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The American Century Cookbook: 100 Years of Culinary Invention
     

The American Century Cookbook: 100 Years of Culinary Invention

5.0 2
by Jean Anderson
 
For the past ten years, Jean Anderson has been on a quest: to search out the most popular recipes of the 20th century and to chronicle 100 years of culinary change in America. The result is a rich and fascinating look at where we've been, at the recipes our mothers and grandmothers loved, and at how our own tastes have evolved.

The more than 500 cherished

Overview

For the past ten years, Jean Anderson has been on a quest: to search out the most popular recipes of the 20th century and to chronicle 100 years of culinary change in America. The result is a rich and fascinating look at where we've been, at the recipes our mothers and grandmothers loved, and at how our own tastes have evolved.

The more than 500 cherished recipes in these pages are mainstays of American home cooking, the recipes that have remained favorites year after year. For the smallest sampling:

California dip . . . Buffalo chicken wings . . . vichyssoise . . . tuna-noodle casserole . . . Swiss steak . . . frosted meat loaf . . . tamale pie . . . corn dogs . . . lobster rolls . . . classic green bean bake . . . perfection salad . . . green goddess salad . . . frozen fruit salad . . . chiffon cake . . . brownies . . . chocolate chip cookies . . . chocolate decadence

Beyond this collection is Jean's exploration of the diversity of our nation's cuisine and our adoption of such "foreign" dishes as pizza, gazpacho, lasagne, moussaka, and tarte tatin. Her painstakingly researched text includes extensive headnotes, thumbnail profiles of important people and products (from Fannie Farmer to James Beard and from electric refrigerators to the microwave), and a timeline of major 20th-century food firsts.

In recording popular recipes that might have been lost, in setting them in richly detailed historical context, Jean Anderson has written her masterwork. The American Century Cookbook may well be the most important new cookbook of the decade; it is certainly the book America will love.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
The American Century Cookbook is a wonderful gift to American cooks by the much-honored food writer, Jean Anderson. As we venture forth into a new century, this is a book to take along to remind us of the kitchens we have come from. For the history it recounts, it is worth the investment, to say nothing of the hundreds of classic recipes.
Library Journal
Anderson, a well-known food writer and cookbook author, has put together a fascinating collection of recipes, anecdotes, and historical tidbits about America's favorite foods since the turn of the century. Many recipes come from old cookbooks and magazines; others are from chefs and cooking teachers; and lots come from the test kitchens of food companies (remember Mock Apple Pie from Ritz crackers?). Most readers will discover forgotten old favorites here, although at times the preponderance of back-of-the-box-type recipes is a rueful comment on American tastes but, then, how could Lipton's onion soup dip not be included? Recipes are organized by category, but the headnotes and a time line running through the book set them in historical context. There are also boxes on topics from Wheaties to the Joy of Cooking and 300 illustrations (not seen) scattered throughout. Fun to read or just to dip into, this is a unique cultural history; highly recommended.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517705766
Publisher:
Random House, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/10/1997
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
547
Product dimensions:
7.67(w) x 9.45(h) x 1.77(d)

Read an Excerpt

A Recipe from The American Century Cookbook

Stroganoff Casserole
Makes 6 to 8 Servings

A 70s/'80s party pleaser that I dug out of my personal recipe file.
1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef chuck
1 large yellow onion, peeled and coarsely chopped
1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
1/4 teaspoon dried leaf thyme, crumbled
1/2teaspoon dried leaf marjorama, crumbled
1 (8 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 cup cream-style cottage cheese
1/2 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, diced
1/2 pound medium egg noodles, cooked and drained by package directions
1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper (or to taste)
1/2 cup coarsely shredded sharp Cheddar cheese

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degreesF. Coat 2 1/2 to 3 quart casserole with nonstick cooking spray and set aside.
  2. Stir-fry beef, onion, and garlic in a very large heavy nonstick skillet over moderate heat, breaking up clumps, until meat is uniformly brown, about 5 minutes. Stir in marjoram and thyme to cook, stirring often, 3 to 4 minutes.
  3. Mix in tomato sauce, cottage cheese, cream cheese, noodles, salt, and pepper. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust as needed.
  4. Turn into the casserole, scatter Cheddar evenly on top, and bake, uncovered, until browned and bubbly, 25 to 30 minutes.

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The American Century Cookbook: 100 Years of Culinary Invention 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a gem in my cookbook collection. In this book you will find things like the history of the Reuben sandwich (pg.342), a recipe for Coca Cola salad (pg. 291) and sort of a food history 'time-line' through out the book. A great source for finding classic recipes that have shaped the American dinner plate. If you buy only one cookbook this year - it should be this one! I even look through it while my husband watches television.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This cookbook has old 'tried and true' recipes such as Lady Baltimore Cake and Millian-Dollar Macadamia Fudge Torte. Along with recipes on everything from snacks, soups, casseroles, main dished, salads, desserts and more, and stories about these recipes. The American Century Cookbook is more like a history of the making of food in America throughout the last 100 years. For example, stories of Kentucky Fried Chicken, M & Ms', Birdseye frozen foods and more. There are timelines of events, for example 1978 Food & Wine magazine debuts or 1932 corn chips appear. There is only one drawback, with all of the wonderful historic photos throughout the book there are no captions -- that would have added greatly to the books' flavor. However, this is one great cookbook worth having.