The Artist As Critic: Bitextuality in Fin-de-Siecle Illustrated Books

Hardcover (Print)
Not Available on BN.com
 

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Examines how text and image worked together to produce meaning in illustrated books in Victorian England. Aubrey Beardsley of course looms large, as well as such well known works as Oscar Wilde's Salome and Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. Less known authors examined include Laurence Housman, Margaret Armour, and Alice Sargant. Distributed by Ashgate. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781859281598
  • Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Limited
  • Publication date: 11/28/1995
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 6.38 (w) x 9.53 (h) x 1.18 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Introduction 1
1 Two Texts, Two Hands, Two Looks
Bitextual theory and the marriage of image and text 9
Readers, viewers, texts 12
The artist as critic: five dialogic relationships for image and text 14
2 Contextual/Bitextual: Aesthetes, Socialists, Journalists
Socialists and the art of the arts-and-crafts book 26
Aesthetes and the art of the art-nouveau book 31
Journalists and the art of the mass-produced book 35
Books and backgrounds: technologies, markets, theories 40
Sex and the art of the book 45
3 Quotation
Journalism and the construction of the real 54
Realism and romance: the fin-de-siecle adventure tale 56
I. 'You know my methods': the illustrator's Sherlock Holmes 58
II. Adventure on the edge of empire: Black Heart and White Heart 70
III. Ironic adventures: representation and disruption in Perfervid 74
4 Impression
Androgynous beauty and the aesthetic imagetext 91
Consuming passions and consummating environments 94
I. Bitextual couple, bisexual Sphinx: Ricketts, Wilde, and the decadent art of seduction 94
II. Bitextual marriage: Margaret Armour and W.B. Macdougall 107
5 Parody
Dazzling travesties: decadent and parodic illustration 127
Representation and authority: pictorial critique and textual disruption 129
I. Salome and sexual/textual politics: the Wilde dance of Aubrey and Oscar 130
II. Fringilla: impression, quotation, parody 146
III. Jump-to-Glory Jane: one man's satire is another man's saint 149
6 Answering
An architectonics of answerability 167
Communal aesthetics and the folk-arts revival 171
I. Art, politics and dreams: The Well at the World's End 172
II. The Were-Wolf: decadent man answers New Woman 184
III. A Book of Ballads: Alice Sargant, William Strang and the Celtic revival 189
7 Cross-Dressing
Bitextual identity and the androgynous ideal: the transvestism of the text 203
Cross-dressing and bitextual politics 207
I. William Strang: the artist as woman as hero 209
II. Laurence Housman: homosocial solidarity and bitextual art 214
III. Aubrey Beardsley; cross-dressing comes out of the closet 226
8 Entr'acte 247
Appendix: Select Annotated Bibliography of First-Edition Illustrated books 252
Bibliography 278
Index 291
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)