The Art of the Law School Transfer: A Guide to Transferring Law Schools [NOOK Book]

Overview

Transferring from one law school to another is like painting a delicate and complicated panorama, moving from one scene (your current law school) to a new one (the law school of your dreams). There are the technical elements, sure: certain methods and steps must be done at certain, specific times, and in certain ways. Failing to follow these can make your colors sag and smear, destroying all that you've done to that point. In law school, that's...
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The Art of the Law School Transfer: A Guide to Transferring Law Schools

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Overview

Transferring from one law school to another is like painting a delicate and complicated panorama, moving from one scene (your current law school) to a new one (the law school of your dreams). There are the technical elements, sure: certain methods and steps must be done at certain, specific times, and in certain ways. Failing to follow these can make your colors sag and smear, destroying all that you've done to that point. In law school, that's a lifetime of academic preparation.

As with all works of art, of course, there's an artistic element as well. So, it's not enough to simply submit papers and files on time. What is done must be done so that it's pleasing to those who see it: the admissions committee. (Or for transfers, often just one person: the dean of admissions.) Like all former transfer students, we painted our canvases. And as with nearly all novices, we made mistakes. These mistakes cost us time, money, and maybe even acceptance possibilities. The transfer process is full of quirks that a novice--any novice--will not see coming. With this book you will be prepared, and you will prepare your own work of art. After years of effort and sacrifice, don't ruin your portrait with needless errors. Instead, create the masterpiece that will get you into the law school of your dreams.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015115871
  • Publisher: The Fine Print Press
  • Publication date: 9/4/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 1,273,666
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Andrew Carrabis played collegiate NCAA baseball and, after graduation, worked as a high school teacher. He earned an MBA from Lynn University and an Executive Certificate of Negotiation from the University of Notre Dame. Andrew completed his 1L year ranked third out of 137 students at Florida A&M University College of Law. Andrew served as an intern clerk for the Honorable Paul G. Hyman, Chief Judge with the United States Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of Florida. He subsequently transferred to the University of Florida Levin College of Law, where he served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Technology Law & Policy, Executive Research Editor for the Florida Journal of International Law, and Executive Articles Editor for the Entertainment Law Review.

Seth Haimovitch played basketball and graduated with honors from the University of Florida with a Bachelor's degree in Sport Management, where he also earned a Master's degree in the same program. Seth completed his 1L year ranked second out of 137 students at Florida A&M University School of Law. He subsequently transferred to the University of Florida Levin College of Law, where he served as a research editor for the Entertainment Law Review.

The authors were lucky to be joined by numerous contributors, including Jacqueline Pace, who transferred to Harvard Law School; Robert Brayer, who transferred to UC-Berkeley's Boalt Hall School of Law; and Neil Wehneman, who graduated from Indiana University School of Law summa cum laude. We have also included interviews with Dean Kari A. Mattox (University of Florida); Dean Edward Tom (UC-Berkeley); and Dean Jason Trujillo (University of Virginia).
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 21, 2012

    A comprehensive guide to the transfer process

    "The Art of the Law School Transfer", by Andrew B. Carrabis and Seth D. Haimovitch, is the kind of book you don't realize you need until it's too late. To get straight to the point, if you're either (i) a 1L student a lower-ranked school and think you would be happier at a higher-ranked school (or think you were unfairly passed over for admission to a higher-ranked school but decided to attend your current school regardless), or (ii) a rising 2L student at a lower-ranked school who ends up with great grades at the end of the first year and now is considering how best to leverage those grades, then this book is a must-read and could have a significant effect on your career options after graduation from law school. In case you haven't realized already, the law school you graduate from can make the difference between an attorney office in a first-rate law firm, or working in the basement of the same law firm as a low-paid temporary document reviewer. Transferring from a lower-ranked school to a higher-ranked school at the end of the first year of law school is the last chance you have to determine which law school's name will appear on your diploma. (There is always the option of "visiting" another law school for your 3L year, but you won't graduate from the school you visit - you'll remain a graduate of your current school.) So if, for whatever reason, you want one last shot at a diploma from that dream school, this is it. Your law school name follows you through your career, and, rightfully or wrongly, it has an impact on your employment prospects, career opportunities, and even on what kind of lawyer clients and other lawyers see you as. And The Art of the Law School Transfer elevates the process of transferring to where it should be - far more than a couple of paragraphs in a typical law school guide, and worthy of a book of its own. The Art of the Law School Transfer guides the rising 2L through the process of transferring, but in far more depth and breadth than you might expect. Beginning with detailed information to help guide you though the thought process behind why you want to transfer and whether or not you should transfer, the book then navigates through the mechanics of putting together a successful transfer application, followed by offering substantial survival and acclimatization advice for you in your new law school. In most other law school guides, the section on transferring is minimal, mechanical, and almost an afterthought, but The Art of the Law School Transfer more than adequately covers the process from start to finish (and beyond) in a meaningful, practical way. Almost every law school web site you visit will have information detailing the transfer process, or, to be more accurate, information detailing the mechanics of the transfer process in terms of due dates, forms, and requirements. Although the transfer process is formalized, it doesn't mean there aren't areas in which you can shine, in which you can present a picture of yourself as a student that stands head and shoulders above everyone else with similarly good grades. And The Art of the Law School Transfer highlights the hidden details of the transfer process, giving your transfer application that little extra something in the high-stakes, ultra-competitive world of the law school transfer.

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