The Apes of Wrath

Overview


In the Rue Morgue, the jungles of Tarzan, the fables of Aesop, and outer space, the apes in these seventeen fantastic tales boldly go where humans dare not. Including a foreword from Rupert Wyatt, the director of Rise of the Planet of the Apes, this provocative anthology delves into our fascination with and fear of our simian cousins.

“Evil Robot Monkey” introduces a disgruntled chimp implanted with a chip that makes him cleverer than both his cohort and humans alike. In “Murders in the Rue Morgue,” a murder ...

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Overview


In the Rue Morgue, the jungles of Tarzan, the fables of Aesop, and outer space, the apes in these seventeen fantastic tales boldly go where humans dare not. Including a foreword from Rupert Wyatt, the director of Rise of the Planet of the Apes, this provocative anthology delves into our fascination with and fear of our simian cousins.

“Evil Robot Monkey” introduces a disgruntled chimp implanted with a chip that makes him cleverer than both his cohort and humans alike. In “Murders in the Rue Morgue,” a murder mystery unravels with the discovery of a hair that does not appear quite human. Merging steampunk with slapstick, “The Ape-Box Affair” has a not-so-ordinary orangutan landing on Earth in a spherical flying ship—where he is promptly mistaken for an alien. King Kong sets a terrible example with booze and Barbie dolls in “Godzilla’s 12-Step Program.”

If you’ve ever wondered what makes humans different from apes, soon you’ll be asking yourself, is it even less than we think?

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This impressive anthology includes 18 short stories by authors ancient (Aesop) and recent (Karen Joy Fowler, Mary Robinette Kowal), as well as three original articles tracing apes in literature, comics, cinema, and theater. Poe’s familiar “Murders in the Rue Morgue” makes use of an orangutan as a necessary plot mechanism, as does James Blaylock’s hilarious tongue-in-cheek takeoff on Victorian fiction, “The Ape-Box Affair.” Most of the other stories explore moral and ethical questions around relationships between humans and other primates. Franz Kafka’s chilling “A Report to an Academy” and Gustave Flaubert’s unsettling “Quidquid Volueris,” both newly translated by Gio Clairval, denounce decadent Western culture. Hugh B. Cave’s rousing “The Cult of the White Ape” and Clark Ashton Smith’s “The Maze of Maâl Dweb” illustrate the Depression-era American public’s lust for escapist adventure, while Edgar Rice Burroughs’s “Tarzan’s First Love” reaches into murkier depths, exploring the sexual attraction-repulsion between species that makes Leigh Kennedy’s “Her Furry Face” and Pat Murphy’s “Rachel in Love” so painful and poignant. This is no gimmicky set of sideshows but a powerful exploration of the blurry line between animal and human. (Mar.)
From the Publisher

“This impressive anthology includes 18 short stories by authors ancient (Aesop) and recent (Karen Joy Fowler, Mary Robinette Kowal), as well as three original articles tracing apes in literature, comics, cinema, and theater.... A powerful exploration of the blurry line between animal and human.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Aficionados of apes in literature and film should enjoy this gathering of new and old stories.”
Library Journal

“These are all fine additions to any fantasy lover’s library.... Climb up into your tree, peel a banana, and enjoy the treats herein.”
Sci Fi Magazine

“An eclectic, enjoyable mix of fiction and nonfiction...”
SF Signal

Library Journal
Bringing together such classic writers such as Gustav Flaubert ("Quidquid Volueris"), Edgar Allan Poe ("The Murders in the Rue Morgue"), Edgar Rice Burroughs ("Tarzan's First Love"), Franz Kafka ("A Report to an Academy"), and Robert E. Howard ("Red Shadows") with modern fantasy and horror authors, editor Klaw, co-owner of Mojo Press, a noted publisher of graphic novels and themed anthologies, has assembled a collection of 13 stories revolving around the great apes and playing upon their similarities to and differences from humans. Including James P. Blaylock's steampunk comedy of errors ("The Ape-Box Affair") featuring a space-traveling ape, several bumbling Londoners, and a mysterious silver box or two, and Philip Jose Farmer's continuation of a classic ape story ("After King Kong Fell"), this volume attests to literature and film's fascination with our primate cousins. The foreward by Rupert Wyatt, director of Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and a pair of essays by Jess Nevins ("Apes in Literature") and Rick Klaw ("Gorilla of Your Dreams: A Brief History of Simian Cinema") make this more than just a curious short-story collection. VERDICT Aficionados of apes in literature and film should enjoy this gathering of new and old stories.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616960858
  • Publisher: Tachyon Publications
  • Publication date: 1/8/2013
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 1,410,044
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


Richard Klaw is the author of the acclaimed genre blog The Geek Curmudgeon and was the fiction editor at RevolutionSF. He is the co-editor of the ground-breaking original anthology of short fiction in graphic form, Weird Business; the editor of The Big Bigfoot Book; and the co-founder of Mojo Press, one of the first publishers to produce both graphic novels and fiction. Klaw’s essays and observations are collected in Geek Confidential: Echoes from the 21st Century. Over the past decade, he has written about fictional simians for a variety of publications, including Moving Pictures Magazine, The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy, King Kong Is Back!, and Kong Is King.
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