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The Art of Reading as a Way of Life: On Nietzsche's Truth
     

The Art of Reading as a Way of Life: On Nietzsche's Truth

by Daniel T. O'Hara
 

In The Art of Reading as a Way of Life: On Nietzsche’s Truth Daniel T. O’Hara traces critically the current reception and translation of Nietzsche’s corpus and then some of Nietzsche’s boldest textual experiments in the art of reading as a way of life, including those in The Birth of Tragedy, The Gay Science, Thus Spoke

Overview

In The Art of Reading as a Way of Life: On Nietzsche’s Truth Daniel T. O’Hara traces critically the current reception and translation of Nietzsche’s corpus and then some of Nietzsche’s boldest textual experiments in the art of reading as a way of life, including those in The Birth of Tragedy, The Gay Science, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, The Anti-Christ, and Ecce Homo.

The shape of this critical tracing begins, however, in the middle of his career with The Gay Science and moves on to Thus Spoke Zarathustra, which Nietzsche believed was the central work of his life. It then revalues Ecce Homo, Nietzsche’s final autobiographical statement about his life and career, and concludes with a comparative analysis of two works from the beginning and end of that career: respectively, The Birth of Tragedy and The Anti-Christ. O’Hara’s highly original study, which uses Badiou’s theory of the truth-event as a guide, will surely provoke larger conversations across many disciplines.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810126220
Publisher:
Northwestern University Press
Publication date:
11/30/2009
Edition description:
1
Pages:
136
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Daniel T. O’Hara is a professor of English and was the first Andrew W. Mellon Term Professor in the Humanities at Temple University. He is the author of books on Yeats, visionary theory, Lionel Trilling, and radical parody. His latest book is Empire Burlesque: The Fate of Critical Culture in Global America (2003).

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