The American Manufactory: Art, Labor, and the World of Things in the Early Republic

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$44.60
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.95
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 88%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (26) from $5.95   
  • New (15) from $11.94   
  • Used (11) from $5.95   

Overview

This cultural history of American federalism argues that nation-building cannot be understood apart from the process of industrialization and the making of the working class in the late-eighteenth-century United States. Citing the coincidental rise of federalism and industrialism, Laura Rigal examines the creations and performances of writers, collectors, engineers, inventors, and illustrators who assembled an early national "world of things," at a time when American craftsmen were transformed into wage laborers and production was rationalized, mechanized, and put to new ideological purposes. American federalism emerges here as a culture of self-making, in forms as various as street parades, magazine writing, painting, autobiography, advertisement, natural history collections, and trials and trial transcripts.

Chapters center on the craftsmen who celebrated the Constitution by marching in Philadelphia's Grand Federal Procession of 1788; the autobiographical writings of John Fitch, an inventor of the steamboat before Fulton; the exhumation and museum display of the "first American mastodon" by the Peale family of Philadelphia; Joseph Dennie's literary miscellany, the Port Folio; the nine-volume American Ornithology of Alexander Wilson; and finally the autobiography and portrait of Philadelphia locksmith Pat Lyon, who was falsely imprisoned for bank robbery in 1798 but eventually emerged as an icon for the American working man. Rigal demonstrates that federalism is not merely a political movement, or an artifact of language, but a phenomenon of culture: one among many innovations elaborated in the "manufactory" of early American nation-building.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

American Historical Review
An astute analysis. . . . Rigal has written an important book that raises important questions. This alone makes it essential reading for those interested in deepening our understanding of early national culture.
— Ronald Schultz
Journal of the Early Republic
A meticulous, sophisticated, and varied tableau.
— Andrew M. Schocket
William and Mary Quarterly
A fascinating and complex mix of provocative readings of the early nation's cultural productions.
— Ellen Fernandez-Sacco
Reviews in American History
Rigal has written an innovative and highly suggestive book. . . . [Her] analyses are immensely interesting and largely persuasive.
— Stephen P. Rice
American Historical Review - Ronald Schultz
An astute analysis. . . . Rigal has written an important book that raises important questions. This alone makes it essential reading for those interested in deepening our understanding of early national culture.
Journal of the Early Republic - Andrew M. Schocket
A meticulous, sophisticated, and varied tableau.
William and Mary Quarterly - Ellen Fernandez-Sacco
A fascinating and complex mix of provocative readings of the early nation's cultural productions.
Reviews in American History - Stephen P. Rice
Rigal has written an innovative and highly suggestive book. . . . [Her] analyses are immensely interesting and largely persuasive.
From the Publisher
"An astute analysis. . . . Rigal has written an important book that raises important questions. This alone makes it essential reading for those interested in deepening our understanding of early national culture."—Ronald Schultz, American Historical Review

"A meticulous, sophisticated, and varied tableau."—Andrew M. Schocket, Journal of the Early Republic

"A fascinating and complex mix of provocative readings of the early nation's cultural productions."—Ellen Fernandez-Sacco, William and Mary Quarterly

"Rigal has written an innovative and highly suggestive book. . . . [Her] analyses are immensely interesting and largely persuasive."—Stephen P. Rice, Reviews in American History

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691089515
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 9/4/2001
  • Edition description: REPRINT
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.28 (w) x 9.34 (h) x 0.66 (d)

Table of Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INTRODUCTION The Extended Republic in the Age of Manufactures
PART I: FEDERAL MECHANICS
CHAPTER ONE Raising the Roof: Authors,
Architects, and Artisans in the Grand Federal
Procession of
CHAPTER TWO The Mechanic as the Author of
His Life: John Fitch's "Life" and "Steamboat History"
PART II: THE MAMMOTH STATE
CHAPTER THREE Peale's Mammoth
CHAPTER FOUR The American Lounger: Figures of Failure and Fatigue in the Port Folio,

PART III: THE STRONG BOX
CHAPTER FIVE Feathered Federalism: Alexander Wilson's American Ornithology,

CHAPTER SIX Picture-Nation: Pat Lyon at the
Forge,
NOTES
INDEX

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)