The American School, A Global Context: From the Puritans to the Obama Administration / Edition 8

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Overview

The American School, A Global Context: From the Puritans to the Obama Administration by Joel Spring focuses on the process of educational globalization and the development of American schools in a global context.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780078097843
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education
  • Publication date: 6/21/2010
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 8
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 746,852
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Joel Spring received his Ph.D. in educational policy studies from the University of Wisconsin. He is currently a Professor at Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His great-great-grandfather was the first Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory and his grandfather, Joel S. Spring, was a local district chief at the time Indian Territory became Oklahoma. He currently teaches at Queens College of the City University of New York.

His major research interests are history of education, multicultural education, Native American culture, the politics of education, global education, and human rights education. He is the author of over twenty books and the most recent are How Educational Ideologies are Shaping Global Society; Education and the Rise of the Global Economy; The Universal Right to Education: Justification, Definition, and Guidelines; Globalization and Educational Rights; and Educating the Consumer Citizen: A History of the Marriage of Schools, Advertising, and Media.

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Table of Contents

List of Time Lines  

Preface  
Chapter 1 Thinking Critically about History

Interpreting School History: From the Right to the Left

Purposes of Educational History and its Effect on Public Images and Emotions Regarding Schools

Themes in American Educational History

Globalization Framework

The Effect of Cultural and Religious Differences on Schools

Schools as Managers of Public Thought

Racial and Ethnic Conflict as a Theme in School History

The Role in Educational History of Equality of Opportunity and Human Capital

Globalization: Consumer and Environmental Education
Chapter 2 Religion and Authority in Colonial Education 

Education and Culture in Colonial Society 

The Role of Education in Colonial Society  

Historical Interpretations of Colonial Education

Authority and Social Status in Colonial Education

Colonialism and Educational Policy  

Language and Cultural Domination  

Native Americans: Education as Cultural Imperialism  

Enslaved Africans: Atlantic Creoles  

Enslaved Africans: The Plantation System  

The Idea of Secular Education: Freedom of Thought and the Establishment of Academies  

Benjamin Franklin and Education as Social Mobility  

The Family and the Child  

Conclusion  
Chapter 3 Nationalism, Multiculturalism, and Moral Reform in the New Republic  

World Culture Theorists

The Problem of Cultural Diversity

Noah Webster: Nationalism and the Creation of a Dominant Culture 

Thomas Jefferson: A Natural Aristocracy  

Moral Reform and Faculty Psychology  

Concepts of Childhood: Protected, Working, Poor, Rural, and Enslaved

Charity Schools, the Lancasterian System, and Prisons  

Institutional Change and the American College  

Public versus Private Schools  

Conclusion: Continuing Issues in American Education  
Chapter 4 The Ideology and Politics of the Common School  

Three Distinctive Features of the Common School Movement  

Workingmen and the Struggle for a Republican Education  

How Much Government Involvement in Schools? The Whigs and the Democrats

The Birth of the High School

The Continuing Debate about the Common School Ideal  

Conclusion  
Chapter 5 The Common School and the Threat of Cultural Pluralism  

The Increasing Multicultural Population of the United States  

Irish Catholics: A Threat to Anglo-American Schools and Culture  

Slavery and Freedom in the North: African Americans and Schools in the New Republic  

Native Americans  

Conclusion  
Chapter 6 Organizing the American School: Teachers and Bureaucracy

The American Teacher  

Revolution in Teaching Methods: Object Learning  

The Evolution of Bureaucracy: A Global Model

McGuffey's Readers and the Spirit of Capitalism  

Conclusion  
Chapter 7 Multiculturalism and the Failure of the Common School Ideal  

Mexican Americans: Race and Citizenship  

Asian Americans: Exclusion and Segregation  

Native American Citizenship  

Citizenship for African Americans  

Issues Regarding Puerto Rican Citizenship  

Puerto Rican American Educational Issues  

Conclusion: Setting the Stage for the Great Civil Rights Movement  
Chapter 8 Global Migration and the Growth of the Welfare Function of Schools

Immigration from Southern and Eastern Europe  

The Kindergarten Movement  

Home Economics: Education of the New Consumer Woman  

School Cafeterias, the American Cuisine, and Processed Foods  

The Play Movement  

Summer School  

Social Centers  

The New Culture Wars  

Resisting Segregation: African Americans  

The Second Crusade for Black Education  

Resisting Segregation: Mexican Americans  

Native American Boarding Schools  

Resisting Discrimination: Asian Americans  

Educational Resistance in Puerto Rico  

Conclusion: Public Schooling As America's Welfare Institution  
Chapter 9 Human Capital: High School, Junior High School, and Vocational Guidance and Education  

The High School  

The High School and Adolescent Psychology

The Comprehensive High School and the Cardinal Principles of Secondary Education

High School Social Life: Cheerleaders and Assemblies

Vocational Education

Vocational Guidance

Junior High School  

Adapting the Classroom to the Workplace: Lesson Plans

Adapting the Classroom to the Workplace: Progressivism

Adapting the Classroom to the Workplace: Stimulus-Response

Classroom Management as Preparation for Factory Life

Historical Interpretations: Public Benefit or Corporate Greed?  

Conclusion: The Meaning of Equality of Opportunity  
Chapter 10 Scientific School Management: Testing, Immigrants and Experts

Scientifically Managed Schools: Meritocracy and Reducing Public Control  

Professionalizing Educational Administration Measurement, Democracy, and the Superiority of Anglo-Americans  

Closing the Door to Immigrants: The 1924 Immigration Act  

"Backward" Children and Special Classrooms  

Eugenics and the Age of Sterilization  

The University and Meritocracy  

Conclusion  
Chapter 11 The Politics of Knowledge: Teachers' Unions, the American Legion, and the American Way  

Teachers versus Administrators: The American Federation of Teachers  

The Rise of the National Education Association  

The Political Changes of the Depression Years  

The Politics of Ideological Management: The American Legion  

Selling the "American Way" in Schools and on Billboards  

Conclusion  
Chapter 12 Schools, Media, and Popular Culture: Influencing the Minds of Children and Teenagers  

Censorship of Movies as a Form of Public Education

Educators and the Movies  

Should Commercial Radio or Educators Determine National Culture?  

Creating the Super Hero for Children's Radio  

Controlling the Influence of Comic Books  

Educating Children as Consumers  

The Creation of Teenage Markets  

Children and Youth from the 1950s to the 21st Century  

Conclusion  
Chapter 13 American Schools and Global Politics: The Cold War and Poverty

Youth Unemployment: Universal Military Service and the GI Bill

National Science Foundation and Science Instruction

Universal Military Training and the Channeling of Youth for Global Warfare

The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and the Educational Testing Service

The Cold War and Purging the Schools of Communists

American Schools: Weakest Link to Global Victory?

Global Imperatives: The National Defense Education Act  

Schools and The War on Poverty

Head Start and the Origins of No Child Left Behind   

Sesame Street and Educational Television 

Conclusion  
Chapter 14 The Fruits of Globalization: Civil Rights, Global Migration and Multicultural Education

Ending School Segregation of National Minorities

The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  

Native Americans and Indigenous Educational Rights  

Asian Americans: Educating the "Model Minority"

Hispanic/Latino Americans  

Bilingual Education: The Culture Wars Continued  

The Immigration Act of 1965 and the New American Population  

Multicultural Education, Immigration, and the Culture Wars  

Schools and the International Women's Movement  

Children with Special Needs  

The Coloring of Textbook Town  

Liberating the Textbook Town Housewife for More Consumption  

Conclusion: The Cold War and Civil Rights  
Chapter 15 Globalizing the American School: From Nixon to Obama

School Prayer and Bible Reading

Nixon Years: Career Education and Busing

Accountability and Standardized Testing  

Global Educational Goals: National Standards, Choice, and Savage Inequalities  

Educating for the Consumer Economy

Education for Global Work and Consumption: No Child Left Behind

No Child Left Behind and Religious Conservatives

The 2008 Election: Global Economy and Cultural Divide

Global Crisis and the Demise of Environmental Education

Conclusion: From Horace Mann to Barack Obama  

Index  
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