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The Art of the Old English Potter
     

The Art of the Old English Potter

3.0 1
by Louis Marc Solon
 
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This is an OCR edition with typos.

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026499083
Publisher:
Francis
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
348 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. SLIP-DECORATED WARE. The Slip Process.—Its Antiquity.—Its Introduction Into England.—Localities Where It Was Practised.—The Staffordshire Potters.—A Pot Works In The Moor- Lands.—Dr. Plot's Account.—Reckoning.— Varieties Of Shapes.—Names Of Some Slip Potters.—The Lettkring And Other Sorts Of Decoration.—A New Style or Slip Painting.—Richness or Colour.—rMtTAL Mounts.— Inscriptions.—Moderm Slip Ware. Fig n. Sliv Dish—Wolvekhampton Exhibition. SLIP-DECORATED WARE. HIS process, the simplest of all the means of polychrome decoration employed in early times, since it required nothing but the natural materials picked out of the earth, the Old English potter, in some sort, made his own by the diversity of effects he contrived to create out of it. It consisted in producing a design on the surface of the piece by pouring, through a small pipe, clay diluted with water to the consistency of a batter ; this " slip " flowed in running traceries, or dropped in small dots, boldly contrasting with the colour of the ground. The Romans used it very cleverly, and many pieces are still preserved in museums, testifying to the skill with which it was handled. Graceful flowery stems are intermixed with running animals, stags and dogs, whose curved limbs are all produced by the same jet of slip, freely poured through the narrow spout of a vessel contrived to that end. Brong- niard mentions the discovery at Lezoux (France) of one of these "pipettes," at the same place where fragments so decorated were found. That " pipette " presented at the lower aperture holes of different shapes, appropriated, no .doubt, to thesize of the intended design. A little vessel of almost the same shape was, for the same purpose, used in Staffordshire ; to its spout quills of various calibre we...

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