The Art of Procrastination: A Guide to Effective Dawdling, Lollygagging and Postponing

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Overview

This is not a book for Bill Gates. Or Hillary Clinton, or Steven Spielberg. Clearly they have no trouble getting stuff done. For the great majority of us, though, what a comfort to discover that we’re not wastrels and slackers, but doers . . . in our own way. It may sound counterintuitive, but according to philosopher John Perry, you can accomplish a lot by putting things off. He calls it “structured procrastination”:

In 1995, while not ...

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The Art of Procrastination: A Guide to Effective Dawdling, Lollygagging and Postponing

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Overview

This is not a book for Bill Gates. Or Hillary Clinton, or Steven Spielberg. Clearly they have no trouble getting stuff done. For the great majority of us, though, what a comfort to discover that we’re not wastrels and slackers, but doers . . . in our own way. It may sound counterintuitive, but according to philosopher John Perry, you can accomplish a lot by putting things off. He calls it “structured procrastination”:

In 1995, while not working on some project I should have been working on, I began to feel rotten about myself. But then I noticed something. On the whole, I had a reputation as a person who got a lot done and made a reasonable contribution. . . . A paradox. Rather than getting to work on my important projects, I began to think about this conundrum. I realized that
I was what I call a structured procrastinator: a person who gets a lot done by not doing other things.


Celebrating a nearly universal character flaw, The Art of Procrastination is a wise, charming, compulsively readable book—really, a tongue-in-cheek argument of ideas. Perry offers ingenious strategies, like the defensive to-do list (“1. Learn Chinese . . .”) and task triage. He discusses the double-edged relationship between the computer and procrastination—on the one hand, it allows the procrastinator to fire off a letter or paper at the last possible minute; on the other, it’s a dangerous time suck (Perry counters this by never surfing until he’s already hungry for lunch). Or what may be procrastination’s greatest gift: the chance to accomplish surprising, wonderful things by not sticking to a rigid schedule. For example, Perry wrote this book by avoiding the work he was supposed to be doing—grading papers and evaluating dissertation ideas. How lucky for us.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This is a fun audiobook—guaranteed to make fellow procrastinators chuckle and laugh throughout its relatively short run time. By the way, it took John Perry 16 years to turn his essay into a book and it may well have been worth the wait.”
DWD’s Reviews

“With a charming brand of vocal confidence and one of the clearest baritone voices in audio, Brian Holsopple does a wonderful job of delivering . . . [Perry’s] invitation for procrastinators to stop beating themselves up.”
AudioFile

DWD's Reviews
“This is a fun audiobook—guaranteed to make fellow procrastinators chuckle and laugh throughout its relatively short run time. By the way, it took John Perry 16 years to turn his essay into a book and it may well have been worth the wait.”
DWD’s Reviews
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761171676
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/28/2012
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 432,176
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 7.25 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

John Perry is an emeritus professor of philosophy at Stanford University and currently teaches at UC Riverside.
He is the co-host of the nationally syndicated public radio program Philosophy Talk, and winner, in 2011, of an Ig Nobel Prize in Literature for the essay “Structured Procrastination.” He lives with his wife in Palo Alto, California.

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Customer Reviews

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