The American Leonardo: A Tale of Obsession, Art and Money [NOOK Book]

Overview

In 1919 a returning World War I veteran named Harry Hahn and his French bride attempted to sell what they thought was a painting by Leonardo Da Vinci in New York. Renowned art dealer Sir Joseph Duveen declared the picture-La Belle Ferronniere-a fake without ever seeing the canvas. The Hahns sued Duveen for slander, setting off a legal battle that would last for decades.
In The American Leonardo, John Brewer traces the twisting path of the Hahn La Belle-a painting of famously ...
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The American Leonardo: A Tale of Obsession, Art and Money

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Overview

In 1919 a returning World War I veteran named Harry Hahn and his French bride attempted to sell what they thought was a painting by Leonardo Da Vinci in New York. Renowned art dealer Sir Joseph Duveen declared the picture-La Belle Ferronniere-a fake without ever seeing the canvas. The Hahns sued Duveen for slander, setting off a legal battle that would last for decades.
In The American Leonardo, John Brewer traces the twisting path of the Hahn La Belle-a painting of famously uncertain origin--as he illuminates the workings of the twentieth-century art market, exploring such larger questions about the art world such as how attributions are made, how they affect both the status and value of artworks, and how the entire system of art dealers, curators, and connoisseurs authenticates works of art. In the early twentieth century new methods of scientific analysis developed, which meant that for the first time, the critical eye of the connoisseur had to contend with an emerging array of scientific and forensic tests that (however crude at their inception) promised a degree of objectivity and reliability unattainable before.
Brewer shows how the tension between the two methods of attribution lay at the heart of the Hahn La Belle dispute, which continues to this day. The painting currently languishes in an Omaha storage vault awaiting the resolution of the most recent lawsuit.
For artists and art-lovers, collectors and curators--and for anyone who's ever stood in front of a painting and wondered about its story--The American Leonardo offers a discerning and entertaining view into the art world.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
At first, the tale seems rather ordinary: in 1920, Andrée and Harry Hahn offer for sale a painting, La Belle Ferronnière, that they claim is by Leonardo da Vinci. An art dealer questions the painting's authenticity—and the couple sues. In the courtroom, the circus begins, with the usual one-upmanship of experts, cross-examinations and baffled jurors. In two other circus rings are the broader art market and the world of schemers, fakes and the truth about the painting itself. Brewer, a professor of humanities and social sciences at the California Institute of Technology, is a fine ringmaster. He paints thorough pictures of each player—the ambitious Midwesterner Harry Hahn; the rarified and aggressive art dealer Sir Joseph Duveen; and the numerous representatives who took on the challenge of selling a “tainted” painting: “A large, hectoring man who was also capable of great charm, [Leon] Loucks... told his friends that he was an illegitimate child who had been abandoned by his shame-faced mother who 'sold' him to a medical research facility....” Is La Belle Ferronnière a Leonardo? That mystery drives the book forward, but also delivers a satisfying twist: why do we care? 12 b&w illus. (Oct.)
Library Journal
British historian Brewer's (humanities & social sciences, California Inst. of Technology; The Pleasures of the Imagination: English Culture in the Eighteenth Century) fast-paced work details the controversy surrounding a single painting brought to America after World War I—a painting whose owners, Harry and Andrée Hahn, insisted was Leonardo da Vinci's La belle ferronnière. Art dealer Sir Joseph Duveen claimed the painting was not an original, and a high-drama lawsuit ensued. As the authenticity of art and authorial veracity are now frequently discussed, Brewer shows that controversy and fine art have been inseparable for at least the last 100 years. He presents an important conversation about what gives art value, what art might consist of, and what makes any work of art authentic. VERDICT It is a rare treat when a nonfiction work reads like a thriller or a well-designed mystery, with suspense and wit on every page. Lovers of art, students of history, and anyone who appreciates an engaging historical tale will enjoy this brilliantly written and thoroughly researched book.—Herbert E. Shapiro, Empire State Coll. of SUNY, Rochester
From the Publisher
"Brewer is a fine ringmaster.... He paints thorough pictures of each player."—Publishers Weekly

"A fascinating book...a gripping fable of the never-ending conflict between art and money."—The Mail on Sunday

"Excellent... has the unmistakable vibrancy of original research."—The Sunday Times

"Wholly engaging ... he rests an ambitious enquiry on a brisk, absorbing story. His book is a huge risk, and a triumph."—The Scotsman

Praise for Pleasures of the Imagination:

"Like all really original achievements, it makes us sharply rethink things we supposed we knew well."—Simon Schama

"Brewer takes us on a grand tour of the exciting, fluid, often raucous world of the 18th-century arts. . . . A brilliantly illustrated social history."—New York Times Book Review

"A magnificent achievement. . . . Enormous in its scope, astute in its choices of examples, learned in its resources, but written with an almost unfailing lucidity and accessibility."—New Republic

"Immensely rich and vividly and eloquently conveyed."—Los Angeles Times Sunday Book Review

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199745791
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 9/2/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

John Brewer is Eli and Eyde Broad Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences at California Institute of Technology and the author of many books, including Pleasures of the Imagination.
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