The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning [NOOK Book]

Overview


One of the first champions of the positive effects of gaming reveals the dark side of today’s digital and social media

 

Today’s schools are eager to use the latest technology in the classroom, but rather than improving learning, the new e-media can just as easily narrow students’ horizons. Education innovator James Paul Gee first documented the educational benefits of gaming a decade ago in his classic What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. Now, ...

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The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning

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Overview


One of the first champions of the positive effects of gaming reveals the dark side of today’s digital and social media

 

Today’s schools are eager to use the latest technology in the classroom, but rather than improving learning, the new e-media can just as easily narrow students’ horizons. Education innovator James Paul Gee first documented the educational benefits of gaming a decade ago in his classic What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. Now, with digital and social media at the center of modern life, he issues an important warning that groundbreaking new technologies, far from revolutionizing schooling, can stymy the next generation’s ability to resolve deep global challenges.  The solution—and perhaps our children’s future—lies in what Gee calls synchronized intelligence, a way of organizing people and their digital tools to solve problems, produce knowledge, and allow people to count and contribute.  Gee explores important strategies and tools for today’s parents, educators, and policy makers, including virtual worlds, artificial tutors, and ways to create collective intelligence where everyday people can solve hard problems. By harnessing the power of human creativity with interactional and technological sophistication we can finally overcome the limitations of today’s failing educational system and solve problems in our high-risk global world. This is a powerful and important call to reshape digital learning, engage children in a meaningful educational experience, and bridge inequality.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Gee (literacy studies, Arizona State Univ.; What Video Games Have To Teach Us About Learning and Literacy) has published widely on the subjects of gaming, linguistics, and literacy. Gee asserts in the preface, "this book is a stealth book about education," and throughout the rest of the work he tries to explain what makes people smart or not. Each chapter is as compelling as a keynote speech, but the discussion is circuitous and the author turns to video games as a forum for problem-solving only halfway through. Since Gee has published widely on the subject of video games, it's curious that this topic shows up so late in the book. Moreover, the points he discusses in previous chapters don't clearly relate. Armchair philosophers and social activists will appreciate this title, but those interested in understanding how new technologies shape learning or schooling will be disappointed. VERDICT A thoughtfully written and provocative text, but not prescriptive enough for parents and educators to heed. The title suggests a greater potential than the book delivers.—Elizabeth Connor, Daniel Lib. at The Citadel, Military Coll. of South Carolina
From the Publisher
“A compelling case for reframing methods of teaching and learning.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Jim Gee is one of the great thinkers of our time. His book, The Anti-Education Era, explains how we can all become smarter. His description of synchronized intelligence and why affinity spaces make for powerful learning should radically change how we think about education.”—Allan Collins, author of Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology

“Jim Gee is a great thinker. The book’s concept of the future of education as collective, powerful, effective groups combining multiple brains enhanced by technology around the world— what he calls affinity spaces, and capital M 'Minds'— is both original and brilliant.”—Marc Prensky, author of Brain Gain: Technology and the Quest for Digital Wisdom

"This book is a wonderful meditation on what it means to be an educated adult in a 21st-century, why this goal is critical to our future as a species, and what technologies can and cannot do to help us achieve the goal of an educated citizenry. It is a powerful antidote to the prevailing belief that more technology, and more STEM courses will save our economy and our planet."—Tony Wagner, author of Creating Innovators and The Global Achievement Gap

 

Kirkus Reviews
Thinking about thinking in education and the digital age. The subtitle suggests that the primary focus of the book would be the roles technology can play in the classroom. Gee (Literacy Studies/Arizona State Univ.; What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy, 2003) has a larger agenda, as he gives ancillary consideration to the technology involved and instead takes a broad look at ways of thinking and learning. He weaves over the line between the ills and the benefits of technology, finding examples of rapid collaboration and increased agency through online forums, social media, webcams video games, search tools, virtual worlds and similar connections. At the same time, he considers the shifting relevance of traditionally defined expertise as noncredentialed "amateurs" leverage the Internet to produce expert-level work. Gee's anecdotal stories are worthy examples of "thinking outside of the box"--e.g., the project to make modifications to the popular game The Sims in an effort to use it to simulate the life of a poor, single mother. The prevailing tone around these anecdotes, however, leans toward a frustrated lecture about these innovative ideas being the exception to the rule. For the most part, it seems, we have become a culture of nincompoops with the cognitive tools necessary to become smarter, but we're either misusing them or disregarding them. "Do we have the will to save ourselves?" asks the author in conclusion. "Will we each sink in our own boat, however large or small it is, or will we bail water together in a journey to a better future?" Gee makes a compelling case for reframing methods of teaching and learning, but the pedantic tone may put off some readers.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781137324115
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 1/8/2013
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 766,082
  • File size: 400 KB

Meet the Author


James Paul Gee has been featured in a variety of publications including Redbook, Child, Teacher, USA Today, Education Week, The Chicago Tribune, and more. He was formerly the Tashia Morgridge Professor of Reading at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is now the Mary Lou Fulton Presidential Professor of Literacy Studies at Arizona State University.  He is a founder of the Center for Games and Impact at ASU which orchestrated a national conversation on games and learning for the White House Office of Science and Technology. Described by The Chronicle of Higher Education as "a serious scholar who is taking a lead in an emerging field," he is the author of What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy.

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Table of Contents

Preface vii

1 Orwell's Question: Why Are Humans So Stupid? 1

Part I How to be Stupid

2 Short-Circuiting the Circuit of Human Reflective Action 11

3 The Limits of Human Memory 21

4 Mental Comfort Stories 29

5 Lack of Context 39

6 Lack of Experience 49

7 Pitfalls along Our Search for Status and Solidarity 59

8 Words Gone Awry 67

9 Lack of Agency 75

10 Institutions and Frozen Thought 85

11 Fact-Free Stories That Sound Good 95

12 Imagined Kin 103

13 Lonely Groups of One 113

14 When Not to Trust Experts 121

15 Evading Knowledge 133

16 Flight from Complexity 141

Part II How to Get Smart Before it's Too Late

17 Inclusive We: How We Can All Get Smarter Together 151

18 Big Minds, Not Little Minds 159

19 Mind Visions and New, Better Worlds 167

20 Synchronized Intelligence: Getting Our Minds and Tools in Synch 171

21 Interlude to Forestall Possible Misunderstandings 191

22 Getting Smarter Before It's Too Late 197

References 217

Index 237

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2014

    Josephine and Ashleigh

    As I was thinking up this bio, I realized these characters are basically a mash of Little Women and Pride and Prejudice... Oops...)) Name: Ashleigh Barouque.... Gender: Male (in the 1800's, Ashleigh [and also Ashley] were male names.).... Age: 18.... Position: Based on his looks, he probably would have been a busier servant, as the more attractive you were, the more it was likely you would see the family and/or guests of the house. .... Looks: He has a mop of black curls, and striking blue eyes. His cheek bones are high and sharp; his jawline quite chisled. A strapping young lad all around.... Wears: Whatever uniform given, or an old black suit with coat tails. (In the 19th century, servingmen wore coattails, not the rich folks.) .... Family: His twin sister, Josephine. •••••• Name: Josephine "Jo" Barouque... Gender: female... Age: 18... Position: Probably a busier maid, or possibly a lady's handmaiden, for the reasons given for Ashleigh... Looks: She's never cut her black curly locks, so they reach the top of her thighs, though it is always in a braided bun, ever since she reached the age of womanhood. Her eyes are even bluer than her brothers, (like Augustinian blue) and she has a faint smattering of freckles on her nose. She is a bit short, especially compared to her brother, who is a bit tall. (All around adorableness, basically)...Wears: Whatever uniform given, or a plain, pale blue fress with a square neckline that shows off the top of her br.easts, as was the style, and black heeled boots.....Family: Her twin brother, Ashleigh ••••••• Other: Ask

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2014

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Annabeth's Bio

    Rank: servant•Persona: patient, kind, bright, is not afraid to stand up for things, carefree•Dress: a beige calico dress with flowers on it, likes to go barefoot.•Appearance: blonde hair in a loose braid, green eyes, wears a locket•Age: not telling cause it is not proper.•

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Syren Bio

    Full name: Syren Mercy Darke///Rank: Pirate Royalty but due to her upbringer on a pirate ship she is very loose and does not often adhere to standards of the time.///Age: hard to tell but looks around 20///Apperence: long golden brown hair, small frame, large merald eyes with long lashes and lightly tanned skin///Dresses: liie a sea farer anything else ask

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Yuki's bio

    Name:Lady Yuki Cross
    <p>Description:Red dress and red gloves the red dress trails behind her
    <p>Personality:Sweet nice very patient
    <p>Anyrhing else ask.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Augustus's Bio.

    Name - Augustus Jones.
    <br>
    Age - 22
    <br>
    Gender - Take a guess.
    <br>
    Job/Role - Next in line to be a Lord of a somewhat distant land.
    <br>
    Looks - He has short light brown hair and green eyes. He is 6'3". He is usually dressed formally and walks with a fancy cane. He has pale skin.
    <br>
    Personality - He is usually sarcastic and rebellious. He likes books. Just get to know him.
    <br>
    Status - Single.
    <br>
    Any questions? Ask.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Tally's bio

    Name: Tally // age: 19 // position: maid // appereance: bright blue eyes, dark brown hair, tan skin, and about 5'6 // personality: just talk to me // other: just ask.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Nylalas bio

    Name nylala nickname nyla hair color brown eye color hazel rank servant age 16 anything else ask

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Clarissa's bio

    Name:clarissa elizabeth daae//age:17// rank:servent// looks: dark brown hair and soft brown eyes. A hourglass figure and a radient smile//history: she is posing as a servent but is really lady clarissa. Shes running from a ex lover who intends to kil her. Her dream and hope is to find true love.// shes sweet and kind. Always looking out for the less fortuneate. // anything else please feel free to ask

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Auriyah's Biography

    Hai •~•
    <p>
    Name-
    <br>
    Auriyah Issahbellah Trinity Jaurez.
    <p>
    NickNames-
    <br>
    Auri, Aura, Riya, Ri-Ri, Aurs, Auriy-Ha....
    <p>
    Goes by-
    <br>
    Auri...
    <p>
    Age-
    <br>
    Not telling...
    <p>
    Personality-
    <br>
    Strange on several different levels, sweet usually, lovable, amazing on as many levels as I am strange.
    <p>
    Position-
    <br>
    Gah... I tolf you people I don't wanna be workie, but here I go. I'm gonna be a, wait for it, Maid. But not a normal Maid. I'm an Itallian Princess that has to be in disquise to live. Nobody knows.
    <p>
    Appearence-
    <br>
    Actually looks very... Unique. I have Raven-Black, shoulder length, layered hair. In my world, Yay For Right-Side Bangs! Yeah... Shut up. My eyes are violet with a brown ring on the outter part of the iris. From right under my right eye, across my nose, and to right uder my left ear, there's a scar from a dagger. I'm partially blind in my left eye. Uhm... I'm 'bout 110 pounds and 5'4" I think. I'm quite tan, due to my Itallian ethinicity.
    <p>
    Wears-
    <br>
    Usually, a dark red 'French Maid' outfit. Occassionall, I'll wear a reagular, non-work dress.
    <p>
    Other-
    <br>
    Ask.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Lord Witticker's bio

    Full name: William Witticker....age: 26....gender: Male.......Appearance: raven black hair, and blue eyes.....Clothes: the proper upper-class menswear from those days....personality: meet him to find out.....social status: alone...but dont try anything.....Rank: Lord of the manor(s)

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  • Posted March 8, 2013

    An important book to read.

    This person has opinions on the state of education, which I happen to share. Beyond bias, I found this book delves deeply into what is wrong relative to us individually and what we might do.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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