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The Anthropology Of News & Journalism
     

The Anthropology Of News & Journalism

by S. Elizabeth Bird
 

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The Anthropology of News and Journalism is the first book to explore the role of news and journalism in contemporary culture from an anthropological perspective—as a form of cultural meaning-making in its creation, content, and dissemination. Anthropology's global, comparative perspective and ethnographic methods provide powerful insights for analyzing case

Overview

The Anthropology of News and Journalism is the first book to explore the role of news and journalism in contemporary culture from an anthropological perspective—as a form of cultural meaning-making in its creation, content, and dissemination. Anthropology's global, comparative perspective and ethnographic methods provide powerful insights for analyzing case studies from around the world. Essays by leading scholars explore communities of professional and nonprofessional journalists. They describe news-making processes ranging from the local to the global digital environment, as well as how news is disseminated and received in a variety of cultural settings.

Contributors are S. Elizabeth Bird, Amahl Bishara, Dominic C. Boyer, Dorle Dracklé, Zeynep Devrim Gürsel, Jennifer Hasty, Joseph C. Manzella, Kerry McCallum, Mark Pedelty, Mark Allen Peterson, Ursula Rao, Adrienne Russell, Christina Schwenkel, Jonathan Skinner, Debra Spitulnik, Maria D. Vesperi, Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, and Leon I. Yacher.

Editorial Reviews

Media International Australia
"[Provides] an array of insights and challenging questions that will be of interest to anyone keen to move on from the traditional assumption that news is simply news." —Lawrie Zion, Media Studies, La Trobe University, Media International Australia, Issue 135, May 2010.

— Lawrie Zion, Media Studies, La Trobe University

Choice

"Provide[s] fascinating insights into the variations and continuities of news as social process in distinct cultural contexts.... Highly recommended." —Choice

Anthropos

"A much-needed contribution to the anthropology of mass media, S. Elizabeth Bird's edited book on news and journalism can be read as an extremely productive reevaluation of not just anthropology's contribution to the study of news, but mass media in general." —Anthropos, 106.2011

Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies
"[T]he book offers fresh perspectives on the topic of the anthropology of news and journalism and it does so in a way that is both scholarly and accessible." —Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

"[T]his volume will remain a key work of reference in the field for many years to come. It greatly enriches the media anthropological corpus and offers a range of case studies and conceptual tools that students and scholars in the anthropology of media and neighbouring fields will want to apply and develop in new contexts." —Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

Barbie Zelizer

"A thoughtful, persuasive, necessary, and long overdue tracking of the intersection connecting journalism and anthropology." —Barbie Zelizer, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania

Michael Evans

"Extends the dialogue between anthropology and journalism into fruitful realms, focusing as it does on news in particular, rather than broader issues involving the mass media." —Michael Evans, School of Journalism, Indiana University

Media International Australia - Lawrie Zion

"[Provides] an array of insights and challenging questions that will be of interest to anyone keen to move on from the traditional assumption that news is simply news." —Lawrie Zion, Media Studies, La Trobe University, Media International Australia, Issue 135, May 2010.

A. Arno

In her introduction to this valuable collection of 16 original chapters, editor Bird (Univ. of South Florida) makes a strong case for the study of news and journalism as an important new arena of anthropological scholarship. One indication of the contemporary centrality of news and journalism to the production of social reality and cultural meaning is the convergence of academic disciplines--prominently including communication studies, British cultural studies, political science, and academic journalism itself--around the topic. Bird argues that anthropology can make a significant contribution to this interdisciplinary mix through its refined and rigorous ethnographic methods and its comparative cultural perspective. The individual chapters, authored by leading figures in media anthropology and media studies, strongly reinforce that claim. They also demonstrate that the gains are reciprocal. Combining anthropological perspectives and methods with those more central to other disciplines, such as survey research and formal content analysis, extends the scope of media anthropology. The chapters represent studies from Australia, India, Palestine, Portugal, Venezuela, Vietnam, Ghana, Zambia, Montserrat, and the US, and provide fascinating insights into the variations and continuities of news as social process in distinct cultural contexts. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. -- ChoiceA. Arno, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, September 2010

Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies

"[T]he book offers fresh perspectives on the topic of the anthropology of news and journalism and it does so in a way that is both scholarly and accessible." —Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies

From the Publisher
"[T]his volume will remain a key work of reference in the field for many years to come. It greatly enriches the media anthropological corpus and offers a range of case studies and conceptual tools that students and scholars in the anthropology of media and neighbouring fields will want to apply and develop in new contexts." —Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

"[Provides] an array of insights and challenging questions that will be of interest to anyone keen to move on from the traditional assumption that news is simply news." —Lawrie Zion, Media Studies, La Trobe University, Media International Australia, Issue 135, May 2010.

"Provide[s] fascinating insights into the variations and continuities of news as social process in distinct cultural contexts.... Highly recommended." —Choice

In her introduction to this valuable collection of 16 original chapters, editor Bird (Univ. of South Florida) makes a strong case for the study of news and journalism as an important new arena of anthropological scholarship. One indication of the contemporary centrality of news and journalism to the production of social reality and cultural meaning is the convergence of academic disciplines—prominently including communication studies, British cultural studies, political science, and academic journalism itself—around the topic. Bird argues that anthropology can make a significant contribution to this interdisciplinary mix through its refined and rigorous ethnographic methods and its comparative cultural perspective. The individual chapters, authored by leading figures in media anthropology and media studies, strongly reinforce that claim. They also demonstrate that the gains are reciprocal. Combining anthropological perspectives and methods with those more central to other disciplines, such as survey research and formal content analysis, extends the scope of media anthropology. The chapters represent studies from Australia, India, Palestine, Portugal, Venezuela, Vietnam, Ghana, Zambia, Montserrat, and the US, and provide fascinating insights into the variations and continuities of news as social process in distinct cultural contexts. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. — ChoiceA. Arno, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, September 2010

"Extends the dialogue between anthropology and journalism into fruitful realms, focusing as it does on news in particular, rather than broader issues involving the mass media." —Michael Evans, School of Journalism, Indiana University

"A much-needed contribution to the anthropology of mass media, S. Elizabeth Bird's edited book on news and journalism can be read as an extremely productive reevaluation of not just anthropology's contribution to the study of news, but mass media in general." —Anthropos, 106.2011

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780253221261
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
Publication date:
11/01/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
344
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

S. Elizabeth Bird is Professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida. She is author of The Audience in Everyday Life: Living in a Media World and editor of Dressing in Feathers: The Construction of the Indian in American Popular Culture.

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