The Art Of Justice

Overview

As the principal courtroom sketch artist for the New York Times and WABC in New York, Marilyn Church covered many of America’s most infamous trials, from the downfall of John Gotti to the trial of would-be presidential assassin John Hinckley; from the conviction of Martha Stewart to the Sean “Puffy” Combs weapons possession trial.
 
In The Art of Justice, Marilyn Church takes readers into the courtroom for an insider’s view of thirty ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (41) from $1.99   
  • New (14) from $2.93   
  • Used (27) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

As the principal courtroom sketch artist for the New York Times and WABC in New York, Marilyn Church covered many of America’s most infamous trials, from the downfall of John Gotti to the trial of would-be presidential assassin John Hinckley; from the conviction of Martha Stewart to the Sean “Puffy” Combs weapons possession trial.
 
In The Art of Justice, Marilyn Church takes readers into the courtroom for an insider’s view of thirty sensational cases. Experience the story behind the dramatic headlines in the legal battles of subway vigilante Bernhard Goetz, Long Island Lolita Amy Fisher, preppie murderer Robert Chambers, David “Son of Sam” Berkowitz, the bizarre child custody war between Woody Allen and Mia Farrow, and many, many others.
 
In addition to more than one hundred brilliant full-color reproductions of Church’s artwork, The Art of Justice also includes compelling trial summaries by noted television journalist Lou Young and a Celebrity Gallery depicting the courtroom appearances of Mick Jagger, Yoko Ono, Paul Newman, Caroline Kennedy, Donald Trump, and a host of other luminaries.
 
Part artistic celebration, part cultural history, The Art of Justice is the perfect addition to any lawyer’s library and essential reading for true-crime fans everywhere!
 
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
From the 1970s through the present, courtroom artist Church has chronicled high-profile trials for the New York Times, women's magazines and local TV stations, capturing for posterity the likes of mutilated model Marla Hanson and subway vigilante Bernhard Goetz. More than 100 of her sketches are reproduced here in color and, aided by broadcast journalist Young, Church gives a human face to complicated, often impersonal and tedious legal proceedings. A former boxer convicted in a triple homicide, Rubin "Hurricane" Carter cradles his baby son during a break in the 1976 retrial, while "Dapper Don" John Gotti, facing a life sentence in 1992, instructs Church not to draw his neck fat. In 1987, surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead convulses in tears while her "Baby M" adversaries, William and Elizabeth Stern, watch impassively; in 1982, a shocked Norman Mailer listens to prot g Jack Henry Abbott describe how he killed a man while on parole. Court TV diehards will savor this trip down a memory lane stained with blood and tears, and Church's palette is gloriously evocative. But she misses her mark with pictures of Mia Farrow, Martha Stewart, Mike Wallace, and Jackie Onassis that don't quite look like the real thing. (Apr.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594740947
  • Publisher: Quirk Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/28/2006
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 10.75 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Marilyn Church (www.marilynchurch.com) is an accomplished professional painter and the best-known courtroom artist of our time. As the primary artist for the New York Times and WABC in New York, she covered many of the most infamous trials of the last three decades. She won an Emmy for her work recreating the scene of John Lennon’s murder and a New York Press Award for her coverage of the Jean Harris murder trial. Her drawings have been displayed at the New York Museum of Television and Radio, the Museum of Natural History in New York, the U.S. Supreme Court, and Harvard Law School, as well as in many other shows and exhibitions. Lou Young is a reporter with WCBS-TV in New York. He is a multiple Emmy Award–winner, and has also received honors from the Associated Press, United Press International, Radio and Television News Association, New York Press Club, and the Society of Professional Journalists. He has been a broadcast journalist for more than thirty years.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)