The Art of the Sale: Learning from the Masters about the Business of Life

The Art of the Sale: Learning from the Masters about the Business of Life

3.8 4
by Philip Delves Broughton
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

A revelatory examination of the alchemy of successful selling and its essential role in just about every aspect of human experience.

When Philip Delves Broughton went to Harvard Business School, an experience he wrote about in his New York Times bestseller Ahead of the Curve, he was baffled to find that sales was not on the curriculum.  Why

Overview

A revelatory examination of the alchemy of successful selling and its essential role in just about every aspect of human experience.

When Philip Delves Broughton went to Harvard Business School, an experience he wrote about in his New York Times bestseller Ahead of the Curve, he was baffled to find that sales was not on the curriculum.  Why not, he wondered?  Sales plays a part in everything we do—not just in clinching a deal but in convincing people of an argument, getting a job, attracting a mate, or getting a child to eat his broccoli.  Well, he thought; he’d just have to assemble his own master class in the art of selling.  And so he did, setting out on a remarkable pilgrimage to find the world’s great wizards of sales. 

Great selling is an art that demands creativity, mindfulness, selflessness, and resilience; but anyone who says you can become a great salesperson in 15 minutes is either a charlatan or a fool.  The more Delves Broughton traveled and listened, the more he found a wealth of applicable insight.  In Morocco, he found the master rug merchant who thrives in Kasbah by using age-old principles to read his customers.  In Tampa, he met with Tony Sullivan, king of the infomercial, and learned the importance of creating a good narrative to selling effectively.  In a sold-out seminar with sales guru Jeffrey Gitomer, he uncovered the ways successful selling approaches religion, inspiring faith and even a sense of duty in customers.  From celebrity art dealer Larry Gagosian to the most successful saleswoman in Japan, Broughton tracked down anyone who would help him understand what it took to achieve greatness in sales. 

Though sales is the engine of commerce and industry—more Americans work in sales than in manufacturing, marketing, or finance—it remains shrouded in myth. The Art of the Sale is a powerful beam of light onto the field, a wise and winning tour of the best in show of this endeavor which is nothing less than the means by which all of us, one way or another, get our way in the world.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Best book on sales ever? Who knows, but it surely is the best I've ever read. As a gazillion-mile-traveling salesman (ideas) myself,-I learned an amazing amount about who I am and what I do from this. We all live by selling: ideas or products or peace in our time. The Art of the Sale is perhaps unique-a marvelous book about selling, and life, and who we are and how we tick. And the case studies are dazzling." - Tom Peters

"For the author, sales is where the rubber hits the road, where the deals are done . . . Broughton has met with top sellers around the world, traveling to Japan, Morocco, and the United Kingdom in search of the keys to success in sales . . . Entertaining, balanced, and provocative." - Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"Broughton, promoting the idea that sales is a virtuous calling . . . makes an appealing, contrarian pitch." - The Wall Street Journal

"A descriptive account . . . long overdue." - The Economist

"Like Malcolm Gladwell, Delves Broughton is drawn to success stories where natural talent takes second place to hard work, but he's also willing to explore the manipulative, deceptive aspects of the task, as well as the endless rejection salespeople must face. His enthusiasm and admiration for skilled practitioners of the art is contagious." - Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101561744
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/12/2012
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
1,015,944
File size:
784 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Videos

Meet the Author

Philip Delves Broughton was born in Bangladesh and grew up in England. From 1998-2004, he served successively as the New York and Paris bureau chief for The Daily Telegraph of London and reported widely from North and South America, Europe and Africa. He led the Telegraph’s coverage of the 9/11 attacks on New York and his reporting has twice been nominated for the British Press Awards. His work has also appeared in the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Times of London, and the Spectator. In 2006, he received his MBA from Harvard Business School. He currently lives in New York with his wife and two sons.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Art of the Sale: Learning from the Masters about the Business of Life 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
The Art of the Sale by Philip Delves Broughton is a non-fiction book in which the author shares sto­ries and the­o­ries about what makes a sales­per­son. Mr. Broughton believes that we are all sales­peo­ple and could use sales skills every­day of our lives. I’m in agreement. Using exten­sive research and per­sonal expe­ri­ence, the author writes about sales tech­niques from a Moroc­can souk to Wall Street financiers, from street ven­dors to sell­ing we all do each and every day. The Art of the Sale by Philip Delves Broughton is a fun, charm­ing and edu­ca­tional book which gives one a glimpse into the world of the sales force. The book can be read in parts as every chap­ter gives anec­dotes from suc­cess­ful salesman. One of my biggest regrets is not learn­ing how to sell. My friend Tripp Braden told me a long time ago that if I knew how to sell I'd never have to look for a job. The more I get immersed in the busi­ness world, the more I see how right he was. I con­vinced myself I was a bad sales­man, from some unbe­knownst rea­son which I'm not will­ing to dwell on for my emo­tional well being and my con­stantly empty wal­let. How­ever, I can tell that this is not the case — as a web devel­oper I spent hours upon hours with mar­ket­ing per­son­nel and sales per­son­nel. While I cer­tainly don't think I can do the high pres­sure sale, I can cer­tainly use peo­ple skill, patience and power of per­sua­sion to make a few extra bucks. I remem­ber walk­ing with my beloved wife, may she live a long life, through the souk in Jerusalem. As an Amer­i­can, she was ner­vous and a bit fright­ened by the aggres­sive­ness of the ven­dors. To be hon­est, I was on edge as well. How­ever, we quickly dis­cov­ered that we could prob­a­bly get all our gift shop­ping done that day in one place. We found a ven­dor (or did he find us?) and I tried to bar­gain a pack­aged deal for a whole bunch of stuff (crosses, stars of David, camels, and what­not…). What the ven­dor didn’t know is that I’m not bad at math and fig­ured out the total sum. After about 40 min­utes of hag­gling, punch­ing num­bers into a cal­cu­la­tor and promis­ing to give me the deal of the decade he came up with a num­ber which was extremely close to…my orig­i­nal esti­mate. At this point my wife’s nerves were quickly com­ing to an end and we just paid and left. But I could have knocked it down by at least 20%. The book tells about fas­ci­nat­ing and hyp­o­crit­i­cal aspects of the sales per­son. The innate abil­ity to believe what­ever BS you’re sell­ing, the good sales can do (get­ting a job, sell­ing a book) and the bad (know­ingly sell­ing bad stocks), about rejec­tion and suc­cess, per­se­ver­ance and fail­ure. While almost no-one likes sales to the point where busi­ness schools don’t even teach it, our econ­omy wouldn’t be what it is with­out the one-on-one pitch. How many of us can hon­estly say that about sales­peo­ple we meet?