The Antichrist

The Antichrist

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by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
     
 

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Save for his raucous, rhapsodical autobiography, "Ecce Homo," "The Antichrist" is the last thing that Nietzsche ever wrote, and so it may be accepted as a statement of some of his most salient ideas in their final form. Translated from the German by H.L. Mencken.

Show Excerpt to one of them publicly was already sufficient to set him off as one in imminent need of

Overview

Save for his raucous, rhapsodical autobiography, "Ecce Homo," "The Antichrist" is the last thing that Nietzsche ever wrote, and so it may be accepted as a statement of some of his most salient ideas in their final form. Translated from the German by H.L. Mencken.

Show Excerpt to one of them publicly was already sufficient to set him off as one in imminent need of psychiatrical attention. Belief in them had become a mark of inferiority, like the allied belief in madstones, magic and apparitions.

But though the theology of Christianity had thus sunk to the lowly estate of a mere delusion of the rabble, propagated on that level by the ancient caste of sacerdotal parasites, the ethics of Christianity continued to enjoy the utmost acceptance, and perhaps even more acceptance than ever before. It seemed to be generally felt, in fact, that they simply must be saved from the wreck--that the world would vanish into chaos if they went the way of the revelations supporting them. In this fear a great many judicious men joined, and so there arose what was, in essence, an absolutely new Christian cult--a cult, to wit, purged of all the supernaturalism superimposed upon the older cult by generations of theologians, and harking back to what was conceived to be the pure ethical doc

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781480008175
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
09/28/2012
Pages:
92
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.19(d)

Meet the Author

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a German philosopher. His writing included critiques of religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy, and science, using a distinctive style and displaying a fondness for aphorism. Nietzsche's influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism.

Nietzsche began his career as a philologist before turning to philosophy. At the age of 24 he became Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, but resigned in 1879 due to health problems, which would plague him for most of his life. In 1889 he exhibited symptoms of a serious mental illness, living out his remaining years in the care of his mother and sister until his death in 1900.

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The Anti-Christ 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is definitively the most important work from Nietzsche! It incorporates all the major concepts: the will to power, the ubermench, and the eternal return. Nietzsche's unabashed style culminates in his unapologetic critique of Christianity. This book cannot be read without reaction. It will inspire some, it will enrage others, but it will make all readers think and question. A reader that is unwilling to question or doubt, should not read this work. This is my favorite of Nietzsche's books. It reinforced, bluntly, what had been stated in ambiguity so many times before.
gernamgmer More than 1 year ago
I would give it 4 and a half stars. i thought the book was very well written and made numerous points about christianity that make it somewhat difficult to believe. i would recommend this book to anyone with an open mind
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TulaneGirl More than 1 year ago
Strange that Nietzsche was such a favorite of the Nazi regime considering his philosophy regarding christianity and his disappointment with the Germans. I take it the Third Reich selectively eliminated this book from their teachings on his philosophy and/or selectively quoted certain statements to support their doctrines...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
What strikes me most about this book is not the blatant blasphemy so much as the new perspective on religious criticism. Instead of wasting breath and time attempting to discredit the truthfulness of certain religions, he makes it a moot point. Even if Christianity were absolute truth, we should still not follow it. It's the slave morality that weakens the very being of mankind - not so much the supposed unreality of religion. Who ever said that truth and goodness are synonymous? This book attempts to refound our most cherished assumptions about what is important regarding life. Either agree or disagree, this book will always be a classic intrigue in my eyes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been thinking the same thing for years...Nietzsche gets my jumbled thoughts on the opium that is religion down superbly.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i recommend this book to anyone interested in the works of Nietzsche. I went to Catholic school for some years and this books can make even the most devote christian question what they've learned
Guest More than 1 year ago
This treatise takes every opportunity to blast religion in general and Christianity in particular. Nietzsche lays down his arguments by revealing the plain idiocy of religion and also by attacking many of the idiosyncrasies of religious institutions. This is an excellent piece of philosophy for the inquisitive mind. Some of the writting is hard to follow, but he organizes his arguments into psuedo-chapters that are 1-2 pages in length, so if you have trouble with one psuedo-chapter, it won't prevent you from understanding the book as a whole. Lastly, the introduction by H.L. Mencken is anti-semetic [not necesarilly against the Jewish religion insomuch as it's against the Jewish peoples] and, I think, written in a style that's intended to confuse any and all readers, including himself.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The Antichrist' is one of the best written books that attack religion and it's foolishness.