The American Journey: Volume 2 / Edition 7

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Overview

Frames American history through personal and collective journeys

Offering a blend of political and social histories, The American Journey shows that our attempt to live up to our American ideals is an ongoing journey—one that has become increasingly more inclusive of different groups and ideas. With a goal of making American history accessible, the authors offer a strong, clear narrative and provide students with the tools they need to understand history.

MyHistoryLab is an integral part of the Goldfield program. Key learning applications include assessment, MyHistoryLab Video Series, and History Explorer.

A better teaching and learning experience
This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience—for you and your students. Here’s how:

  • Personalize Learning – MyHistoryLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program. It helps students prepare for class and instructor gauge individual and class performance.
  • Emphasize Outcomes – Learning Objective Questions at the beginning of each chapter and a chapter review and thematic timeline ending each chapter keep students focused on what they need to know. On MyHistoryLab, practice tests help students achieve these objectives by measuring progress and creating personalized study plans.
  • Engage Students – A new pedagogically-driven design highlights a clear learning path through the material and offers a visually stunning learning experience in print or on a screen. With the Pearson eText, students can transition directly to MyHistoryLab resources such as primary source documents, videos, and mapping exercises.
  • Improve Critical Thinking – Powerful learning applications in MyHistoryLab—including Explorer mapping exercises, Closer Look analyses of sources and topics, and Writing Assessments tied to engaging videos—promote critical thinking.
  • Support Instructors – MyHistoryLab, Instructor’s eText, MyHistoryLab Instructor’s Guide, Class Preparation Tool, Instructor’s Manual, MyTest, and PowerPoints are available.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205960958
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 7/10/2013
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 176,962
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

David Goldfield received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Maryland. Since 1982 he has been Robert Lee Bailey Professor of History at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte. He is the author or editor of thirteen books on various aspects of southern and urban history. Two of his works–Cotton Fields and Skyscrapers: Southern City and Region, 1607-1980 (1982) and Black, White, and Southern: Race Relations and Southern Culture, 1940 to the Present (1990)–received the Mayflower Award for nonfiction and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in history. His most recent book is Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History (2002). When he is not writing history, Dr. Goldfield applies his historical craft to history museum exhibits, voting rights cases, and local planning and policy issues.

Carl Abbott is a professor of Urban Studies and planning at Portland State University. He taught previously in the history departments at the University of Denver and Old Dominion University, and held visiting appointments at Mesa College in Colorado and George Washington University. He holds degrees in history from Swarthmore College and the University of Chicago. He specializes in the history of cities and the American West and serves as co-editor of the Pacific Historical Review. His books include The New Urban America: Growth and Politics in Sunbelt Cities (1981, 1987), The Metropolitan Frontier: Cities in the Modern American West (1993), Planning a New West: The Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area (1997), and Political Terrain: Washington, D.C. from Tidewater Town to Global Metropolis (1999). He is currently working on a comprehensive history of the role of urbanization and urban culture in the history of western North America.

Virginia DeJohn Anderson is Associate Professor of History at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She received her B.A. from the University of Connecticut. As the recipient of a Marshall Scholarship, she earned an M.A. degree at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England. Returning to the United States, she received her A.M. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. She is the author of New England’s Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century (1991) and several articles on colonial history, which have appeared in such journals as the William and Mary Quarterly and the New England Quarterly. She is currently finishing a book entitled Creatures of Empire: People and Animals in Early America.

Jo Ann E. Argersinger received her Ph.D. from George Washington University and is Professor of History at Southern Illinois University. A recipient of fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, she is a historian of social, labor, and business policy. Her publications include Toward a New Deal in Baltimore: People and Government in the Great Depression (1988) and Making the Amalgamated: Gender, Ethnicity, and Class in the Baltimore Clothing Industry (1999).

Peter H. Argersinger received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin and is Professor of History at Southern Illinois University. He has won several fellowships as well as the Binkley-Stephenson Award from the Organization of American Historians. Among his books on American political and rural history are Populism and Politics (1974), Structure, Process, and Party (1992), and The Limits of Agrarian Radicalism (1995). His current research focuses on the political crisis of the 1890s.

William L. Barney is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A native of Pennsylvania, he received his B.A. from Cornell University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. He has published extensively on nineteenth century U.S. history and has a particular interest in the Old South and the coming of the Civil War. Among his publications are The Road to Secession (1972), The Secessionist Impulse (1974), Flawed Victory (1975), The Passage of the Republic (1987), and Battleground for the Union (1989). He is currently finishing an edited collection of essays on nineteenth-century America and a book on the Civil War. Most recently, he has edited A Companion to 19th-Century America (2001) and finished The Civil War and Reconstruction: A Student Companion (2001).

Robert M. Weir is Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus at the University of South Carolina. He received his B.A. from Pennsylvania State University and his Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University. He has taught at the University of Houston and, as a visiting professor, at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom. His articles have won prizes from the Southeastern Society for the Study of the Eighteenth Century and the William and Mary Quarterly. Among his publications are Colonial South Carolina: A History, “The Last of American Freemen”: Studies in the Political Culture of the Colonial and Revolutionary South, and, more recently, a chapter on the Carolinas in the new Oxford History of the British Empire (1998).

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Table of Contents

Chapter 16: Reconstruction, 1865–1877
Chapter 17: A New South: Economic Progress and Social Tradition, 1877–1900
Chapter 18: Industry, Immigrants, and Cities, 1870–1900
Chapter 19: Transforming the West, 1865–1890
Chapter 20: Politics and Government, 1877–1900
Chapter 21: The Progressive Era, 1900–1917
Chapter 22: Creating an Empire, 1865–1917
Chapter 23: America and the Great War, 1914–1920
Chapter 24: Toward a Modern America: The 1920s
Chapter 25: The Great Depre ssion and the New Dea l, 1929–1939
Chapter 26: World War II, 1939–1945
Chapter 27: The Cold War at Home and Abroad, 1946–1952
Chapter 28: The Confident Years, 1953–1964
Chapter 29: Shaken to the Roots, 1965–1980
Chapter 30: The Reagan Revolution and a Changing World, 1981–1992
Chapter 31: Complacency, Crisis, and Global Reengagement, 1993–2012
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