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The Archaeology Education Handbook : Sharing the Past with Kids

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Overview

This innovative guidebook introduces archaeologists to the complexities and possibilities of educating children in archaeology. The book explains the culture of the educational system, discusses the interface between education and archaeology, forewarns of sensitive and inflammatory issues, and provides real-world examples of a variety of successful archaeology education programs. Throughout, the emphasis is on exemplary programming that meets the needs of students, educators and archaeologists in a realistic, achievable manner. Published in cooperation with the Society for American Archaeology.

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Editorial Reviews

Journal Of Anthropological Research
I have done my share of guest lecturing to K-12 students.... If I had had access to the Handbook, I would have been far more effective. Any archaeologist who wants to be involved in such ventures can discover how to get started and what to do along the way, whether it be for a single lecture or a year-long course....For those archaeologists already convinced that public archaeology is a vital part of the discipline (regardless of nonrewards), this is a valuable book. If you are not convinced, read Sabloff first and then read the relevant parts of the Handbook to find out How To Do It.
— Patricia C. Rice, (West Virginia University)
American Anthropologist
The Archaeology Education Handbook is the first of its kind to address how archaeology can be presented practically and effectively to a K-12 audience of teachers and students. The editors of this well-written and readable volume have chosen a group of talented and dedicated archaeology and outreach educators to describe what one needs to know to become a successful archaeology educator, including mistakes to avoid.... Archaeologists entering the realm of archaeology education will gain valuable information and confidence by reading this highly informative and engaging book.
— P. Ann Kaupp, Smithsonian Institution
Public Historian
As the reader will soon discover, there are many nonarchaeologist professionals including classroom teachers, museum educators, and land managers, who have become both the medium and the means of conveying the discipline of archaeology and relaying the message of stewardship and heritage education to K-12 learners....It is difficult to imagine how the contributors might have composed a more useful or definitive volume for archaeologists who may increasingly find themselves in the role of public educators....This volume is truly an indispensable resource for public archaeology educators and is destined to become the essential guide in this area for some time to come.
— Lynn M. Alex, Office of the State Archaeologist, Iowa City
Journal of Anthropological Research - Patricia C. Rice
I have done my share of guest lecturing to K-12 students.... If I had had access to the Handbook, I would have been far more effective. Any archaeologist who wants to be involved in such ventures can discover how to get started and what to do along the way, whether it be for a single lecture or a year-long course....For those archaeologists already convinced that public archaeology is a vital part of the discipline (regardless of nonrewards), this is a valuable book. If you are not convinced, read Sabloff first and then read the relevant parts of the Handbook to find out How To Do It.
American Anthropologist - P. Ann Kaupp
The Archaeology Education Handbook is the first of its kind to address how archaeology can be presented practically and effectively to a K-12 audience of teachers and students. The editors of this well-written and readable volume have chosen a group of talented and dedicated archaeology and outreach educators to describe what one needs to know to become a successful archaeology educator, including mistakes to avoid.... Archaeologists entering the realm of archaeology education will gain valuable information and confidence by reading this highly informative and engaging book.
Public Historian - Lynn M. Alex
As the reader will soon discover, there are many nonarchaeologist professionals including classroom teachers, museum educators, and land managers, who have become both the medium and the means of conveying the discipline of archaeology and relaying the message of stewardship and heritage education to K-12 learners....It is difficult to imagine how the contributors might have composed a more useful or definitive volume for archaeologists who may increasingly find themselves in the role of public educators....This volume is truly an indispensable resource for public archaeology educators and is destined to become the essential guide in this area for some time to come.
American Antiquity, Vol. 67.4 (2002) - Robert Brooks
For many years, archaeologists working with the public schools have bemoaned the absence of published materials containing pracitical advice and guidance. With The Archaeology Education Handbook, we finally have a compensive sourcebook covering the essentials of working with children in the school cariculum. The Society for American Archaeology deserves special mention for their contribution and cooperation in publishing such a sourcebook.
The Midden, Vol. 34, No.2, 2002 - Teresa Trost
The book raises issues that are relevant to any archaeologist...contains bits of wisdom and practical exercises anyone doing public archaeology must use... [the inclusion of] annotated lists of related reading material at the end of most chapters makes this book an invaluable reference manual.
From the Foreword by Francis P. McManamon
This volume brings together as editors and authors some of the most committed and knowledgeable archaeologists who have been involved in efforts to include archaeological topics in the formal educational programs in elementary and high schools. The articles and commentary in this volume distill the expertise, insights, and recommendations of expert archaeological educators.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Karolyn Smardz is currently doing her doctorate at the University of Waterloo on the history of race and slavery. She has devoted her career to public and educational archaeology, most often working on historic sites. In 1985, she and her colleague, Peter Hamalanien, founded the Archaeological Resource Center in Toronto, and she later developed public programs for the Institute for Minnesota Archaeology. Internationally noted as a public heritage consultant, speaker, and writer, Karolyn is especially concerned with the role archaeology education can play in developing intercultural tolerance and understanding in today's global village. She conducts research in underground railroad history. Shelley J. Smith has a B.A. from Pennsylvania State and an M.A. from Washington State University, both in anthropology. She is chief of the Environmental and Planning Branch in the Bureau of Land Management, Utah State office. Shelley directed the development of the Intrigue of the Past Archaeology Education program and has written numerous articles and papers on archaeology and environmental education. She is vice-chair of the Society for American Archaeology's Public Education Committee.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Preface Chapter 2 Foreword: Public Education: A Part of Archaeological Professionalism Chapter 3 Introduction Part 4 The Culture of Teaching: The Educational System and Educational Theory Chapter 5 Accessing Educational Systems in Canada and the United States Chapter 6 Governmental Education Standards and K-12 Archaeology Programs Chapter 7 Cognitive and Moral Development of Children: Implications for Archaeological Education Chapter 8 Learning and Teaching Styles: Reaching All Students Chapter 9 Heritage Education for Special Students Chapter 10 Developing Lessons about Archaeology: From a Teacher's Journal Part 11 The Interface: Archaeologists Working with Educators Chapter 12 National Geographic and Time Magazine as Textbooks: How Teachers Learn about Archaeology Chapter 13 Including Archaeology in K-12 Teacher Education Chapter 14 Brokering Cultures: Archaeologists Reach Out to Teachers Chapter 15 From Context to Content: Instructional Media for Precollegiate Audiences Chapter 16 Teaching Archaeology with Educational Technology Chapter 17 Against the Clock: Introducing Archaeology in Time-Limited Situations Chapter 18 Assessing Archaeology Education: Five Guiding Questions Part 19 The Danger Zones: Issues in Teaching Archaeology Chapter 20 Teaching Archaeology Without the Dig: What's Left Chapter 21 Simulated Excavations and Critical Thinking Skills Chapter 22 Digging with Kids: Teaching Students to Touch the Past Chapter 23 Archaeology and Values: Respect and Responsibility for Our Heritage Chapter 24 Who Paints the Past? Teaching Archaeology in a Multicultural World Chapter 25 Gatekeeping, Housekeeping, Peacekeeping: Goals for Teaching Archaeology in the Public Schools Part 26 The Provenience: Archaeology Education in the Real World Chapter 27 Applying the Message to the Medium Chapter 28 Politics, Publicity, and the Public: Urban Archaeology in the Public Eye Chapter 29 Crow Canyon Archaeological Center: Why An Independent, Nonprofit Center Makes Sense Chapter 30 Teaching the Past in Museums Chapter 31 Teaching Archaeologists to Teach Archaeology Chapter 32 On Site and Open to the Public: Education at Archaeological Parks Chapter 33 Archaeology Education Programs: A Long-Term Regional Approach Part 34 Conclusions and Perspectives Chapter 35 Environmental Education: Perspectives for Archaeology Chapter 36 Retrospective: Personal Thoughts on the Maturation of Archaeological Education

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