The Archaeology of Weapons: Arms and Armour from Prehistory to the Age of Chivalry

Overview

Tremendously detailed and thorough account of premodern weapons of war — from the prehistoric Bronze and Iron Ages and the breakup of the Roman Empire, to the Viking era and the Age of Chivalry. Profusely illustrated with a host of armor and weapons: daggers, longbows, crossbows, helmets, swords, shields, spears and more.

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Overview

Tremendously detailed and thorough account of premodern weapons of war — from the prehistoric Bronze and Iron Ages and the breakup of the Roman Empire, to the Viking era and the Age of Chivalry. Profusely illustrated with a host of armor and weapons: daggers, longbows, crossbows, helmets, swords, shields, spears and more.

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Editorial Reviews

Antiques & the Arts
...[T]races the development of arms and armor, from the weapons of the prehistoric Bronze and Iron Ages through the breakup of the Roman Empire and the folk-migrations of the period, to the era of the Vikings and the Middle Ages.
Booknews
Oakeshott, widely recognized as a leading authority on medieval European arms, here traces their development from the Bronze Age, relying mostly on the archaeological record supported by contemporary literature in the later periods. The treatment is chronological to demonstrate the unbroken development of arms from bronze to iron, through the great migrations and breakup of the Roman Empire and the rise and fall of the Vikings. Then he comes to his most cherished period, Chivalry, which takes up over half the book. Includes a new preface, but otherwise reprinted from the 1960 edition. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Antiques & the Arts
...[T]races the development of arms and armor, from the weapons of the prehistoric Bronze and Iron Ages through the breakup of the Roman Empire and the folk-migrations of the period, to the era of the Vikings and the Middle Ages.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction
Part One THE PREHISTORIC PERIOD
I "THE PITILESS BRONZE"
II IRON COMES TO EUROPE: THE HALLSTATT PEOPLE
III THE GAULS
Part Two THE HEROIC AGE
IV THE GREAT MIGRATIONS
V ROME IN DECLINE: THE GOTHIC CAVALRY
VI THE BOG-DEPOSITS OF DENMARK
VII THE ARMS OF THE MIGRATION PERIOD
Part Three THE VIKINGS
VIII SWORDS IN THE VIKING PERIOD
IX THE VIKINGS AT WAR
X FROM CHARLEMAGNE TO THE NORMANS
Part Four THE AGE OF CHIVALRY
XI "THE "GAY SCIENCE" OF CHIVALRY"
XII "SWORD TYPES AND BLADE INSCRIPTIONS, 1100-1325"
XIII SWORD HILTS AND FITTINGS
XIV THE SWORD IN WEAR
XV "THE COMPLETE ARMING OF A MAN", 1100-1325"
XVI AMOUR AND THE LONGBOW IN THE FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES
XVII SWORDS AND DAGGERS IN THE FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES
Appendix : Four Date-Charts
Bibliography
Index
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2001

    Oakeshott ´s outstanding report

    The author has successfully contributed to a much traveled field of archeology, but one from which we seldom see any worthwhile developments: primitive weaponry. Oakshott has, since 1060, established a remarkable study that is similar in importance to Sir Burton¿s unfinished work. I am but an amateur and aficionado, but even I can recognize the worth of such results. The book itself exposes the matter in a comprehensible, clear and straightforward manner (although without loosing the required complexity of such a vast theme) and is enriched with many fine illustrations and examples, that enables even the most unaware student to recognize the many marvelous details of a lost art. Bravo!

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