The American Protest Essay and National Belonging: Addressing Division

The American Protest Essay and National Belonging: Addressing Division

by Brian Norman
     
 

The American Protest Essay and National Belonging uncovers a rich tradition of essays by writers who also serve as spokespersons for American social movements throughout the nation’s history. Brian Norman demonstrates that the American protest essay is a distinct form that draws from both the European-born personal essay and American political oratory anchored… See more details below

Overview

The American Protest Essay and National Belonging uncovers a rich tradition of essays by writers who also serve as spokespersons for American social movements throughout the nation’s history. Brian Norman demonstrates that the American protest essay is a distinct form that draws from both the European-born personal essay and American political oratory anchored in social movements. He places celebrated twentieth-century writers like James Baldwin, Vine Deloria Jr., W. E. B. Du Bois, Emma Goldman, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, Thomas Pynchon, Adrienne Rich, Gore Vidal, Alice Walker, and Richard Wright among many others in a tradition dating back to the nation’s founding. Drawing on feminist and multicultural studies and movements, Norman explains how the protest essay brings particular experiences of exclusion into direct conversation with beliefs in universal equality to offer a story of national belonging that is able to address, rather than repress, division.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780791472361
Publisher:
State University of New York Press
Publication date:
10/04/2007
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments

Introduction

Concerning Division: Allegiance, Renunciation, and National Belonging

1. Toward an American Protest Essay Tradition

2. New Declarations of Independence: Three Feminist Re-visions of a Founding Document

3. The Addressed and the Redressed: Helen Hunt Jackson’s Protest Essay and the Protest Novel Tradition

4. The Art of Political Advocacy: James Baldwin, American Protest Essayist

5. Identity Politics, Collective Futures, and the Cross-Essay Conversations of Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Alice Walker

6. June Jordan and Transnational American Protest

Conclusion
Why the Essay?

Appendix
Printings of the Combahee River Collective, A Black Feminist Statement (April 1977)

Notes
Bibliography
Index

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