The Anasazi by Eleanor H. Ayer, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Anasazi

The Anasazi

by Eleanor H. Ayer, Elenor H. Ayer
     
 

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"The amount of information (Ayer) offers about the Anasazi's origins, life-style, history, dissolution, and descendants is impressive". -- BL. "A welcome addition to a Native American collection". -- NYHS. AAAS, KR, SLJ. 1993.

Overview

"The amount of information (Ayer) offers about the Anasazi's origins, life-style, history, dissolution, and descendants is impressive". -- BL. "A welcome addition to a Native American collection". -- NYHS. AAAS, KR, SLJ. 1993.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-Ayer covers the development and dispersement of the Anasazi civilization in a workmanlike manner, from the prehistoric Basket Makers to the historic Pueblo peoples. She describes the methods used by archaeologists to unearth physical evidence of the Anasazi culture and how such relics can lead to theories about the practices of a long-gone population. The book is at its best in describing development in architecture and artifacts, and the progression of technology. On the looser ground of daily living or religious rituals, the author occasionally slips from the possible to the probable (e.g., ``The Anasazi seem to have had great respect for nature''). Also, inferring backwards from modern Pueblo to the Anasazi is tempting, but not necessarily accurate. A roster of Anasazi and Pueblo sites to visit is included. A smattering of small black-and-white photos provides scant decoration. This title will be useful to practitioners of whole language, and those studying the beginnings of Native American culture. Scott Warren's briefer Cities in the Sand (Chronicle, 1991) covers some of the same information. Caroline Arnold's The Ancient Cliff Dwellers of Mesa Verde (Clarion, 1992) is more limited and aimed at a much younger audience, and David Petersen's The Anasazi (Childrens, 1991) is briefer still.-Patricia Manning, Eastchester Public Library, NY
Ilene Cooper
Ayer takes an in-depth look at the Anasazi, predecessors to the Pueblo Indians, who came to this country approximately 2,000 years ago. Basket makers, pottery makers, and cliff dwellers, the Anasazi, and their impressive culture, should make for exciting reading, but the text is on the dry side. What it lacks in quality, however, is made up in quantity, and the amount of information she offers about the Anasazi's origins, life-style, history, dissolution, and descendants is impressive. A final chapter gives information about the pueblos and reservations where such descendants as the Zuni and the Hopi live, and the national parks, monuments, and heritage centers where Anasazi ruins and artifacts are on display. To be illustrated with photographs.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802781840
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Publication date:
12/28/1992
Pages:
136
Product dimensions:
6.36(w) x 9.51(h) x 0.71(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

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