The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from Around the World

( 5 )

Overview

Winner of the 2013 James Beard Foundation Book Award for Reference and Scholarship, and a New York Times bestseller, The Art of Fermentation is the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published. Sandor Katz presents the concepts and processes behind fermentation in ways that are simple enough to guide a reader through their first experience making sauerkraut or yogurt, and in-depth enough to provide greater understanding and insight for experienced ...

See more details below
Audiobook (CD - Library - Unabridged CD)
$107.99
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$119.99 List Price
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (4) from $69.23   
  • New (2) from $78.18   
  • Used (2) from $69.23   
The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from around the World

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$22.99
BN.com price
(Save 42%)$39.95 List Price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

Winner of the 2013 James Beard Foundation Book Award for Reference and Scholarship, and a New York Times bestseller, The Art of Fermentation is the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published. Sandor Katz presents the concepts and processes behind fermentation in ways that are simple enough to guide a reader through their first experience making sauerkraut or yogurt, and in-depth enough to provide greater understanding and insight for experienced practitioners.

While Katz expertly contextualizes fermentation in terms of biological and cultural evolution, health and nutrition, and even economics, this is primarily a compendium of practical information—how the processes work; parameters for safety; techniques for effective preservation; troubleshooting; and more.

With two-color illustrations and extended resources, this book provides essential wisdom for cooks, homesteaders, farmers, gleaners, foragers, and food lovers of any kind who want to develop a deeper understanding and appreciation for arguably the oldest form of food preservation, and part of the roots of culture itself.

Readers will find detailed information on fermenting vegetables; sugars into alcohol (meads, wines, and ciders); sour tonic beverages; milk; grains and starchy tubers; beers (and other grain-based alcoholic beverages); beans; seeds; nuts; fish; meat; and eggs, as well as growing mold cultures, using fermentation in agriculture, art, and energy production, and considerations for commercial enterprises. Sandor Katz has introduced what will undoubtedly remain a classic in food literature, and is the first—and only—of its kind.

Winner of the 2013 James Beard Foundation Book Award for Reference and Scholarship

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Katz takes fermentation down to the molecular level while keeping it conversational and accessible to the generalist. Fermentation foodies will be ecstatic." —-Library Journal
Library Journal
This is not a line-by-line recipe cookbook, but it contains detailed instructions on fermenting (or creating via fermentation) nearly every imaginable food or beverage. After a foreword by Michael Pollan, Katz (Wild Fermentation) explores the scientific basis of fermentation, then gives details for creating everything from yogurts to prosciutto to wines, beer, and kombucha. He emphasizes how fermentation influenced human development. Used to preserve food, it affected human biology so that humans could eat foods that would be poisonous otherwise, and it had an impact on global human culture as a reflection of indigenous cultural identity. Simply put, fermentation allows lactic acid bacteria naturally found in the air to overcome and exclude bacteria that are harmful to humans, and it increases advantageous chemical compounds, such as vitamins, in the process. There is a generous photo section of tools, containers, and processes; along with fascinating electron microscope photos of bacteria, which convey a sense of wonder at the unseen world of fermentation. VERDICT Katz takes fermentation down to the molecular level while keeping it conversational and accessible to the generalist. Fermentation foodies will be ecstatic.—Meredith Toumayan, Langley-Adams Lib., Groveland, MA
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781452642024
  • Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/29/2013
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Library - Unabridged CD
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 6.90 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Sandor Ellix Katz is a self-taught fermentation experimentalist and the author of The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved: Inside America's Underground Food Movements.

Sean Crisden is a multitalented actor and an AudioFile Earphones Award–winning narrator who has recorded audiobooks in almost every genre, from science fiction to romance. He has also voiced characters in numerous video games and appeared in many commercials and films, including The Last Airbender.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword Michael Pollan xi

Acknowledgments xv

Introduction xvii

Chapter 1 Fermentation as a Coevolutionary Force 1

Bacteria: Our Ancestors and Coevolutionary Partners 1

Fermentation and Culture 6

Fermentation and Coevolution 10

Fermentation as a Natural Phenomenon 12

The War on Bacteria........13

Cultivating a Biophilic Consciousness 14

Chapter 2 Practical Benefits of Fermentation 17

The Preservation Benefits of Fermentation, and Their Limits 18

The Health Benefits of Fermented Foods 21

Fermentation as a Strategy for Energy Efficiency 32

The Extraordinary Flavors of Fermentation 33

Chapter 3 Basic Concepts and Equipment 37

Substrates and Microbial Communities 37

Wild Fermentation Versus Culturing 38

Selective Environments 39

Community Evolution and Succession 41

Cleanliness and Sterilization 41

Cross-Contamination 43

Water 44

Salt 44

Darkness and Sunlight 46

Fermentation Vessels 47

Jar Method 48

Crock Method 49

Crock Lids 51

Different Crock Designs 52

Metal Vessels 53

Plastic Vessels 53

Wooden Vessels 54

Canoa 55

Gourds and Other Fruits as Fermentation Vessels 55

Baskets 56

Pit Fermentation 56

Pickle Presses 58

Vegetable Shredding Devices 58

Pounding Tools 59

Alcohol-Making Vessels and Air Locks 59

Siphons and Racking 60

Bottles and Bottling 61

Hydrometers 63

Thermometers 63

Cider and Grape Presses 63

Grain mills 64

Steamers 64

Incubation Chambers 64

Curing Chambers 66

Temperature Controllers 66

Masking Tape and Markers 67

Chapter 4 Fermenting Sugars into Alcohol: Meads, Wines, and Ciders 69

Yeast 71

Simple Mead 72

Botanical Enhancements to Mead: T'ej and Baälche 74

Fruit and Flower Meads 76

Simple and Short Versus Dry and Aged 77

Continuous Starter Method 79

Herbal Elixir Meads 79

Wine from Grapes 82

Cider and Perry 84

Sugar-Based Country Wines 86

Alcoholic Beverages from Other Concentrated Sweeteners 87

Fermented Fruit Salads 88

Plant Sap Ferments 88

Carbonating Alcoholic Beverages 91

Mixed Source Legacy 92

Troubleshooting 92

Chapter 5 Fermenting Vegetables (and Some Fruits Too) 95

Lactic Acid Bacteria 96

Vitamin C and Fermented Vegetables 97

Kraut-Chi Basics 97

Chop 98

Salt: Dry-Salting Versus Brining 99

Pounding or Squeezing Vegetables (or Soaking in a Brine) 100

Pack 101

How Long to Ferment? 102

Surface Molds and Yeasts 103

Which Vegetables Can Be Fermented? 105

Spicing 109

Sauerkraut 110

Kimchi 112

Chinese Pickling 114

Indian Pickling 116

Fermenting Hot Sauce, Relishes, Salsas, Chutneys, and Other Condiments 117

Himalayan Gundruk and Sinki 118

Considerations for Salt-Free Vegetable Ferments 118

Brining 120

Sour Pickles 123

Brining Mushrooms 125

Brining Olives 126

Dilly Beans 127

Lactic Acid Fermentations of Fruit 128

Kawal 131

Adding Starters to Vegetable Ferments 132

Liquid Forms of Vegetable Ferments: Beet and Lettuce Kvass, Cultured Cabbage Juice, Kaanji, and Salgam Suyu 135

Tsukemono: Japanese Pickling Styles 137

Cooking with Fermented Vegetables 142

Laphet (Fermented Tea Leaves) 142

Troubleshooting 142

Chapter 6 Fermenting Sour Tonic Beverages 147

Carbonation 148

Ginger Beer with Ginger Bug 150

Kvass 151

Tepache and Aluá 153

Mabi/Mauby 154

Water Kefir (aka Tibicos) 155

Whey as a Starter 160

Roots Beer 161

Pru 162

Sweet Potato Fly 163

Inventive Soda Flavors 164

Smreka 165

Noni 166

Kombucha: Panacea or Peril? 167

Making Kombucha 169

Kombucha Candy: Nata 174

Jun 175

Vinegar 175

Shrub 177

Troubleshooting 177

Chapter 7 Fermenting Milk 181

Raw Milk: Microbiology and Politics 183

Simple Clabbering 185

Yogurt 186

Kefir 192

Viili 196

Other Milk Cultures 197

Plant Origins of Milk Cultures 199

Crème Fraîche, Butter, and Buttermilk 200

Whey 201

Cheese 202

Factory Versus Farmstead Cheesemaking 205

Non-Dairy Milks, Yogurts, and Cheeses 207

Troubleshooting 208

Chapter 8 Fermenting Grains and Starchy Tubers 211

Engrained Patterns 212

Soaking Grains 218

Sprouting 219

Rejuvelac 220

Porridges 220

Fermenting Oatmeal 221

Grits/Polenta 221

Atole Agrio 223

Millet Porridge 224

Sorghum Porridge 224

Rice Congeep 225

Old Bread Porridge 225

Potato Porridge 225

Poi 226

Cassava 227

SouthAmerican Cassava Breads 229

Fermenting Potatoes 230

Sourdough: Starting One and Maintaining It 231

Flatbreads/Pancakes 236

Sourdough Bread 237

Sour Rye Porridge Soup (Zur) 238

Sierra Rice 240

Hoppers/Appam 241

Kishk and Keckek el Fouqara 243

Fermenting Grains with Other Kinds of Foods 244

Fermenting Leftover Grains (and Starchy Tubers) 244

Troubleshooting 244

Chapter 9 Fermenting Beers and Other Grain-Based Alcoholic Beverages 247

Wild Yeast Beers 248

Tesgüino 250

Sorghum Beer 253

Merissa (Sudanese Toasted Sorghum Beer) 256

Asian Rice Brews 261

Basic Rice Beer 262

Sweet Potato Makgeolli 264

Millet Tongba 265

Saké 266

Malting Barley 268

Simple Opaque Barley Beer 270

Cassava and Potato Beers 271

Beyond Hops: Beers with Other Herbs and Botanical Additives 273

Distillation 275

Chapter 10 Growing Mold Cultures 279

Incubation Chambers for Growing Molds 281

Making Tempeh 284

Cooking with Tempeh 290

Propagating Tempeh Spores 291

Making Koji 296

Amazaké 299

Plant Sources of Mold Cultures 301

Troubleshooting 305

Chapater 11 Fermenting Beans, Seeds, and Nuts 309

Cultured Seed and/or Nut Cheeses, Pâtés, and Milks 310

Acorns 310

Coconut Oil 311

Cacao, Coffee, and Vanilla Fermentation 312

Spontaneous Fermentation of Beans 313

Idli/Dosa|Dhokla\Khaman 314

Aearajé (Afro-Brazilian Fritters of Fermented Black-Eyed Peas) 315

Soybeans 319

Miso 318

Using Miso 323

Soy Sauce 325

Fermented Soy "Nuggets": Hamanatto and Douchi 327

Natto 328

Dawadawa and Related West African Fermented Seed Condiments 331

Fermenting Tofu 333

Troubleshooting 335

Chapter 12 Fermenting Meat, Fish, and Eggs 337

Drying, Salting, Smoking, and Curing 339

Dry-Curing Basics 341

Brining: Corned Beef and Tongue 344

Dry-Cured Sausages 345

Fish Sauce 352

Pickled Fish 354

Fermenting Fish with Grains 355

Filipino Burong Isda and Balao-Balao 356

Japanese Nare Zushi 358

Fermenting Fish and Meat in Whey, Sauerkraut, and Kimchi 359

Fermenting Eggs 361

Cod Liver Oil 362

Burying Fish and Meat 363

High Meat 366

Meat and Fish Ethics 367

Chapter13 Considerations for Commercial Enterprises 369

Consistency 370

First Steps 373

Scaling Up 375

Codes, Regulations, and Licensing 378

Different Business Models: Farm-Based Operations, Diversification, and Specialization 383

Chapter14 Non-Food Applications of Fermentation 387

Agriculture 387

Bioremediation 396

Waste Management 398

Disposal of Human Bodies 401

Fiber and Building Arts 401

Energy Production 407

Medicinal Applications of Fermentation 409

Fermentation for Skin Care and Aromatherapy 411

Fermentation Art 412

Epilogue: A Cultural Revivalist Manifesto 415

Resources 419

Glossary 435

A Note on References 439

Books Cited 443

Endnotes 451

Index 481

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 12, 2012

    The very first sentence of the Library Review's description of t

    The very first sentence of the Library Review's description of this book states that it is not a line-by-line cookbook. Neither the cover nor a quick flip through the pages gives the impression of a cookbook either, so don't be bothered by the 1-star reviewer who gave this book a bad rating for not being something it never claimed to be. Sandor Katz is a self taught expert in fermentation whose passion for the subject is apparent. He draws on microbiology and culinary anthropology to explore the development and application of fermentation to many types of foods in all cultures over time. The book is very wide in its scope and has a very big-picture approach. I enjoyed all the bits of information and came away more confident in my fermentation experimentations. My first sauerkraut and pickled peppers turned out great! Don't be put off that Katz doesn't tell you precisely how much of each ingredient to include. I doubt if a time-traveler to the year 1600 in Germany would find Lars and Peter arguing about whether their barrel of pickles should contain 20 heads of garlic or 25. ;)

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 6, 2012

    The title, subtitles, and jacket blurbs on this book are grossly

    The title, subtitles, and jacket blurbs on this book are grossly misleading. I purchased it thinking it would be the vegetable fermentation equivalent of the excellent book on curing Charcuterie by Ruhlman & Polcyn--wrong. The book does not contain a single accurate tested recipe. Everything is vague with regard to the ratio of salt to vegetable, with the constant refrain: if mold develops, if the upper layers start to rot, if maggots appear just scrap off the top and eat the rest. If you were doing things correctly the mold and maggots would not appear. It is precisely becuase I could not find accurate tested recipes with clearly specified proportions of salt to vegetable that I purchased this book. The salt to vegetable ratio must necessarily vary depending on the water content of the vegetable, the same for the concentration of the brine, otherwise the resulting salinity will be wrong and wrong things will grow.

    The book also wastes and inordinate amount of time on vague directions for various barely drinkable alcoholic beverages. Who needs this information?

    And please do not try to do anything with meat based on this book. The failure to understand the clear difference between "curing" and "fermenting" is frightening; the failure to provide tested recipes is irresponsible and DANGEROUS. If you want to try curing see the book refered to above.

    For Japanese bran pickles find a copy of Shizuo Tsuji's Japanese Cooking A Simple Art. The process is far more complicated than Katz indicates. Tsuji provides clear, detailed instructions.

    The only useful piece of information in this book is that you can order pickling crocks on line from ACE Hardware and avoid the high shipping cost by having them delivered to your local store for pick up.

    But for everything else (and I could go on longer with the incomplete or dangerous instructions) find another book, one with specific, detailed, tested recipes. Unfortunately that book does not now appear to exist.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2014

    I enjoyed the history and background in the book, as I have been

    I enjoyed the history and background in the book, as I have been fermenting for about a year.  I have also read several of the authors's other books and enjoyed them immensely.  I like to know the how's and why's of things, and hear about other people's adventures into fermentation.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)