The Arctic Problem: and Narrative of the Peary Relief Expedition of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Arctic Problem: and Narrative of the Peary Relief Expedition of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. Writtem by Angelo Heilprin, (Leader of the Peary Relief Expedition, Professor in the Academy of Natural Sciences, and President of the Geographical Club of Philadelphia.) This book was originally published in Philadelphia in 1893. (210 pages)

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The Arctic Problem: and Narrative of the Peary Relief Expedition of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia

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Overview

The Arctic Problem: and Narrative of the Peary Relief Expedition of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. Writtem by Angelo Heilprin, (Leader of the Peary Relief Expedition, Professor in the Academy of Natural Sciences, and President of the Geographical Club of Philadelphia.) This book was originally published in Philadelphia in 1893. (210 pages)

This book also contains 16 Illustrations from photographs, and are included at the end of the book.

The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable. This did not involve changing the substance of the text.

Preface:

.....The interest which at the present moment centres about Polar exploration is perhaps broad enough to permit of a few additional pages being added to the lengthening literature of the subject, even though they be wanting in a recital of those mishaps and hardships which have made Arctic reading so fascinating. In this belief the author offers the following pages, which are in the main a record of personal experiences in the North, and reflections upon the best method of attaining the object which has so long baffled the energies of the hardy explorer. A portion of the work has already appeared in narrative form in the pages of Scribner's Magazine, and another portion is an amplification of an address delivered before the Geographical Club of Philadelphia.
.....The author feels that the record of the Peary Relief Expedition would not be complete without a reference to the numerous helping hands which made the expedition possible, and permitted of the full accomplishment of its mission; —to all these he owes a no small debt of gratitude, and to all, without distinction by name, he expresses his acknowledgments. A special mention should, however, be made of the names of a few gentlemen who more particularly interested themselves in the expedition, and gave their assistance in other directions besides the one very necessary one of raising the required funds for the undertaking. The distribution of gifts of charity to the Eskimo was a feature of the expedition.
.....To the members of his party, for the faithful accomplishment of their duties, and the good will which ever prompted their work, the leader is placed under special obligation; and he is similarly indebted to the officers and crew of the good ship Kite, the vessel of the expedition.
A. H.
Philadelphia, May, 1893.

Contents:

I. The Arctic Problem — II. Polar Expeditions — III. The Spitzbergen Route to the Pole — IV. The Peary Relief Expedition — V. A Lost Companion — VI. The Greenland Ice-Cap and its Glaciers

Excerpts:

.....If it be asked why Parry failed to reach a higher point than he did, the answer is immediately found in his narrative: the southerly drift of the ice annihilated the actual northing made. But it is manifest that with the ice in a condition of stability, as it probably largely is at an earlier season, and with the equipment so adjusted as to obviate the necessity of "doubling" over the line of traverse, a much greater daily advance could be made than Parry found possible, and one that would three or four times cover the four-mile drift of the ice. With a daily advantage of only eight miles the Pole would be reached from the 82d parallel in sixty days; while on the other hand, the return journey with the drift would probably not occupy much more than half that period of time.
.....A further question suggests itself in connection with the Arctic problem: Has the Pole ever been more nearly accessible than it is at the present time? Without entering into a discussion of the geological problem or to a consideration of remote periods of time, it can be said that we are in possession of a certain amount of evidence which goes far toward giving an affirmative to the question. We owe chiefly to the Honorable Daines Barrington, that indefatigable advocate of Polar expeditions of the last century, the collection of data bearing upon this point. From these it would appear that a century or more ago voyages to the far north were not an exceptional circumstance—indeed, that the latitudes attained on these voyages were in some instances beyond what it has been possible to attain since. Thus, it is asserted that Capt. Mac Callam, in command of the Campbeltown, one of the ships employed in the Greenland Fishery, in 1751 penetrated to 83° 30' in a perfectly open sea, with no ice visible to the northward. In 1754 three whalers are reported to have passed beyond the 82d parallel (to 82° 15', 83° and 84° 30'); the circumstances connected with the voyage of Mr. Stephens, when the latitude of 84° 30' is said to have been attained, ........
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013631274
  • Publisher: Digital Text Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 11/5/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 210
  • File size: 661 KB

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