other cultures, if you are Jewish, if you are Arab, if you are American, if you care about people, or if you want to understand the world and your place in it, this book is a must-read. It will not only entertain you, it will make you a better informed person--likely even a better person. "The Almond Tree" is a lovely prayer for peace, though religion figures into the story as a political rather than a spiritual force.

    My only complaint about the book is that it had me sobbing often and unexpectedly--a problem as I read much of it on the treadmill at the gym and I detest weeping in public.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2013

    Not  just a book, it's also a series of important lessons in the

    Not  just a book, it's also a series of important lessons in the truth about the plight of the Palestinian people. Recommended to all. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2013

    I received this book on Monday and I must say from the first cha

    I received this book on Monday and I must say from the first chapter The Almond Tree gripped me. The life of Ichmad and his family is filled with sorrow, tragedy and fear that one cannot understand unless they are in that situation. The Almond Tree brings this to life. But most of all The Almond Tree breathes hope. What has impressed me the most is that Michelle Cohen Corasanti who is Jewish American has written this book so eloquently from the perspective of a Palestinian boy that I am blown away. This book is triumphant in the fact that it succeeds on showing us the other side of Middle East conflict. Nothing is ever black or white and Mrs. Corasanti proves it. I highly recommend this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    This was such an awesome book. It enlightened me to a few concep

    This was such an awesome book. It enlightened me to a few concepts I was unaware of and I have grown in my mind & heart because of it. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2013

    This is my first Goodreads give away book that I have won. It wa

    This is my first Goodreads give away book that I have won. It was delivered yesterday 12/31 and I read it today. A wonderful book that shows the point of view from the Palestines.

    What a great story told from the eyes of a 12 year old boy who encounters hatred simply because of where he was born.
    It is great reminder that sometimes those we hate we might come to respect and care for if we took time to get to know them. This book points out that those raised with hatred sometimes hate simply because they are raised to believe they have a right to hate.

    I recommend this book it is a great read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2013

    "The Almond Tree" is a really great book. It's not a b

    "The Almond Tree" is a really great book. It's not a book that I would pick to read by myself, but I won it on and I read it. 
    And I didn't regret it at all. Story is great, very inspiring and sad too. 
    Main character is Ichmad Hamid, story begins since he was a little kid.
    After his twelfth birthday everything changed. His father was imprisoned, his home was destroyed and his little sister died. They lived in fear every day because their village was on occupied land. He took his fathers place because he had to support his family. His life was really hard since then. He was just a kid but he had to work with his brother. A lot of ups and downs followed him. But he never gave up. His father supported him, his teacher too. He had someone who would tell him what to do, to make better life for himself and his family. He had support and chose right things to do.
    His story taught us to never give up. To do what we love, to fight for our dreams no matter how long it will take. Nothing is impossible.

    I recommend everyone to read this book, you won't regret it, I'm sure! :)

    P.S. Sorry for my bad English.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    The story follows Ichmad, a Palestinian boy, and his family. I i

    The story follows Ichmad, a Palestinian boy, and his family. I immediately felt an affinity with him right from the word go. I had never read a book from a Palestinian perspective before, but I'm so glad I read this. It's actually a quite brutal, heartbreaking read, but even so I would recommend it to anyone .Amazing book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2013

    The Almond Tree by Michelle Cohen Corasanti is a must read. This

    The Almond Tree by Michelle Cohen Corasanti is a must read. This is one of the books that is hard to put down. From crying at characters' deaths to feeling happy at Ichmad's accomplishments, this book has it all. I was shocked at how much I enjoyed this book. While the book's description interested me, I assumed that it would be a moderately enjoyable book, in which I would read over a few days. I was captivated from the beginning, so much so that I finished the book in two days because I couldn't force myself to put it down and had to see what was going to happen. I think that the Almond Tree is very well written and wonderfully displays ones struggles to gain peace and overcome prejudice. I feel that anyone of any age can truly enjoy this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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